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Inline Skating(16 posts)

Inline Skatingsuperdreadnought
Dec 29, 2003 9:04 AM
Anyone do indoor inline skating during the off-season? That way you are not on the trainer all the time. How does inline skating effect bike training, or how might it fit in?
re: Inline Skatingwitcomb
Dec 29, 2003 11:35 AM
I inline in the summer, who says you can only cycle?

Anyway, they are completely different muscles although I guess cardio is cardio. In the summer I tend to inline home from work, I only live about 5-6km away so cycling is pointless, then once home I go cycling. The only thing I could find that inlining did was make my knees sore, that took a while to realise since I never noticed till after a ride.

Just curious, isn't indoor inline skating just ice-skating :)
re: Inline SkatingKG 361
Dec 29, 2003 11:39 AM
Yep-ice skating on wheels. Similar muscles used except skates use your butt muscles more-not a bad thing. I think that I may do some skating this winter just to mix things up. I just did about 2.5 miles at an outdoor track with my wife and kids. Not a bad short workout.
re: Inline Skatingdcdre
Dec 29, 2003 2:40 PM
I used biking as cross training for a big inline race (wet pavement is easier on a bike - you have brakes!). You'll work your quads lots as not only are you using them to push yourself forward, you're also using them to support your body weight. Cardio-wise, I always find skating to be harder than biking.

Indoor skating can be either tooling around at a gym or indoor speedskating, which is pretty intense.

My knees love skating. It's built up all the muscles around the knee to help strenghten them - ski-beaten knees.

Feel free to ask specific questions.
re: Inline Skatingwitcomb
Dec 29, 2003 3:47 PM
That is interesting that you found it helped your knees. I found that due to a lateral force at my knee (perpendicular to my leg) I tended to get a soreness.

It does get your butt and quads pretty good. When I said the it wasn't the same muscles, I tend to find that it is manly muscles on the inside and outside of my leg and not the top.
re: Inline Skatingdcdre
Dec 30, 2003 6:58 AM
As has been mentioned in several posts, skating is far more technique driven than biking is. When done right (and it does take lotsa practice) you push straight through the leg, never really exerting any lateral force on the knee. Skating builds up all the leg muscles, so the muscles compensate for a weakened knee.

As for suffering and intensity, know all about it. 87 hilly miles from Athens to Atlanta, GA, every year 4 years running. Y'all bikers have it easy, you have gears. All we got is muscles and willpower. But a pack of speedskaters drafting is something incredible that you won't quite experience on a bike - you'll never feel the guy behind you pushing you downhill!
re: Inline Skatingsuperdreadnought
Dec 29, 2003 4:50 PM
I do the skating at the Pontiac Silver Dome, on the upper level. There are speed skaters there, but not me, four wheels and pretty slow (stay to the right or you might get whacked).
excellent cross-trainingrussw19
Dec 29, 2003 4:57 PM
Someone else mentioned that it works your glutes, but it also works your hamstrings much more than cycling. While cycling you don't work your hamstrings that much because you are not really lifting your feet, you are spinning them in circles. But with inline skating (or ice skating too) like running, you are picking up your feet as you stride. It helps to work your hamstrings even more than running because although you don't tend to lift your feet as high, the skates weigh more than running shoes.

I have never had any knee problems associated with skating, and I would most likely suspect that if you are having it, it's related to form. But that's just a guess on my part. I would look for someone who either races inlines competitively or someone who does speed skating on ice and have them check out your stride to see what is going on.

I play hockey year round in addition to riding. They both keep me in shape for the other. Most of my hockey is played on inline skates (bad part about Florida is not enough ice rinks) but occasionally play on ice. It will certainly keep your legs strong.

Russ
excellent cross-trainingirregardless
Dec 29, 2003 5:04 PM
It also works the muscles in the front of your lower leg, right in front of your shins, the ones where you get shin splints. If you ever see experienced skaters, they have this unusually large muscle band on the front part of their shins. From lifting the toes, I think.
excellent cross-trainingrussw19
Dec 29, 2003 10:23 PM
I developed those muscles from cycling... but I started racing at 14... I didn't take up hockey until I was 21.

