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SAG 101(44 posts)

SAG 101JS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:37 AM
this weekend was our club's "event" century. i've never worked at a SAG before, and figured since we get enough century rides in training for longer and more difficult stuff, and since i'm active in the club structure this year, i might oughtta lend a hand.

my preference was to work as roving support, but i volunteered a bit late, and was assigned SAG duties instead. this was a pretty cool job. i was workin' SAG 3 at mile 43 on the century route; next year i hope to help out at the next to last SAG, at mile 84 (where folks come through suffering all day).

more pics to follow with narrative.
suppliesJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:46 AM
the SAG master had me working #3 with him, and i asked a few days before if i could pickup anything along the way. note to self: never ask if you can pickup anything along the way.

we expected around 100 riders to come through our stop.

~24 pounds of bananas
50+ oranges
two watermelons
~125 fig newtons
case of raisins
case of oreo cookies
case of brownies
27 pounds of ice
two large canisters of gatorade powder
two full large water coolers
a 10-gallon water jug (refilled once)
SPF 45 sunblock
2 large bags of trail mix

I also brought chairs, an extra water cooler (listed above but not requested), a large tarp, an extra ice chest, and some other stuff.
watermelon is the BEST sag food!theBreeze
Sep 15, 2003 5:47 AM
There was watermelon at a sag 2/3rds the way through a century I rode a week ago. Even though the temps were cool it was the best tasting thing there.
watermelon was the only thing not transported to the next sag nmJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:40 AM
SAG wagonJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:48 AM
my element made for the *perfect* SAG transport. the next day i removed all the gear and stuff, then sprayed down the floor and tailgate with 409 and mopped it out. good as new.
now THAT'S a fine pair of melons!JS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:49 AM
M-M-M-M.. watermelon...cyclopathic
Sep 15, 2003 3:40 PM
:)
re: SAG 101Memphis CC
Sep 15, 2003 5:52 AM
You guys did a great job Saturday. I could have used an umbrella though!!
re: rainbrellaJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:42 AM
I brought a waterproof hat. **everything** on me, in my car, and at the SAG was 100% soaked. my chairs are still drying. glad you enjoyed the ride! btw those IP MS jerseys are very nice. i'm looking forward to next weekend.
re: rainbrellaMemphis CC
Sep 15, 2003 7:02 AM
At one point during the heaviest of the rain, I looked down and saw water coming OUT of my shoes. When I got back to the finish my bike was covered in road grit. Spent about an hour yesterday getting it all spruced up again for next weekend, look forward to seeing you Sat.
re: rainbrellaMemphis CC
Sep 15, 2003 7:10 AM
At one point during the heaviest of the rain, I looked down and saw water coming OUT of my shoes. When I got back to the finish my bike was covered in road grit. Spent about an hour yesterday getting it all spruced up again for next weekend, look forward to seeing you Sat.
it was an overcast, windy day, threatening rainJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:54 AM
flags observed on the 40+ minute drive from SAG 1 to SAG 3. it was a tail/cross wind for riders on the way out, and you know what that means for the return leg. at least, that's how it looked "from off the bike".
SAG 3 assembledJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:56 AM
here's the SAG master (E.D.) after we've arrived in the middle of absolutely nowhere and setup SAG 3. yes, we're on the roadside at the edge of a cemetary.
the spreadJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 5:58 AM
having done a couple supported rides before, i remembered a fondness for organized SAG tables (from a rider's perspective). make it so.
re: SAG 101Mariowannabe
Sep 15, 2003 6:07 AM
Great looking spread. What I appreciate at a stop is paper towel and tissue. Got to clean sweat off the glasses, and wipe the hands after eating the oranges!!
had it, mostlyJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:44 AM
had paper towels (sponge bob print) and napkins. meant to get a pack of baby wipes, but forgot as i bought ice at the grocery that AM. everything else came from Sam's (warehouse club), and i didn't need 4000 wipes.
finally, customers!JS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:07 AM
the SAG master had guessed about 10:15 for the first few riders through. i figured earlier. the ride started at 8 AM and we were at mile 43, third stop. riding, i would have skipped SAG 1 and probably SAG 2. if we had a pack traveling at 21+ mph skipping the first 2 stops, my math worked out for 9:50. the first few came through at 10:10 and left at 10:15; they were all on "tri bikes" and talking about ironman training. they had 10 minutes on the "roadie" pack.

this is a pic of the SAG in business, not the front pack.

incidentally, there were two "world champions" riding somewhat together on the day. i got a picture of them posing with each other, but modesty prevents me from posting it.
Wow, Mario himself stopped for some oreos! nmnoveread
Sep 16, 2003 9:48 AM
repair items, too?DougSloan
Sep 15, 2003 6:08 AM
A well fitted sag should have a floor pump, extra tubes, and some tools, too. Canned wipies (official new parent term) would be good. Would be nice to have a rack to haul in those who can't continue for whatever reason.

