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Cleaning Paint Scuff from Carbon(8 posts)

Cleaning Paint Scuff from Carbonlitesp
Apr 8, 2003 9:34 AM
I just finished putting my TCR composite together, but before I even got it on the road my buddy leaned his bike on mine and left paint scuff marks on the left seat stay. Although there's no damage to the carbon, the contrast of paint against the carbon is annoying. I've tried rubbing the marks with non-abrasive hand cleaner, isopropyl alcohol and paint thinner to no avail. Can someone recommend a safe way to remove the paint scuffs from bare carbon without making matters worse?

I can live with the mark, but it would have been nice to have it looking new for a little while longer.

Thanks
Have you tried...PsyDoc
Apr 8, 2003 10:37 AM
...an automobile rubbing compound or cleaner (like Miguier's 1) that are clearcoat safe? You may also want to contact Giant and see what they recommend.
Post Picture of your new bike please!!!!!!!!!!!!TSuprano
Apr 8, 2003 10:39 AM
Post Picture of your new bike please!!!!!!!!!!!!BaadDawg
Apr 8, 2003 11:46 AM
I'm another TCR Composite owner awaiting a pickup. Let us know what you think and if you have any tips on setup etc.
Post Picture of your new bike please!!!!!!!!!!!!litesp
Apr 8, 2003 4:04 PM
I got the poser color "Team Once". Two other friend got theirs - one blue the other yellow.

FRAME - (small) 992 grams
Cosmetics - 9/10
1. The frame finish is as good as top Italian frames.
Mechanical - 9/10
1. All fixtures, threads and bearing interfaces are secure clean and square.
2. Alignment of front and rear triangle and dropouts are spot on.
3. Extras -
a) Boss for race number on top tube
b) Rubber plug for front derailluer cable to seal where it routes throught the seat tube/BB junction.
c) "Hiddenset-like" headset uses slip in bearing cups instead "True" integrated" by resting cartridge bearings against the headtube. This is also sort of like "zero stack in that there is no risk in wearing out the headtube.
d) Unique steer tube expander device which installs to the steerer using an 8mm allen.
e) Carbon fiber stem cap with Giant logos.
f) Seat clamp with once motif.
g) Protective stickers for all cable to frame contact areas. Clear chainstay guard pre-installed.

FORK - uncut 346 grams, cut for 40mm spacers 302 grams
Cosmetics - 9/10, as good as the frame
Mechanical - 5/10
1. Dropouts were not at the same height, causing a dished wheel to sit to right side. I had to file the dropout to center the wheel. Same problem with other 2 forks.

Assembly
I took it very slowly as to not put a single scratch on the frameset. Everything went together without a hitch, smooth and by the numbers, except the front dropouts.
Tips
1. DON'T grease any carbon surfaces ie. seatpost or steer tube/stem.
2. Steer tube expander will add 1mm to overall length. Carbon fiber cap has a step height of 1.5mm. Take this into account when cutting. Assemble the front end with all bearings, spacers and stem and mark the steer tube. Cut the steer tube 4mm below the mark. This will result in 1.5-2mm space to take up the gap during headset adjustment.
3. Use the rubber plug to seal the frame from dirt and moisture.

The Ride
WOW. I'll save this for another discussion.

I don't have a digital camera yet to take pictures, but I just can't stop looking it.
Post Picture of your new bike please!!!!!!!!!!!!litesp
Apr 9, 2003 9:02 AM
I got the poser color "Team Once". Two other friend got theirs - one blue the other yellow.

FRAME - (small) 992 grams
Cosmetics - 9/10
1. The frame finish is as good as top Italian frames.
Mechanical - 9/10
1. All fixtures, threads and bearing interfaces are secure clean and square.
2. Alignment of front and rear triangle and dropouts are spot on.
3. Extras -
a) Boss for race number on top tube
b) Rubber plug for front derailluer cable to seal where it routes throught the seat tube/BB junction.
c) "Hiddenset-like" headset uses slip in bearing cups instead "True" integrated" by resting cartridge bearings against the headtube. This is also sort of like "zero stack in that there is no risk in wearing out the headtube.
d) Unique steer tube expander device which installs to the steerer using an 8mm allen.
e) Carbon fiber stem cap with Giant logos.
f) Seat clamp with once motif.
g) Protective stickers for all cable to frame contact areas. Clear chainstay guard pre-installed.

FORK - uncut 346 grams, cut for 40mm spacers 302 grams
Cosmetics - 9/10, as good as the frame
Mechanical - 5/10
1. Dropouts were not at the same height, causing a dished wheel to sit to right side. I had to file the dropout to center the wheel. Same problem with other 2 forks.

Assembly
I took it very slowly as to not put a single scratch on the frameset. Everything went together without a hitch, smooth and by the numbers, except the front dropouts.
Tips
1. DON'T grease any carbon surfaces ie. seatpost or steer tube/stem.
2. Steer tube expander will add 1mm to overall length. Carbon fiber cap has a step height of 1.5mm. Take this into account when cutting. Assemble the front end with all bearings, spacers and stem and mark the steer tube. Cut the steer tube 4mm below the mark. This will result in 1.5-2mm space to take up the gap during headset adjustment.
3. Use the rubber plug to seal the frame from dirt and moisture.

The Ride
WOW. I'll save this for another discussion.

I don't have a digital camera yet to take pictures, but I just can't stop looking it.
Don't use alcohol or thinners!Gregory Taylor
Apr 8, 2003 3:30 PM
It can attack the finish on the carbon. I'd try a little bit of "clearcoat safe" automotive polish. Meguires is good. They also make a polish for plastic convertible top windows that might work.
Rubbing compoundCHRoadie
Apr 9, 2003 7:07 AM
Check with Giant, but there's got to be a clearcoat over the carbon. Use rubbing compound to get the mark off, then use wax to seal it.