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Kenneth Lay--King Chickens*it (nm)(4 posts)

Kenneth Lay--King Chickens*it (nm)Xenu
Feb 5, 2002 9:04 AM
Is this guy for real? Can't even testify before Congress without a subpeona! Someone ought to hang this lying corportate scum out to dry. Unfortuantely the worst he'll probably get is a few months in federal country club prison where he can perfect his golf game. And the poor sap that robs a Qwick E Mart goes to real jain for real time. What makes what they did any different from what Kenny boy did.
Have you no compassion?mr_spin
Feb 5, 2002 9:35 AM
Imagine the humiliation he has to endure having to fly commercial air travel to one of his four homes in Aspen rather than a private jet. That is the kind of pain no one should have to suffer.
Think of his poor wife...Me Dot Org
Feb 5, 2002 9:57 AM
...on the talk show circuit, claiming they are having a hard time "becoming liquid".

I don't know how many poor people make the same complaint every day. Well actually I do:

ZERO

Seriously, this man did a lot more harm than someone who robs a gas station. He'll plead the fifth (as is his right), but you'd have a hard time convincing me that the CEO of an organization doesn't know about 3,000 limited partnership keeping debt off the books. If several people from Enron and Arthur Andersen don't do serious jail time, there is something really wrong with the criminal justice system.
Letters from former Enron employeesTig
Feb 6, 2002 7:23 AM
Here are 2 letters submitted to The Houston Chronicle by former Enron employees. They show insight to the fall of the once great company.

I was in Enron Capital and Trade, later Enron North America in the IT department from 1998-2000 and I have to say that the corporate culture there was truly terrible.

Enron was flying high in those days, and the employee mentality was always, "How can I get a piece?" and many employees were only concerned with their own advancement, often times to the detriment of the company.

There was always a great amount of political infighting, nearly completed projects were often scrapped for purely political reasons. The failure of the EBS-Blockbuster deal can be attributed primarily to internal politics.

While I do not believe that the corporate culture had a direct hand in Enron's fall, I think that culture comes from the upper management, and that the "me-first" mentality was probably rampant amongst the Enron upper management and that probably contributed to the questionable practices that did lead to Enron's downfall.

Anonymous

I went to work for Enron in September 1989. I was laid off in August 2001. For the most part, I enjoyed my time there -- until about two years ago -- when Jeff Skilling took over. He instituted this review system that was universally hated by Enron employees.

What it amounted to was that, in addition to feedback from your supervisor, anybody and everybody could offer feedback on you. Plus you knew that the bottom 10% were going to get axed. This changed the entire atmosphere at Enron. It became a den of back-stabbers and snitches. People felt like they had to make somebody else look bad so that they could advance.

Another bad thing -- we grew so fast that they started hiring a lot of people from other companies who did not have what I call the "old" Enron ethic--teamwork. People just wanted to get ahead, no matter what. ...

They wanted a young work force. When I got laid off in August it was the three oldest people in our department that got laid off. The HR person told us what our severence package would be, then laid a release down in front of us and said, "if you sign this release saying you won't sue us, we will double the severance package." Well, of course, I signed it. But I really didn't care: When I got laid off I just wanted out.

Enron had become a tremendously bad place to work. It was like a meatgrinder -- the stress was terrible. Things were constantly changing, priorities came and went on a daily basis, reorganizations every six months. It was crazy.

Anonymous