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McDonalds and dieting(5 posts)

McDonalds and dietingColnagoFE
Jan 7, 2004 10:14 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2004/HEALTH/diet.fitness/01/07/mcdonalds.choice.ap/index.html

Weren't we just talking about this the other day?
Call me a cynic. . .czardonic
Jan 7, 2004 12:45 PM
. . .but I suspect that this is just another attempt by a fast food outfit to capitalize on the high fat/low carb diet craze. What better place to get thin and healthy by stuffing your gut with high fat foods than McDonalds (well, Burger King, IMO).

The call for prominent disclosure of nutrition informaion has been around for decades. Now that the trends favor McDonald's unbalanced fare they are piping up.
Food Industry Response to Obesity: Part Hope, Part Fear.Dale Brigham
Jan 7, 2004 1:26 PM
The U.S. food industry is beginning to respond to the looming obesity crisis by reformulating food composition and portion size, providing nutrition information and product health claims to consumers, and promoting their products in conjunction with appeals for healthy lifestyle (e.g., physical activity).

I believe their response is motivated partly by hope and partly by fear. They hope to gain market advantage by creating increasing perceived value for their products and enhancing their image in consumers' eyes (i.e., being a good corporate citizen). They fear that, if they do nothing, consumer litigation and government regulation will hamstring them and that the public will vilify their product, decreasing sales and profits.

I'm such a crazy optimist that I think the food industry will be a very effective ally in the fight against obesity, once they consider the advantages of being part of the solution, rather than part of the problem.

Dale
Food Industry Response to Obesity: Part Hope, Part Fear.Jon Billheimer
Jan 7, 2004 2:22 PM
Good thought, Dale. I hope you're right. But probably what won't happen is for the food industry to start pushing fresh produce, fruit, and non-estrogen laden meats and de-emphasizing processed convenience foods. But hey, progress has to start somewhere, right?
Yep, Jon, even I'm not that much of a crazy optimist. (nm)Dale Brigham
Jan 7, 2004 2:31 PM