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Turbotrainers: Good for you, bad for bike?(3 posts)

Turbotrainers: Good for you, bad for bike?huffer
Aug 2, 2003 2:08 PM
Colder weather is only a few months away (dammit), and I was thinking of using a turbotrainer this winter to keep fit, instead of the sationary bike I used last year. I want to use the same bike I ride outdoors on the trainer, but my concern is that this will end up trashing the headset(or other parts) because of the extra stress placed on the bike from it being locked into a straight upright position. The bike would be ridden hundreds of miles in this fixed postion. This has got to be bad for the bike, right?
Yes & probably not, but a suggestion...cory
Aug 3, 2003 6:13 PM
My singlespeed, which started life nearly 20 years ago as a 15-speed Trek tourer, has been my trainer bike for five or six years. It's a medium-decent frame (Reynolds 531), but nothing special. No sign of any problems in heavy use by a Clydesdale on the road in summer and in the den in winter.
On the other hand, I'd be a little leery of putting one of my good bikes in that thing. I don't believe it would hurt it, but....
What a lot of people do is pick up an old bike at someplace like the Salvation Army, and use that on the trainer. It would cost $20-$30 where I live, and it doesn't have to do much. If you can approximate your ordinary position and keep air in the rear tire, that's about all you need. Actually that's what the Trek did for a couple of years until I decided to convert to SS.
Thanks Cory, what I'll probably do is...huffer
Aug 3, 2003 7:45 PM
get myself a junker to train on in the winter. I don't want to risk trashing a Chris King headset or Ouzo Pro fork, so I'll just burn through a few Road Masters or whatever. Lots cheaper to replace.