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Help! ride in morning and trouble with front derailluer(8 posts)

Help! ride in morning and trouble with front derailluerblw
Apr 4, 2003 6:48 PM
I just upgraded to Ultegra 9 speed and was told that the front derailluer wouldn't need to be changed.(It's shimano 600) I have set the limit screws and it seems to work fine in the stand. Then when I take it out on the road it won't shift into the large chainring. Back to the stand--seems to work fine. Out on the road--it won't shift to the large chainring. I have tired to barely adjust the limit screws, but when it seems to shift then it has such a gap that it throws the chain.(I have a nice gouge on my chain stay now and it also jumps off the outside)So, I back it off and then it won't shift. I hope to go on a 70 mile ride in the morning but this is driving me crazy.
Am I missing something? Any help? It can't be this hard can it? Thanks
If all else fails, you might try this....joekm
Apr 4, 2003 7:10 PM
Frankly, even though the front derailluer is the simpler mechanism, it can be the hardest to adjust correctly.
Before trying my last ditch fix, consider the following first.

1) If you have a new crank and chainwheels, you may need to adjust the derailluer height.

2) Check that the derailluer is parallel to the chainring or does not have a deep "chain gouge" cut on the inside. You can play with its orientation slightly to get more aggressive action, but make sure you have chain clearance.

3) Have a trusted bike mechanic look at it.

4) Try other suggestions from this forum other than what I'm about to suggest below.

If all else fails, I've done the following successfully:

Sometimes, with an older front derailluer, it helps to form it into a slight arc so that it will more aggresively throw the chain up on to the taller ring.

Having said this, please do not modify your derailluer arm unless you've tried everything else and/or are prepared to go ahead and get that new Ultegra derailluer in the event that you ruin your current one.
take slack out of cable or...the bull
Apr 4, 2003 7:12 PM
make sure the adjustment on the side that keeps chain moving up (off toward pedal)is letting chain go up enough!
When there is tension on the chain it will make it shift different than on the stand when there is not as much tension.
good luck!
What shifters? Double or triple? (nm)Spoke Wrench
Apr 4, 2003 7:27 PM
Double- (nm)blw
Apr 4, 2003 7:33 PM
You didn't say what shifters.Spoke Wrench
Apr 5, 2003 6:36 AM
I don't think that a 600 derailleur is designed to work with front index shifting. It just occurred to me that 9-speed shifters will be indexed. I think you will need a new front derailleur to make it work satisfactorily.
You didn't say what shifters.blw
Apr 5, 2003 11:29 AM
I have the Ultegra sti shifters. Now that you mention it I can't remember if my shimano 600 sti left shifter was indexed or not.

The thing that frustrates me is that it shifts fine while in the stand. I can't see any problems at all. When I'm on the road it doestn't shift well. I can get it to shift into the large ring, but I have to hesitate and almost nurse it along. I've started over and reset everything at least 3 times. I'm just at a lost what to do.
Here's what I know for sure.Spoke Wrench
Apr 5, 2003 12:50 PM
I had a tandem (with a triple) that I upgraded to 9-speed. The front shifting, after a lot of adjusting, worked OK on the stand, but was unacceptable on the road. As soon as I replaced the front derailleur with a new 9-speed one, the shifting was as slick as any triple I'd ever seen.

I don't have measureing equipment precise enough to tell if there was a cage width difference between the two front derailleurs. It's been several years, so I don't remember if there was a cable anchor difference, but the old derailleur worked fine with 8-speed STI. I do know the shifting was crappy with the old front derailleur and great with the nwe one.