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Body heat loss and perfrmnce. Results of initial search.(2 posts)

Body heat loss and perfrmnce. Results of initial search.theBreeze
Sep 9, 2003 7:40 AM
Here's one article I found so far.

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of environmental cooling on force production in the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. Ten men (mean ± SD: age = 21.4 ± 2.2 years, height = 168.5 ± 35.9 cm, body mass = 78.0 ± 6.4 kg) participated in this study. Each subject completed 2 sets of 10 maximal effort repetitions on a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at 3.14 rad·s1. Between sets, subjects sat in environmental temperatures of 20, 15, 10, or 5° C for 40 minutes. A significant decrease (p 0.05) was observed in the pre- to postcooling peak torque values at 10° C and 5° C for both quadriceps and hamstrings. A significant decrease (p 0.05) was also observed in the pre- to postcooling average torque values for the hamstrings at 10° C and 5° C. A significant increase (p 0.05) in the amount of heat loss from the quadriceps and hamstrings occurred as environmental temperatures decreased. Force production of the quadriceps and hamstrings is significantly decreased when the body experiences environmental temperatures at or below 10° C for at least 40 minutes. A significant amount of heat loss also occurred from the quadriceps and hamstrings as environmental temperature decreased. The take-home message is that after a certain period of time exposed to cool ambient temperatures, performance may be decreased and warm-up time will increase.

Reference Data:Comeau, M.J., J.A. Potteiger, and L.E. Brown. Effects of environmental cooling on force production in the quadriceps and hamstrings. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 279–284.

They record significant heat loss occurs from lower body muscles. We alway think about protecting the core, but keeping those legs warm may be just as important.
Second referencetheBreeze
Sep 9, 2003 7:42 AM
"Effects of Cold Immersion on Muscle Stength"

ABSTRACT

This study examined the effects of cold water immersion on isokinetic and isometric strength on 10 physically active male college students. Isokinetic knee extension strength (30,180,300, and 400 · sec1) and isometric strength were assessed. Isometric testing consisted of 5-see isometric knee extension muscle actions at a 45° angle. Subjects randomly performed all three treatment conditions: a cold treatment (12°C), thermal neutral treatment (35.5°C), or nonimmersion room temperature treatment (22–23°C). For the cold and thermal neutral treatments both thighs were immersed in a whirlpool tank with moving water leveled to each subject's gluteal fold. Treatments lasted 45 min. Higher isokinetic velocities demonstrated a significant decrease in average peak torque, average power, and total work. No significant changes were observed for isometric force or low velocity movements. No significant decreases were observed for the angle of peak torque or for time to peak torque. This study demonstrated that if the thighs are immersed in cold water, functional strength performance at higher movement velocities will be impaired.

The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research: Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 129–133.

Note the statement "functional strength performance at higher movement velocities will be impaired." Seems most applicable to cycling. We certainly had "cold water immersion" on Sunday!