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cold weather traning(3 posts)

cold weather traningNoam
Jun 16, 2002 3:20 AM
Anyone using red hot ointment. Are there any real benefits or just use the legwarmers.

Noam
Downunder
the joys of greaselonefrontranger
Jun 17, 2002 11:22 AM
On cold dry days you're better off to keep warm layers of cloth over your muscles, although you can apply a prep underneath (watch it tho, this gets "hot" in a hurry!). On cold WET days, I find that you will stay much warmer by using a layer of prep and grease, and eliminating soaked layers of fabric on your skin.

Muscle preps are products which increase circulation and encourage blood to rise to the muscle surface via ingredients like camphor or capsaicin. Use care because the warming agent may take a bit to get going, but once it does, you can wind up darn near blistered if you go too "hot". Companies like Brave Soldier and Sixtufit make good muscle preps / oils or you can use sports cremes like Ben-Gay.

I've used the grease method for several years at wet cold races. A couple fellows I know who've raced the Euro classics taught me this, and they're right, as crazy as it sounds. My legs stay much warmer and looser on a 2 degrees C and pouring down horrible day with the grease. I have a special "rain bag" just for wet days. In it I keep muscle prep, an old pair of shorts and some ratty bath towels, a roll of newspaper, a couple pair of black socks, a cycling cap, rubbing alcohol, Vaseline, sandwich bags, a plastic garbage bag, my shoe covers and a clear plastic rain cape.

1) On "grease" days, you will get satisfyingly filthy, so use the oldest team kit you own and solid black shorts. On cold wet days, everyone else stays in their car until the last possible moment anyway, so I substitute the grease ritual and the ride to the start line as my warmup.

2) Spread newspaper over your car seats to avoid getting prep and Vaseline everywhere. Some guys use a sheet of clear plastic or an old blanket to protect the upholstery for this.

3) Working as near to "bottomless" as modesty and / or vehicular privacy allows, apply liberal amounts of the muscle prep of your choice, in the "heat" of your choice to all the large muscle surfaces of your legs (yes, including the glutes, but keep well away from your naughty bits with the prep!).

3) Once you've got the prep well rubbed in, you then apply the "insulating layer" on top. This means Vaseline, as thick as you can stand. The goal is a slimy layer sitting on top of the skin to repel water. Now put your shorts on without removing too much grease. It gets easier with practice.

4) Put one pair of socks over your feet, followed by the sandwich bags. Yes your feet will sweat, but better warm and sweaty than cold and numb. Follow the bags with your cycling shoes, then your shoe covers. The spare pair is to use post-race.

5) Pin your number on your jersey, put it on, put armwarmers on, and throw the clear rain cape over the whole mess. The cape is waterproof so you don't have to grease under it. Put a cycling cap on, visor forward, and your helmet on over the cap. The visor helps to keep wheel spray and grit out of your eyes. You are now ready to do battle.

6) Once done for the day, warm up the car (sit on the newspapers), run the heater on "high", strip off all your wet filthy gear including shoes and throw it into the garbage bag for later sorting. Soak a corner of a towel in the alcohol, then rub / strip the layer of filth-encrusted grease and prep off your legs, alternating alcohol and clean water. Keep a clean towel back for doing your face, ears and neck. You can get pretty close to acceptably clean enough for a sit-down meal with enough towels and persistence.
the joys of greaseNoam
Jun 18, 2002 2:04 AM
Thanks Mate

Noam
Downunder