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Switching to a double....a little nervous.(17 posts)

Switching to a double....a little nervous.LowCel
Aug 25, 2003 11:41 AM
I just ordered a new bike and it is coming with a double on it. The bike is a Giant TCR Composite 1 if that matters. Anywho, I have never ridden anything but a triple before so I am a little worried about it. I also ordered a 12-27 cassette so hopefully that will help out some. I probably wouldn't be so worried about it but I live in West Virginia. Everywhere you look there are climbs.

Anyway, I guess I'm just wondering how long it took everyone here to get used to the double and to build up the strength to use it. I already find myself up out of the saddle on a lot of climbs with my triple.
Do the math. Are your ratios comparable? Your expensiveSpunout
Aug 25, 2003 11:45 AM
carbon frame will fall over from lack of pedaling like any other bike when you can't climb with it. If it is five pounds lighter than your current bike, you won't be able to tell the difference, except if you're walking it up the climb.

Gear ratios can be discovered by dividing front small ring by largest rear cassette. Small numbers are easier gears.
Do the math. Are your ratios comparable? Your expensiveLowCel
Aug 25, 2003 11:54 AM
Guess if all else fails I could get a 39 front ring. Hoping this will make me stronger.

Thanks for the support though. Oh yeah, I'm still looking for an answer to my question in your reply. You know...how long did it take to get used to the double.
BTW, wasn't that expensive. (nm)LowCel
Aug 25, 2003 11:56 AM
I wouldn't worry about it for one second...No_sprint
Aug 25, 2003 12:00 PM
The only triple I ever had was on a mountain bike. There are tons of steep hills where I'm at and there aint one I can't climb with my 39/25.
Thanks, appreciate the infoLowCel
Aug 25, 2003 12:03 PM
My lowest is going to be 39/27 so hopefully I can swing it. I'm hoping that riding the double will help me with mtb racing.

thanks again
39/27 will climb wallsfiltersweep
Aug 25, 2003 12:43 PM
Don't worry about it... a triple would simply look wrong on that frame anyway. You should be fine- most people use a 23... and a 25 bails them out... and you are bailed with a 27?! No problem. You can probably ride almost anywhere in your big ring.
i think i'll go with a 29 then. ;) nmrufus
Aug 25, 2003 1:02 PM
29 will climb overhangs ?.Look381i
Aug 25, 2003 3:28 PM
if a 27 will climb walls. My experience, though, is that on Mont Ventoux I wished I had mounted a 34.
It will work just fineLeroy
Aug 25, 2003 1:36 PM
If you go with a 25 of 27 [or higher] large cog you will be close to a triple bailout granny gear anyway. Don't worry about it.
re: Switching to a double....a little nervous.Spyky
Aug 25, 2003 1:40 PM
I swapped my triple (first road bike) for a double after a few months of riding. I lived in a fairly flat (but windy) area so the stock 12-23 was fine. Then I moved to south western Virginia not far from WV. I changed to a 12-27 (39 small ring). It keeps me spinning on hills that used to have me standing. There is nothing here I can't get up (even if I do
have to stand on occasion). I think you should be happy with the 27.

-Spyky
re: Switching to a double....a little nervous.MShaw
Aug 25, 2003 3:59 PM
Back in school when I weighed 155#, I'd be climbing the hills around Blacksburg in the 42x24 and thought I was the cat's meow. Now that I'm 30# heavier and live in San Diego, I get away with a 39x23 most of the time.

Mike
re: Switching to a double....a little nervous.aliensporebomb
Aug 25, 2003 1:55 PM
When I first got my Aluminum TCR I was about 230 pounds and
apprehensive myself.

That bike is so light it took no time at all to get used to
and I'm closing in on 200 pounds because of it.

You won't want to ride anything else, trust me.

Congrats on the new bike.
It depends........Len J
Aug 26, 2003 3:22 AM
what gears do you use to climb now?

If you are doing most of your climbing in the middle ring, then you'll probably be OK. If most of your climbing is in the little ring, at the easier end of the cassette, then I suspect that the double is going to be very tough on you.

Be careful with your knees in the switch, you may be putting extra pressure on them with the double (compared to the triple).

BTW, why switch? What was the logic? If the triple worked for you, what was your reasoning for the double?

Len
Thanks everyone.....LowCel
Aug 26, 2003 3:42 AM
As far as why the switch there are a couple of reasons. The main one being that I want to become a stronger mountain bike rider. The other reason is that I had to get a new bike so I sold my K2 roadie. The shop that I ride for is not a K2 dealer. The K2 was a little too big anyway. When I was looking at the new bikes I saw the composite Giant that the shop owner is riding and fell in love with it. Since the bike is only available in a double there really wasn't much choice in the matter. Especially since I have been considering making the switch anyway.
some advicetarwheel
Aug 26, 2003 5:42 AM
Go to this link at Sheldon Brown's website. It's an online gear calculator.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

Figure out what low gear combination you need with your current triple, and then find out the equivalent ratio using a double. Make sure your double has a 39 small ring, and not a 42 if you in West Virginia. If you go with a Shimano group, your lowest standard gear combination will be 39/27. If Campy, your lowest is 39/29. I've got bikes equipped with Shimano and Campy groups and notice a big difference between the 27 and 29 low gears. I rode my Shimano bike in the mountains a few weeks ago and was climbing out of the saddle a lot in the 39/27 combination on steeper sections. This past weekend, I rode a similar route in the mountains using my Campy bike w/ 39/29 and did every climb seated except for one brief section.

A lot of skinny guys can get by with a 23 or 25 as their lowest gear. But if you ride a lot in the mountains and aren't a skinny little dude, go for a 27 or 29.
some adviceLowCel
Aug 26, 2003 11:37 AM
Thank ya. 12-27 cassette is already at the shop waiting for the bike. It will be put on it before I ever even ride the bike. The front is a 39. Guess that's the best it's going to get.

Thanks again