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Leave my bike where?!(3 posts)

Leave my bike where?!NewDayNewWay
Mar 22, 2003 5:03 AM
You need a pit stop at the local gas station, so you dismount your bike, go inside and grab some water and some energy-enriched food. As your paying for the goods, you look up to see a pickup truck with your bike in back speeding out of the parking lot...

End of nightmare! But question... When riding alone, do you worry about leaving your bike outside a convenience store or gas station? Is there any way to ensure that your bike won't get stolen? (Besides trying to keep your eye on the bike the whole time your in the store?) Maybe I should trust people more than I do? (Not!)
City mousefiltersweep
Mar 22, 2003 5:15 AM
Living in the city, I will only leave it outside if I'm riding with a group... otherwise, I'll bring it into the store. I'll take it into restrooms when necessary... I'm enough of an unrecognizable freak in lycra, helmet, sunglasses slip/sliding across the tile floor that I just don't care.... I have no shame. I don't mind sending the message to the world :trust no one:

OR I will bring a tiny seat lock for locking the bike- granted a fingernail clipper could probably cut one of those, but at least it is locked.

Am I paranoid? Probably- but I do live in a city- several years ago a roommate had a mtn bike locked to a railing and the entire rail was ripped from the house/concrete (bike included...).
Try to match the protection to the risk.Spoke Wrench
Mar 22, 2003 6:01 AM
I seldom lock my bike, but I seldom ride anyplace that I percieve to be high or even moderate risk. I also consciously acknowledge to myself that leaving a bicycle unprotected is a risk that I am choosing to accept. Life is too short to live in a constant state of fear.

The first lock that you put onto your bike, however cheesy, is about 90% effective because it forces the thief to come prepared with some kind of tool. To get from 90% to 99% is a game of one-up-manship with the thief in which you both use progressively more sophisticated and heavier equipment. In the end, if he has enough time, the thief always wins. After all, people have found ways to break into bank vaults.