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Endurance events and heart attacks.(4 posts)

Endurance events and heart attacks.GileyD
Jun 10, 2003 4:36 AM
The following article is from the Guardian newspaper here in the UK. Interesting reading.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,3605,974072,00.html
I dont subscribe.Steve_0
Jun 10, 2003 5:18 AM
These people may have died far sooner without their endurance-based background.

Case in point: My father, longtime runner, bike enthusiast, and general heathfood freak starting experiencing minor chest pains while exceeding anerobic threshold. I think he was 48 at the time. After several months, he went to a cardiologist.

Cardiologist sent him to the hospital for the dye, 'just to be safe'. The hospital wouldnt let him leave; Triple bypass the next morning.

Apparently, because of his athletic background, his vascular system developed small caps AROUND the clogs, which allowed sufficent bloodflow for all but the most demanding efforts. The cardiologist told him that if he hadnt been so active his whole life, he would have died pushing the lawnmower in his 30's or early 40s.

Just one case where endurance training offset poor genetics.
everything in moderationColnagoFE
Jun 10, 2003 6:50 AM
the older i get the more i think this saying makes more sense. i don't think ultra-endurance races and stuff like the Tour de France are probably all that good for a person physically, but 3-4 good rides a week along with a sensible diet, lifting some weights, is probably good for anyone.
What a bunch of rubbish!Kerry
Jun 10, 2003 5:10 PM
It's hard to find more nonsense collected in one place. One heart attack in an allegedly fit person does not make a trend. Adding Fixx's heart problems to the mix does not alter the situation. Being fit and eating well is better than not, no question. Pounding yourself into a pulp is not the same thing as being fit, and you can do FAR more than 5, 30 minute "moderate" sessions per week without risk of doing any damage. This article and the sentiments contained therein is nothing but scare mongering. Sells papers though, and that's what it's all about.