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aero bars(4 posts)

aero bars2cflyr
May 23, 2002 11:47 AM
any recommendations? bolt on a good way to go?
re: aero barsbrider
May 23, 2002 12:59 PM
I've tried various bars, from full bars to clip-ons, and found the clip-ons to be the most versatile, especially for some one who does mostly road riding. Full bars tend to offer a lot less adjustability, and don't allow changes in angle relative to the base bar. The best advice is to get a professional fitting, regardless of which bar you choose.
Using Profile Design Airstryke 2000. . .js5280
May 24, 2002 1:23 PM
which I have been very happy with. I choose them because the arm rest spring up so that you can reach the tops, an important consideration if you have a lot of climbs (like here in Colorado) and like to use the tops. However, if this is a strict tri bike you probably don't need this feature and it does add some weight over fixed arm rests. Bolt-ons are great because you can take put them on/off w/out having to install/uninstall everything. However, they aren't super-easy to remove/install, I just keep my on. They do make a big difference, especially in headwinds, and will decrease your ride times. Here's a good article on fit and setup. . .

http://www.triathlete.com/art.asp?1=2&2=51&3=30&pg=1

Make sure you know when you should and shouldn't use them. Some races they are prohibited and you shouldn't use the aerobars when in a paceline or riding in a group. They are unnecessary and dangerous then! You're already aero from the draft if following. Some people will pull in the aerobars but I don't think it's great idea, it's not very easy to point on debris and you risk the safety of the others behind you! Save it for solo efforts. . .

If this is for a dedicated tri or TT bike, then bolt-ons are probably going to be heavier and/or not as aero than a dedicated tri bar.

BTW- I'm by no means an expert in this area, just what I learned so far about the subject. Good luck! They are a great tool to have and the learning curve isn't that bad, just be careful. Work you way up for both increased speeds and shaper turns. Only one mishap so far. Went through a series of curves and ran off the path while in the aerobars, managed to grab the rear brake and come to a stop w/out laying it down. Whew!

Here's a post I wrote on my aerobar experience. . .
RaiderMike "First ride on the aerobars. . ." 3/28/02 4:35pm
Using Profile Design Airstryke 2000. . .2cflyr
May 29, 2002 8:55 AM
Thanks for all of the information!
Ethan