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merckx56 and other Merckx frame fans(9 posts)

merckx56 and other Merckx frame fansOverhill
Nov 11, 2003 8:46 AM
I read the recent thread re Cannondale and light aluminum frame durability. What is the relative life expectancy of the Merckx aluminim bikes versus similar aluminum frames? Does the scandium in the Team SC bike add to its lasting strength? Also, question about riding bad roads: Does the scandium [or the geometry] change the Merckx Team ride characteristics, as compared to other high end aluminum bikes, particularly on rough roads? Is this a frame that would endure 5 to 10 years of hard riding: say, 5000 to 10000 miles per year, non racing? Appreciate your experiences and observations. Thanks.
You'll find these articles interestingChicago_Steve
Nov 11, 2003 8:54 AM
EFBe is a German testing lab and also makes test stands for the bicycle industry. The article link below is a frame material shootout between the most common frame materials (steel, aluminum, Ti, carbon). While it is a few years old it is still a VERY interesting read and blows away some of the common misconceptions about aluminum being fragile and steel being indestructable...

http://www.efbe.de/etour109.htm

Also recent comparisons on frame weight and strength (Check out the Specialized Roubaix and CAAD 7 info!)

http://www.efbe.de/erenn.htm
efbe is bunk...hackmechanic
Nov 11, 2003 5:24 PM
Talk to a qualified mechanical engineer about fatigue charactoristics of different materials and the answer you get every time will be that steel and ti are more resistant to fatigue related failures if applied correctly. The efbe test exists outside the design parameters of the real world applications of bike frames. Bike frames are just never stressed in the same manner as the efbe test.

For a more qualified and fully informative description of the shortcomings of the efbe test go here: http://www.anvilbikes.com/story.php?news_ID=9&catID=3

Doesn't mean an aluminum bike will necessarily fail in 3 years, there's plenty of old Cannondales out there that prove that. Bikes will last as long as they are designed to last.
re: merckx56 and other Merckx frame fansbianchi boy
Nov 11, 2003 5:54 PM
I am pretty certain that the Merckx Team SC has only a 2-year warranty. This is pretty standard for all the superlight aluminum frames. These frames dent very easily. They are very light, stiff racing frames that supposedly ride very nice, but durability is not their strong point.

BTW, I've got two Merckx frames -- titanium and steel. I am certain that these frames will last for many, many years. If you're looking for a long-lasting frame, get steel, titanium, carbon or one of the "heavier" aluminum models.
re: merckx56 and other Merckx frame fansgtx
Nov 11, 2003 8:45 PM
I'd consider the Team SC to be a disposable race frame. And I'd be leary of the fork--especially the steerer (who is building the forks for these, anyway?). I have a steel Merckx that is 15 years old and it has tons of miles on it. If you want it to last and don't race get a steel one.
I agree...I love my Corsa Extrarussw19
Nov 11, 2003 11:48 PM
I have never raced it, nor would I, but the thing is almost 20 years old now. It's an 85 with Super Record. It's also the smoothest bike I own as far as ride quality goes. It's not my lightest, and it's not even my favorite, but it's sweet and rides like a dream. I just like a few of my more modern bikes a little better because they are new and trendy, but once in a while I like to take it out on rides and act like I am still 15 and drooling over my first Super Record bike.

Russ
red sidewall tires, white hoods.. yeah. nice.nmcolker
Nov 12, 2003 5:30 AM
nm
Tires are actually red while and blue...russw19
Nov 12, 2003 8:34 AM
They are the Michelin Tour de France edition. Red sidewall, white side tread and blue top tread. The only problem was that the white looked bad after the first ride, but I have a couple extra pairs of them.

The only bad thing about that bike is that I lost the rear Colbato stone on a ride last month, and I have no idea where so I can't go back and look for it.

Anyone know where to get one of those? And what glue to use to make it stay in there?

Russ
bicycle classics?rufus
Nov 12, 2003 6:46 PM
I think that's the name. and as far as i know, you're not the only one that this has happened to. probably it's rarer to see the brakes with the stone than without.