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Can anyone offer an opinion on a fair price?(9 posts)

Can anyone offer an opinion on a fair price?ZenJones
Dec 31, 2003 6:17 PM
For this 1985 Trek 520??
re: Can anyone offer an opinion on a fair price?ZenJones
Dec 31, 2003 6:18 PM
re: Can anyone offer an opinion on a fair price?ZenJones
Dec 31, 2003 6:21 PM
Another pic
re: Can anyone offer an opinion on a fair price?ZenJones
Dec 31, 2003 6:22 PM
Another
Question:Dave_Stohler
Dec 31, 2003 9:43 PM
The Trek 520 is a touring bike, so why the corncob cogs and the short-cage derailleur? Also, are you sure it's a 1985? With a 5-speed freewheel????
I'm betting that it's a mish-mash of parts. I'd give you $200 for it if I were looking. Probably my size, too...
Dave-ZenJones
Jan 2, 2004 2:57 AM
Hi-

Thanks for the reply. Yeah, I checked the serial # at the vintage Trek website and she's a 1985 520.

Yes, I know that the 520 is a tourer but have zero idea why the parts are as they are... that way when I got her.

Can you help me out on a few words and phrases from your post? What is a "corncob cog", "short-cage deraileur"... and why is a 5-speed freewheel remarkable on a 1985 and/or 520?

Thanks
I'll help if I canlaffeaux
Jan 2, 2004 10:35 AM
What is a "corncob cog"?
It's a cogset where the number of teeth on the next larger cog is just larger than the previous one - i.e. the gears might be 13-14-15-16-17. The cogset is refered to as a "corncob" because it looks like it's namesake. The close ratios are great for racing on flat terrain, but not so good for loaded hill climbing. The opposite is a "wide range" cogset.

What is a "short-cage deraileur"?
Deraillers come with different length cages. The longer the cage the more loose chain they cane take up. A long cage derailler can handle a much wider range of gears. For example, most mountain bikes (and touring bikes) have long cages that allow for a triple chain ring and a wide-range cassette. A short cage limits the difference between the high and low gear combinations that you can run, but it should shift a little quicker (better for racing).

Why is a 5-speed freewheel remarkable on a 1985 and/or 520?
By 1985 almost all bikes came with either 6 or 7 cogs in the rear. The 5-speed cogset is probably older than the frame.

All of these are "odd" on a touring bike. Touring requires as many as a wide a range of gears as possible. All three of these add up to a bike that is probably not a good tourer (short of replacing the drivetrain). Your bike is geared more like an old racer.

Hope that helps.
I'll help if I canZenJones
Jan 2, 2004 12:58 PM
Thank you for the detailed explanation. Being new to all of this I can use all the help I can get when it comes to terms, phrases, etc.

Thanks again and Happy New Year to you!
I'll help if I canvosyer
Jan 10, 2004 2:56 AM
Don't worry about the parts on the bike they didn'y come orginally with the bike - when someone usually buys a Trek 520 from the mid 80's it's for the frame. Which is one the strongest touring non - custom ones built in the heyday of Treks being built. So the value to anyone today is the frame. In today's market Trek still makes version of this bike with a more modern touring drive train and sells retail for ($1200 to 1400) dollars. Personally, I think the offer of $200 seems fair assuming the frame is straight. I back end will have to be spread to 130 which will have to cost around $50 unless someone wants to deal with older parts that might have lying around