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The Medicare bill passed...now what?(9 posts)

The Medicare bill passed...now what?ColnagoFE
Nov 25, 2003 9:57 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2003/ALLPOLITICS/11/25/elec04.medicare/index.html

Seems to me that this opens a whole can of worms for Medicare. Will similar bills be far behind? I'm guessing drug companies are celebrating today. How big of an influence did the drug lobby have with this passing anyway? You don't really hear that part of it.
re: The Medicare bill passed...now what?No_sprint
Nov 25, 2003 10:00 AM
Lots of bills open up huge new cans of worms. We just roll on.
i heard..rufus
Nov 25, 2003 10:27 AM
that during some conference committee about the bill, those present were all republicans and a representative for the pharmaceuticals. no democrats.
Drug companies were HUGE. Could it be the end of Medicare?Cory
Nov 25, 2003 10:40 AM
Most of the stories I've read have pointed out that the drug companies have given millions in "campaign contributions," which are somehow different from bribes but I can't explain how. That industry is among the biggest, if not THE biggest, contributors in Congress.
Molly Ivins said 61 percent of the money in the program will be for new drug company profits. She definitely has a point of view, but she's not going to make up a number like that in a national column.
Ho-hum, more waste and big-biz largesse in a Republican plan. What worries me, though, is the emphasis on privatizing health care for seniors. How can ANYBODY not see that the private insurance companies are going to skim off the cream and leave the expensively dying octogenarians to the government? With the blessing and subsidy of the GOP, too.
Can you say 'high risk pool?' We have one of thoseOldEdScott
Nov 25, 2003 11:04 AM
in Kentucky, and it's just nightmarish. That's where Medicare is heading. The healthy will be covered by federally subsidized insurers, the rich diseased will come up with the cash difference to stay privately insured, and the poor diseased will be plopped into a 'pool' of minimalist so-called 'coverage' that will be a source of national shame.

The only light in this dark tunnel is, I don't believe the country will tolerate it once they see the GOP's hidden agenda here, and the Repubs (congenitally cursed to always overreach) will be turned out of office again.

The Repubs are smart, though. They see the country wants something -- in this case, drug coverage -- and under the guise of giving that benefit, they're setting up to destroy a larger entitlement they've long hated. No frontal attacks from these guys.
Can you say 'high risk pool?' We have one of thoseJon Billheimer
Nov 25, 2003 12:00 PM
The only way out of the continued rape of America by the GOP and their corporate mafiosi is if the democrats get off their fractured, incompetent asses and start communicating effectively with Americans. And for that to happen, they need effective leadership. So in my pessimism I think the country will continue to tolerate the present authoritarian corporate lobby in Washington, in the absence of any other perceived alternative.
Right, and that's why we've fanned out to spread the word.OldEdScott
Nov 25, 2003 12:05 PM
I, for example, was assigned by the DNC to enlighten this Internet forum! There's one of us in every forum in the country!
Good thing all four of you are here.No_sprint
Nov 25, 2003 12:26 PM
Spreadin' the word... LOL Any politician who brought up any of your hair brained, extremist ideas would laughed out of Washington by his/her own people! Looks like it'll have to be a grass roots effort! :)
That's what impresses me--the long-range planning.Cory
Nov 25, 2003 5:29 PM
I've always faintly disbelieving at first when I hear about schemes like this. Personally, I can't plan lunch 15 minutes ahead, so when I see something like this that looks like it's aimed at getting rid of MediCare 15 years down the road, I think, "Nah, that's just my liberal paranoia." Then it turns out that was their plan all along.
The other thing that impresses me is the fierce yearning the American public seems to have for a father figure to tell them, "No, it's really fudge. Eat it." So they taste it, and it doesn't much taste like fudge, but Dad says it is, so they gulp it down.