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On the question of reach to handlebar...(6 posts)

On the question of reach to handlebar...ridingthegyro
May 13, 2003 5:32 AM
Which one of the two methods below is better relative to balancing the bicycle in your opinion, assuming KOP and saddle height are correct? In both cases, the back is straight with hands on the drops and forearms parrallel with head tube.

1. The most forward point (curved part) of the handlebar is in line vertically with the front hub.

2. The handlebar blocks the view of the front hub.

1 and 2 cannot both be met.
Just guidelinesfallzboater
May 13, 2003 6:43 AM
Either of those methods would change your position due to head tube angle and fork rake, neither of which should determine your fit.

-David
Another guideline.dzrider
May 13, 2003 7:45 AM
I agree that the two methods listed are intended to give a reasonable starting point for placing the handle bars and hoods. This is a method I was shown for placing bars and brake hoods.

Put your bike in a stand and pedal til you're warmed up and loose. Still pedalling, sit up straight and put your hands behind your back. Slowly lean forward until you reach a spot where your cadence suddenly picks up a little and leaning further forward becomes much more difficult. Carefully holding your upper body at that angle swing your arms out and then forward with your eyes closed and your arms slightly bent. Your hands should hit your brake hoods and comfortably support your upper body.
I gotta try that! Thanks, dz. (nm)jtferraro
May 13, 2003 7:32 PM
ReachNessism
May 13, 2003 11:25 AM
The real test is how comfortable the position is to you.

As far as a general rule of thumb for a racing position goes, assume a position in the drops and see how much clearance you have between your knees and elbows. You should have a small amount of clearance but not much.

Good luck.

Ed
This question is about weight distribution, not fitridingthegyro
May 14, 2003 12:49 AM