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Knee pain and Q: what is the name of the outside tendon...(7 posts)

Knee pain and Q: what is the name of the outside tendon...Spunout
May 24, 2003 8:22 AM
on the outside of my knee? Not the ITB band, but the small hamstring on the outside? Sorry for the crappy terminology, but I've searched for an hour and cannot get a proper id on this part of my knee.

Once I find out, I'd like to ask about how to fix it! Unfortunately, I fiddle with bike fit, cleat position, etc. and may have screwed up a bit (according to my knees). Bad pain outside of my hamstring, and a bit in front, lower. Most seems to be tibia related.

One thing I did was move my cleats all the way inboard on my shoes, but this may be causing my feet to rock outwards too much, thus lengthening the lateral side of my leg.

Anyone have anything similar happen? I've increased the float on my Look 396 pedals, decreased the tension.
re: Knee pain and Q: what is the name of the outside tendon...russw19
May 24, 2003 9:17 AM
It sounds like you are talking about your LCL, Lateral Collateral Ligament.
Check this site.. it's a good diagram...
http://www.aclsolutions.com/anatomy.php

heres another-

http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/health/qa-knee/kneeqa.htm

Hope that helps you out

Russ
Try this site...Matno
May 24, 2003 10:28 AM
Has some good info that is cycling specific. It helped me...

http://www.cptips.com/knee.htm
Biceps femoris tendonspeedisgood
May 24, 2003 1:30 PM
Sounds like you're putting more stretch on the biceps femoris from the change in cleat position. By shifting your cleat all the way in (which puts your foot further away from the cranks) you do 2 things: 1) increase your Q angle and 2) rotate your tibia in a little to keep your feet pointing forward. As you found out, this will put extra tension on the outside hamstring and will surely cause even more problems if you correct your adjustment.

You might want to put your cleats back to where they were until this clears up (also ice the area for 10-20 min at a time, stretch the hammies gently and take some anti-inflammatories). After that, change your position more gradually so your body has time to adapt to the new position. You could also try rotating your cleats so your heels are a little closer to the cranks, if you can.
^^^Typo. Don't read this one. [nm]speedisgood
May 24, 2003 1:32 PM
Biceps femoris tendonspeedisgood
May 24, 2003 1:31 PM
Sounds like you're putting more stretch on the biceps femoris from the change in cleat position. By shifting your cleat all the way in (which puts your foot further away from the cranks) you do 2 things: 1) increase your Q angle and 2) rotate your tibia in a little to keep your feet pointing forward. As you found out, this will put extra tension on the outside hamstring and will surely cause even more problems if you don't correct your adjustment.

You might want to put your cleats back to where they were until this clears up (also ice the area for 10-20 min at a time, stretch the hammies gently and take some anti-inflammatories). After that, change your position more gradually so your body has time to adapt to the new position. You could also try rotating your cleats so your heels are a little closer to the cranks, if you can.
Thanks, this is what I thought...Spunout
May 24, 2003 3:06 PM
I re-measured my bike and saddle height, I may also be a bit too high. That darn re-build a few weeks ago left my saddle high.

I will also move the cleats back to the centre of their range (Looks: not alot of adjustment anyways).