Doug
yupJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:48 AM
had floor pump, 6 tubes, full roadside toolset plus topeak alien and a military leatherman. i have a 2-bike roof rack and could carry 1-2 more in the vehicle, and E.D. had two mounts in his truck bed. i forgot the "wipies", but meant to purchase and bring some. luckily, there was no mechanical support or bike/rider extraction required at our SAG.
excellent nmDougSloan
Sep 15, 2003 6:55 AM
TNSquared dropped by for a visitJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:10 AM
he rode 130 miles with us DC idiots in B'ham last saturday after 7 months on the bike, so of course he's out riding 100 miles this saturday. this is the jersey that prompted mrs. tn2 to exclaim, "I can't believe a grown man would leave the house dressed like that!" personally i like the mapei jersey, and it's now a bit of history.
TN2's new 'cross bikeJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:12 AM
out for its longest shakedown ride...a fine looking celeste steed.
Pretty bike..me likey...me want one(nm)SpecialTater
Sep 15, 2003 6:35 AM
b
or as my wife says, my new mistress....lol! (nm)TNSquared
Sep 15, 2003 7:30 AM
Now THAT is a fine bike....The Walrus
Sep 15, 2003 11:03 AM
...trust me, you'll love it. Wish I could find a second one!
road, 'cross, fixie candidate - very happy with it so far!TNSquared
Sep 15, 2003 1:01 PM
bianchi (reparto corse) sl cyclocross steel- it's schweet! found this one on ebay. two short training rides and a century and love it so far. it's been ridden hard, but is in good shape and just needs a little TLC. such a versatile bike, reminds alot of the surly cross check. I may even turn it into a fixie in a few years.

I've ordered a bunch of cross and other new parts, and I can't wait to set it up for 'cross. will post more in a few weeks when I get it set up.
Hmmmm--wonder if you're the one who outbid me...The Walrus
Sep 15, 2003 5:44 PM
...at least it found a good home. ...but please,
i please
--not a fixie!
Don't know - there have been several on ebay lately....TNSquared
Sep 15, 2003 7:58 PM
but if this is the one rest assured that I will take very good care it. And since you feel so strongly about it, I promise not to make it a fixie - at least not anytime soon. :) I really do like the versatility this frame offers, though.
then it rainedJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:13 AM
and rainedJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:14 AM
and it rained more, and big wet drops this timeJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:15 AM
closed for remodelingJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:17 AM
we closed shop when the last hundred milers came through. i packed up all the food and remaining water, then drove to the next-to-last SAG to resupply and lend a hand.
good housekeepingJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:19 AM
ok, so they said i gave the SAG a "woman's touch", which i'm not sure was a compliment or no, since i'm a dude. when i arrived, there was no uniformity or organization, just stuff strewn everywhere. at mile 84, nobody wants to hunt for oreo cookies. so be it.
You're a dude???SpecialTater
Sep 15, 2003 6:32 AM
That explains the facial hair.
shave my stumps, not my mug nmJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:49 AM
TNSquared, almost home (last pic)JS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:23 AM
TN2 appeared to have been dropped by his century companion, which surprised the heck outta me. he pulled into the mile 84 SAG about 10 minutes later, with "B" in tow. "B" had never done as much as 100 miles before. she told me--without making a big announcement--that she'd have taken a ride in the broom wagon if not for TN2, and credited him solely for her successful ride.

good on ya, TN2. you're catching on fast.
All in a day's work....:-)TNSquared
Sep 15, 2003 8:03 AM
84 miles with 16 to go is so much easier than 84 with 50 to go,which is where I was the previous week! Helping "B" finish her first century (her prior long ride was 75 miles) was a blast. I had no particular goal going into this ride other than to enjoy it, but when I reached the 45 mile SAG with an 18.8 average and feeling great, I entertained thoughts of shooting to break 19. However, that is the point where I picked up B, and I quickly changed my plans to support her in her first century attempt. It was great to have a chance to "pay forward" all the pacing and other help I've received in the last 6 months, primarily from J.


