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talk about politically incorrect...(12 posts)

talk about politically incorrect...DougSloan
Oct 9, 2003 10:47 AM
Black Leaders Outraged at Board Game
Wed Oct 8, 9:02 PM ET Add U.S. National - AP to My Yahoo!


By BILL BERGSTROM, Associated Press Writer

PHILADELPHIA - Cheap Trick Avenue instead of Boardwalk? Hernando's Chop Shop instead of Reading Railroad?

Black leaders are outraged over a new board game called "Ghettopoly" that has "playas" acting like pimps and game cards reading, "You got yo whole neighborhood addicted to crack. Collect $50."

Black clergymen say the game, the brainchild of a Pennsylvania man, should be banned, and have called for a boycott of Urban Outfitters unless the company stops selling Ghettopoly in its chain of clothing stores.

Urban Outfitters has not publicly commented on the issue, and did not return a call seeking comment on Wednesday.

"If we are silent on this issue there is more of this type to come," the Rev. Robert P. Shine Sr., president of the Black Clergy of Philadelphia & Vicinity, said at a sidewalk rally Wednesday in front Urban Outfitters' corporate headquarters in Philadelphia.

Shine displayed the game board, with properties including Westside Liquor, Harlem, The Bronx, and Long Beach City, and squares labeled Smitty's XXX Peep Show, Weinstein's Gold and Platinum, and Tyron's Gun Shop.

Players draw "Hustle" and "Ghetto Stash" cards with directions like, "You're a little short on loot, so you decided to stick up a bank. Collect $75," and "Steal $$$ if you pass Let$ Roll."

The creator of Ghettopoly, David Chang, did not immediately answer e-mails or phone calls seeking comment about the game.

On his Web site, Chang is unapologetic, and promises that more games — Hoodopoly, Hiphopopoly, Thugopoly and Redneckopoly — are coming soon.

"It draws on stereotypes not as a means to degrade, but as a medium to bring together in laughter," Chang maintains, adding, "If we can't laugh at ourselves ... we'll continue to live in blame and bitterness."

But the Ghettopoly board depicts figures labeled "Malcum X" and "Martin Luthor King Jr." — intentionally misspelled — noted Rev. Glenn Wilson, pastor of Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church.

"This is beyond making fun, to use the caricature of Dr. King in this regard," Wilson said. "There's no way that game could be taken in any way other than that this man had racist intent in marketing it."

The Philadelphia black clergy and Men United for a Better Philadelphia were just the latest to protest the game. In Chicago, the Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor of St. Sabina Catholic Church, called for a boycott of Urban Outfitters. In Florida, the St. Petersburg and Hillsborough County chapters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (news - web sites) urged the company to stop carrying the game.

"I was outraged. We called Outfitters, we wrote them a letter, we held a press conference, but we've had no response," Pfleger said Wednesday.

___

On the Net:

Ghettopoly: http://www.ghettopoly.com
re: talk about politically incorrect...ClydeTri
Oct 9, 2003 10:51 AM
the best way to deal with such things is to ignore them, not give them tens of thousands of dollars of free advertising...you play into their hands by running to the press to complain...politically incorrect? yes, but totally legal ...so, if you are one of the offended, keep your mouth shut and nobody will even hear of them.
Well, I'm not sure who would pay $29.95 for that garbageKristin
Oct 9, 2003 11:00 AM
I doesn't even seem to be funny to me. But not because it looks racist. I can't see enough about the game to make a decision about whether or not its racist. It seems to be poking fun, in a lame kinda way, at ghetto stereotypes. Last time I checked, the ghetto wasn't restricted to only African American's. Distasteful? Sure. Negative waiste of time and energy. Absolutley. Racist? Perhaps a little. But do you think that some of the protestors are over-reacting just a bit? I gaurantee its gained sales from all the publicity. Its a dumb game and a dumb idea. If they'd ignored it, probably very few people would ever have heard of it.
kristin..you did it again..ClydeTri
Oct 9, 2003 11:05 AM
you agreed with me again...you better rethink your views! :)
I think it's hilarious. Can't wait for Redneckopoly! nmOldEdScott
Oct 9, 2003 11:17 AM
I *think* it already exists NMTri_Rich
Oct 9, 2003 11:40 AM
Me too! LOL nmNo_sprint
Oct 9, 2003 11:42 AM
While I completely agree...Matno
Oct 9, 2003 9:02 PM
with Kristin, Redneckopoly does sound fun. I can't help but wonder why it is that anybody can make fun of rednecks (or any other group of non-Jewish whites), but only blacks can make fun of blacks. Is it a confidence thing (or lack thereof)? Or is it just that white "community activists" (that's how Al Sharpton is described in the media) don't care about race, whereas black activists don't seem to care about anything BUT race (at least the ones in the news)? Just curious...
re: talk about politically incorrect...Jusme
Oct 9, 2003 11:30 AM
Maybe while they're protesting the game, they can actually take an honest look at the stupid subculture that way too many young black people are a part of.

It's a whole self destructive mindset that glorifies and normalizes behavior that is being reflected in the game. Do something about the reality of this lifestyle and then oriental people from Amish country won't be able to make games like these.

All this guy did was shine a spotlight on it, if you want to deal with the real issue, stop cultivating this image/culture.
"Oriental people from Amish country"Could be a game right there!128
Oct 9, 2003 11:52 AM
but no one is allowed to actually say that... nmDougSloan
Oct 9, 2003 12:53 PM
"Snobopoly" would be fun. Favorite:"Hiphopoloy".128
Oct 9, 2003 12:00 PM
"iopoly" for the introverts.

Wasn't the original game a political indictment of turn of the century industrial exploitation or something? Some vague recollection that that game started as one to raise awarness and caricature extreme behavior.