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Bicycle bomb used in Iraq(6 posts)

Bicycle bomb used in IraqLive Steam
Jan 10, 2004 8:35 AM
The inventiveness of the terrorist mind never ceases to amaze me. One must be truly psychotic to even contemplate something like this. I do not see it as evidence of devotion or belief in a cause. That person can no longer help or further the efforts of his cause because his voice is silenced. Religious fanaticism is dangerous and misplaced. The odd thing about it here is Iraq was and still remains a secular state.

AP
About 35 miles northeast of Baghdad, a man exploded a bicycle bomb attached to a propane cylinder outside the Sadiq Mohammed mosque, blowing up himself, killing five and wounding dozens of others just after midday prayers.

The bombing targeted Shiite Muslims, who were repressed under Saddam's Sunni-dominated regime.
Don't be fooled by the labels53T
Jan 10, 2004 2:51 PM
If you belive in today's religious wars, you will be tricked into thinking the protestants hate catholics in Northern Ireland. None of these people has any deep religeous convictions, they simly use religion as a way of keeping score. Money is the key in all conflicts. Shiites were "oppressed", this meand impoverished. The Sunnis got all the money, the religion is just a smoke screen. Teh United Kingdom is a secular state as well.
Yes, but more importantlypurplepaul
Jan 10, 2004 3:51 PM
What kind of bicycle was it?

Aluminum, Steel, Ti or some exotic composite?

Did it have Shimano or Campagnolo?

What kind of tires?
how insensitive!!!!Woof the dog
Jan 10, 2004 10:14 PM
purple paul, you should be ashamed of yourself!!!

I bet it was a one speed

woof.
Considering history, one would have to conclude...dr hoo
Jan 11, 2004 6:39 AM
... it was an english 3 speed.
The MindsetJon Billheimer
Jan 11, 2004 11:08 AM
To gain some understanding of the terrorist mindset, at least from a political tactical perspective, read "The Wretched of the Earth", by Franz Fanon. Fanon was an Algerian physician involved in the anti-French resistance in the late 50s and early 60s. His rationale and justification for terrorism, in a nutshell, is that terrorism forces otherwise relatively neutral parties into taking sides, that is, it polarizes and defines society politically.

Outside a political context it remains a fact of human nature that people are capable of unspeakable cruelty toward one another.