Russ
re: Inline Skatingpurplepaul
Dec 29, 2003 6:43 PM
Inline skating is about the most intense training I've ever done (hold on, though, my new treadmill gets delivered tomorrow).

By indoor, I assume you are referring to doing crossovers around an oval track. Your legs will get immensely powerful, but, unless you practice turning right as much as left (something that is almost never done), you'll be using your right leg quite differently from your left.

As I've stated in earlier discussions of inlining, I found that it allowed me to drop even experienced cyclists on hills. The problem is that skating hard is a masochistic suffer-fest.
re: Inline SkatingFez
Dec 29, 2003 8:22 PM
-----

"As I've stated in earlier discussions of inlining, I found that it allowed me to drop even experienced cyclists on hills."

So that's what I should do to become a better climber???

"The problem is that skating hard is a masochistic suffer-fest."

Doesn't have to be - depends on technique. For those who are well versed in both sports, they can do either in an easy or very hard fashion.
re: Inline Skatingpurplepaul
Dec 29, 2003 8:51 PM
- "So that's what I should do to become a better climber??? " -

Sure wouldn't hurt. Well, let me rephrase that. It will shock the hell out of the guys who used to drop you when they no longer can.

- "Doesn't have to be - depends on technique. For those who are well versed in both sports, they can do either in an easy or very hard fashion." -

Skating is almost all technique. There are some very overweight skaters who can totally kick butt indoors. Outdoors, if you're going to try to hang with Chad Hedrick, you're going to suffer like no one ever has. Does Chad suffer? Yes, he does. But, since nobody has his ability, he doesn't have to reach quite so deep.

Perhaps I just haven't spent enough time doing it, but I found trying to hang with a fast pack of skaters WAY harder than hanging with a fast pack of cyclists. Since you're supporting your whole body while skating, it's just more exhausting than riding a bike. I've come close on a bike to reaching my highest heart rate, but trying to skate fast up a hill still holds the record at 205.
205! How old were you when you did that?russw19
Dec 29, 2003 10:32 PM
When I was 21 and in a lot better shape I actually wore my HRM one day in hockey practice. I hit 198 and I felt like my lungs were going to explode. It was a sprint practice and someone on my team actually threw up after the drill.

Russ
35purplepaul
Dec 29, 2003 10:49 PM
But that was over a year ago. I pretty much devoted all of last year to riding and I got my heart rate up to 201 a few times.

For the most part, though, my max is 186. I have to REALLY hate the guy behind me to approach 200.
Whoa!Fez
Dec 30, 2003 6:50 AM
PPP

"Skating is almost all technique."

Skating is a lot technique, but it is also a lot conditioning and strength. Bad technique can make you horribly inefficient, but even with good technique you are going to be working really hard - you just go faster.

"Outdoors, if you're going to try to hang with Chad Hedrick, you're going to suffer like no one ever has. Does Chad suffer? Yes, he does. But, since nobody has his ability, he doesn't have to reach quite so deep."

This Chad guy is probably the most accomplished inline speedskater ever. He's an Olympic caliber athlete (currently training on ice for the Winter Games). Making a statement like yours is almost analagous to saying if you're going to try to hang with Lance and U.S. Postal on a bike ride. Not possible for most cyclists on this board.

"Perhaps I just haven't spent enough time doing it, but I found trying to hang with a fast pack of skaters WAY harder than hanging with a fast pack of cyclists."

Probably. If you don't skate much, of course it will be hard to keep up. I'm sure the reverse is true. A guy who skates all the time will probably have trouble on his bike keeping up with a fast group of bikers. Someone who is skilled and trains in both sports would probably have no problem.

Eric Heiden comes to mind, but I doubt he was training in both sports simultaneously when he was competing.