A heavy downpour from miles 55-80 slowed us, and at about 75 miles B started to bonk pretty hard, but she never once complained. I noticed my original ride partner "M" looking over his shoulder and waiting for us, so I encouraged him to go on, and boy did he. He blazed the last 20 miles at something well over 20 mph to finish with an 18.9 average - his first century. I stayed with B the rest of the way. I know she was really hurting for the last 20 miles, but like a real champ she was determined to make her goal, which was to finish by 3:00 p.m. We passed 100 miles at 2:45 and found that we had some "bonus" miles yet to go!! :-0

Numbers for the ride

104.3 miles
17.1 average
6:05 on the bike
7:00 total elapsed ride time

2 long stops were for a flat at mile 8 (me), and a phone call and recuperation break at the 84 mile SAG for B. I learned that CO2 inflators don't work too well with 36mm valve stems and 23mm rims. After blowing two cartridges all over the rim, I used a frame pump to inflate to about 60 psi and rode to the next SAG for a floor pump. I also learned that riding in the rain is really fun, but cleaning up the bike afterwards is not. Most importantly, though, I was reminded how great it is to help others to achieve something they aren't sure they can accomplish.

The course was beautiful and there was very little traffic, and as you can see - great SAGS. Next year, they just need to add some hills!
final thoughtsJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 6:27 AM
this was rewarding work, though not challenging in the least. all required was a capable vehicle and passenger, the ability to organize a bit, and a willingness to spend saturday morning and afternoon "working" instead of riding.

it was entertaining and a harsh reminder to see people dragging up the tail end of the century "pack" more than an hour behind the front, suffering mightily. this is where you'll find the big hearts and depth of soul.

it's a good gig if you get the chance.

-J
oh, andJS Haiku Shop
Sep 15, 2003 7:09 AM
* $120 to run SAG 2, in case you wanted perspective. there was lots of sugary food left, half a water dispenser, a tree full of bananas, one full GORP bag, and other stuff. these things resupplied the 84-mile SAG.

* one panicked HAM radio operator sent for 10 more gallons of water. the estimate was one water cooler and one 10-gallon container for refill, plus 18-24 pounds of ice. reality was two full water coolers and 15 gallons of replenishment, plus 27 pounds of ice.

* 9 hours from leaving my driveway to returning

* 10 gallons of dino juice

* one rider transported in the J-mobile from the last SAG to the parking lot (<8 miles, and i checked in for that reason on my way home). she had a flat tire and didn't want to ride wet roads any more.

more afterthoughts: volunteers are always needed, but cyclists working at and running SAGs are the best suggestion. nobody knows what a rider is going through, better than someone who's been there.

music is good.

don't forget your own lunch.

also: a vehicle parked near a SAG table is a bike and water bottle magnet.
"...this is where you'll find the big hearts and depth of soul."Len J
Sep 15, 2003 7:44 AM
Truer words have rarely been spoken.

When I did the Alaska AIDS ride, the truly inspiring were those who kept trudging on, for personal motivation, in spite of horrible conditions.

At the end of every day, usually around 6:30 pm or later, an announcement would reverberate through the PA system......."The last rider is approaching the camp!" Simotaneously, everyone in camp would stand up and start cheering, not stopping until the last rider walked through the dining tent. Imagine, you have been on the road for 11 or 12 hours, and as you get within 1/4 mile of camp, you hear what turns into cheering as you get closer and closer. It still gives me goosebumps, but is a fitting tribut to those with, as you say: "big hearts and depth of soul."

Great job on the SAG. Wish I still lived in Memphis, or you lived on the Eastern Shore.

Len
"...this is where you'll find the big hearts and depth of soul."Len J
Sep 15, 2003 7:45 AM
Truer words have rarely been spoken.

When I did the Alaska AIDS ride, the truly inspiring were those who kept trudging on, for personal motivation, in spite of horrible conditions.

At the end of every day, usually around 6:30 pm or later, an announcement would reverberate through the PA system......."The last rider is approaching the camp!" Simotaneously, everyone in camp would stand up and start cheering, not stopping until the last rider walked through the dining tent. Imagine, you have been on the road for 11 or 12 hours, and as you get within 1/4 mile of camp, you hear what turns into cheering as you get closer and closer. It still gives me goosebumps, but is a fitting tribute to those with, as you say: "big hearts and depth of soul."

Great job on the SAG. Wish I still lived in Memphis, or you lived on the Eastern Shore.

Len
final thoughtssnapdragen
Sep 15, 2003 5:26 PM
I agree, Sagging is rewarding. I do it twice a year for my club's academy graduation. Only 10-15 riders, doing their first metric century, but boy is it great to see the pride on their faces when they finish.
That's an impressive spread...biknben
Sep 15, 2003 7:24 AM
I was at a wedding on Saturday. You're spread looks far more enjoyable than the one I saw at the country club.

Yes...I well organized sag is refreshing to see when your not feeling very fresh on the bike.

Good work!!!