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Recovery from a front wheel hit?(9 posts)

Recovery from a front wheel hit?paulg
Jul 2, 2003 4:37 PM
I was riding this AM with one of my training partners and as we went up this short steep hill, I was in front and his front wheel contacted my rear. Not surprisingly, he went down in an instant.

There were a couple times before that he seemed to be half-lapping me, but then would drop back. I thought about cautioning him, but I felt that he was already cognizant of the danger.

My question is - if in the unfortunate situation of making such contact, what would have been his best option to recover out of it without crashing? Should he have continued to steer into my wheel until we were separated? Or steer away? Is it possible to recover balance at all?

Thanx in advance for any pointers!

Paul
Gonna have to try that....asphalt assault
Jul 2, 2003 5:14 PM
A friend and I who I frequently ride MTB with are always bumping in that manner as well as shoulder and elbow banging...we call it full contact mountain biking, hehehe. I ride road with the same dude but we'v never tried bumping as we do on MTBs, now you'v got me curious as to how a road bike will react to a little wheel rubbing.

I'd think the key to recovery is not to panic, just back off the pedals and neither steer away or towards the wheel. Also a little practice would help to see how your front will react. You'l have to find an adventurious friend to practice with I suppose...lotsa' folks might not like to play these little games.

BTW, my friend and I HAVE ended up laying in the weeds on occasion after making contact...all in good fun of course.
A little hint...Lone Gunman
Jul 3, 2003 5:05 PM
Riding rollers sharpens your handling skills, often you make balance "saves" while riding rollers. Also helps when road riding goes off road and onto the berm. The aquired skills transfer over to the road.
Always steer into itKerry Irons
Jul 2, 2003 5:25 PM
It's "impossible" to steer away from this sort of thing, as the rider behind is already leaning toward the wheel in front, so the center of gravity has shifted toward the center line of the lead bike. You can't steer out of a situation like that. Just like when teaching kids how to ride a bike: steer toward the fall.
practiceYoungRcR
Jul 2, 2003 5:57 PM
its actually alot of fun to get on some grass and hit each other (on your road bikes). practice tapping your front to his rear and vice-versa, practice giving hard shoulders, elbows, get 3 guys and play sandwich (two riders ride shoulder to shoulder nearly and the 3rd tries to squeeze between them) its fun stuff. REally any kind of excercise that teaches you how to instinctly react to contact because it does work. stay loose and confident and you will have a blast.
Ditto.MR_GRUMPY
Jul 2, 2003 6:35 PM
If you steer away from it, you will always eat it. If you steer into it, the worst thing that can happen is that your front wheel might go into his cassette.......Blam....
Always steer into itIronbutt
Jul 2, 2003 6:40 PM
Even better, lean into the wheel that is making contact with your front wheel. If possible get out of the saddle and stand on the pedals, and use "body English" to stay upright. If you are hit by some blithering twit who is making sudden swerves around patches of sand on the road, though, you are going down. I know about these things and would not lie to you.
re: Stand UP to recovercyclopathic
Jul 2, 2003 6:58 PM
this is advice I've been given to after I crashed riding with overlap. Haven't had chance to try it, and not planning to ;)
re: Recovery from a front wheel hit?paulg
Jul 3, 2003 2:13 AM
Hey, thanks for all your input. It's good to know that there's a way you can have a chance at not going down. I will certainly pass this info along to the guys...and keep it mind for myself also. I feel that leaning more towards the side of prevention, i.e. protecting your space in front, would seem like the best strategy.

Paul