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Why do new road bikes all seem to have vertical dropouts(8 posts)

Why do new road bikes all seem to have vertical dropoutskilimanjaro
Mar 20, 2003 3:44 PM
I noticed that old road frames and new retro style road frames have mostly campy style horizontal dropouts while all "modern" frames have vertical dropouts in the rear. Why?
re: Why do new road bikes all seem to have vertical dropoutsFrith
Mar 20, 2003 3:49 PM
kilimanjaro "Horizontal vs Vertifcal dropouts" 3/11/03 8:34am
re: Why do new road bikes all seem to have vertical dropoutskilimanjaro
Mar 20, 2003 4:12 PM
It's all coming back to me now!
Less likely to slip, easier to align ...Humma Hah
Mar 20, 2003 4:18 PM
We singlespeeders adore horizontal dropouts because they allow us to adjust chain tension. That is almost irrelevant with a derailleur, where the rear der acts as a chain tensioner.

Horizontal dropouts can slip. Singles and fixies tend to use nuts to hold the axel tight enough. QR skewers are prone to slipping in horizontal dropouts.

Putting a wheel back in, it takes a few seconds longer to get the wheel straight with horizontal dropouts. With the verticals, you just drop the wheel in and tighten.
Why do you post the same question only 9 days later? (nm)Kerry
Mar 20, 2003 5:09 PM
Typical 9 minute attention span online (nm)kilimanjaro
Mar 20, 2003 9:17 PM
re: Why do new road bikes all seem to have vertical dropoutsharry hall
Mar 20, 2003 5:15 PM
Several reasons:
1. Modern shifting systems need a pretty fixed relationship between rear axle location and derailleur upper pivot bolt location.
2. Current quick release skewers are TERRIBLE--too light and won't f&*$in' grip!--Salsa and similar crap will slip in a horizontal dropout.
3. Most frames are made more precisely now; horizontal dropouts are more tolerant of less precise rear triangle assembly.
4. Old frame doesn't mean horizontal necessarily; look at some pictures of high-end French touring and randonneur bikes from the 40's to today, Rene Herse was doing vertical dropouts in 1960.
Another reason - crazy short chainstaysRay Sachs
Mar 21, 2003 5:46 AM
Most modern road bikes are racer wannabes and have unbelievably short chainstays. We could argue for days about the pros and cons of short chainstays, but one reality they impose is that you can't slide a wheel out of horizontal dropouts without banging it into the seat tube. Verticals don't have this problem.

Also, modern indexing systems are really precise and need a fairly precise wheel placement. With verticles, that's taken care of - with long horizontals its very possible to slide the wheel to a point where it won't index well.

-Ray