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Mag Trainer vs. Fluid Trainer(6 posts)

Mag Trainer vs. Fluid TrainerJELLIOTWELLS
Sep 17, 2003 7:00 AM
Can anyone tell me what the advantages of having a mag versus a fluid trainer are. My understanding is that a fluid trainer provides more even resistance. What will I be sacrificing if I get a mag trainer? Is there such a thing as a cheap fluid trainer or is this something one should not cheap out on?
Fluid feels more like riding.Spoke Wrench
Sep 17, 2003 8:00 AM
Most of the resistance you feel when riding on the road is air resistance. It increases as the square of your speed.

Mag trainers resistance increases as a direct function of speed. Fluid trainers resistance increases as the square of speed so they feel more like riding on the road.

The drawback to fluid trainers is that they use fluid. If the seals go, they can make a big oily mess on your oriental rug.
Fluid feels more like riding.dave woof
Sep 17, 2003 8:24 AM
I use a 1UPUsa trainer. It's actually friction against a thick pad. Sounds odd but it works extremely well. About $300 mail order only but it's the best one I've seen. The construction is very good.

Dave
re: Mag Trainer vs. Fluid TrainerMR_GRUMPY
Sep 17, 2003 10:22 AM
I've had a Performance adjustable fluid trainer for over three years now, without a problem. When you crank it up to max, it's almost too hard. Hard enough for sprints, or hill repeats standing up.
Ps. they are made by Elite, from Italy.
re: Mag Trainer vs. Fluid TrainerEric F
Sep 17, 2003 3:40 PM
are both of these quiet? I want a trainer to ride while I watch price is right between classes every day
House or apartment?Spoke Wrench
Sep 17, 2003 4:41 PM
Both mag and fluid trainers are lots quieter than the air resistance versions, but quiet is a relative term. If you live in an apartment building you may get some training advice from your downstairs neighbor that you feel is anotomically impossible.