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Question from beginner(6 posts)

Question from beginnerPeterRider
Aug 16, 2001 4:30 PM
Well, actually it's not really a question about race but rather about rides (like 50-80 miles) organized by bike clubs or other.

What do you bring with you when you do that ? A light back bag with pump and extra tire ? Nothing ? Tire in your pocket ?

Thanks !
re: Question from beginnerflyinbowlofmilk
Aug 16, 2001 5:35 PM
I would tell you to bring something to snack on while you do the ride. But if the group you are riding with are stopping some where for a break. I would recommend you wait until you get to the place. It can help or it can hurt you. I also recommend you have bring 1or 2 water bottle and make sure they a full of water. You may also bring a spare inner tube too ,just in case. I hope this will help you.
re: Question from beginnerwes
Aug 16, 2001 9:23 PM
Money! If it's a club ride, I'll bet ya that they stop at a coffee shop or something like that towards the end of the ride. Nothing worse than watching everyone else drink their coffee and not having some cash.

Oh, a patchkit, small tool "thing-a-mabob" and pump is good too.

With all your stuff, don't forget to write your emergency info on a piece of paper. Not to scare you or anything, but it's kinda important. I've never had to use my emer info (thank god)
re: Question from beginnerpmannion
Aug 17, 2001 5:05 AM
If you'rea beginner, even 50 miles can be tough, so to start off, I'd suggest you bring two water bottles (filled), plus at the very least, 1-2 energy bars in your jersey pockets. a banana would be good too. Don't be afraid to run out of water. Keep drinking and call out for a refill stop if/when you need to. You'll really hate it if you encounter leg cramps due to lack of hydration. Start nibling at your food after the first 1-1.5 hours, and keep nibling every 1/2 hour thereafter. Never stop drinking. That should be continual.

in your seat-pack, bring at least 1 spare tube (plus patch kit if just 1), tire levers.....bring a pump too, or a co2 catridge (whatever you like using).
re: Question from beginnerJL
Aug 20, 2001 7:13 AM
I agree with the others comments above and FWIW I'll add the following.
The organized rides usually indicate what to bring in the newsletters I've seen. They are usually unsupported and indicate distance/speed and when/if they'll be making stops along the route.
If it's an organized, supported century or similar there are usually stops and/or SAG support, but don't depend on the support passing too often. Just make sure your equipment is in good working order BEFORE you arrive at the start of any ride.
Don't you carry a pump/patch kit on your normal rides? Always keep some money in your bike bag or pocket. It's easy to use at all your "gourmet food" gas station/rest stops. Also, the dollar bills make a quick & dirty emergency tire boot.

Good luck and happy riding.

JL
re: Question from beginnermoneyman
Aug 21, 2001 7:07 AM
When I first started road riding seriously, a 50 mile ride required a camel back filled with multiple power bars, leg and arm warmers, two spare tubes, a spare tire, cell phone, jacket, hat, and anything else I could cram in there along with the 96 oz bladder filled to the rim. Today, a 50 mile ride means 2 water bottles and a hammer gel flask that ususally doesn't get touched. I also wear a dog-tag with vital information, carry a $10 bill and a cell phone (turned off) just in case, in my jersey pockets. In my seat bag I have a spare tube, patch kit, tire levers and multi-tool that I have never had to use.

In the beginning, 50 miles was an epic journey. Today, it is just a regular training ride. You'll likely find the same is true for you. But what I have discovered is take only what you'll really need. There is a certain pride that comes with being a minimalist, as well as the practicality of not carrying a bunch of junk. Start by taking everything you think you'll need, then discard stuff on the next ride. It's a never-ending quest, and it actually provides a bit of fun as you try to pare down what is needed and only take what you absolutely have to have. I'm still working on it.

$$