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Dorky Time Trial questions?(4 posts)

Dorky Time Trial questions?ZeGopha
Feb 18, 2003 10:26 AM
As a tri-athlete quite possibly having to take a break from running I have been kicking around the idea of doingg a couple of Time Trials. (As I already have a bike for that.)
Before I would try that, though, I got a coupel of questions so I don't show up looking like a dork.
1. To be competetive, how fast should you be going. In a tri I adverage in the 22, close to 23 range while saving some for the run. I definetly plan on being faster this year.
2. Any special rules. (aside from no drafting, or blocking.)
3. any comments?
Go fast, finish with nothing. Save some for the way back! nmSpunout
Feb 18, 2003 10:50 AM
re: Dorky Time Trial questions?DougSloan
Feb 18, 2003 11:45 AM
In still air on flat ground for a 10 mile Cat 4/5 race, I'd say close to 25 mph will be needed to be in the running. Wind and hills could vary that drastically, though.

Of course no drafting.

The primary idea is to ration your effort over the whole race. I typically do this by heart rate. I have a monitor with upper and lower alarms, and set them just above and below my ideal race pace. It takes a while to dial this in.

The main difference from Tri's, as noted above, is that you should collapse into a pile of crud at the finish. You don't leave anthing. When you get to the 1 k mark, don't sprint, but calculate your effort to use everything you have left over that distance. "Sprinting" at the end may amount to 22 mph, if that is all you have left.

Don't be overly concerned about your "minute men", unless you know them well. Pacing off them could be bad if they don't know what they are doing. However, if you know who the 2 minute back guy is, and he passes you a mile from the finish, you're in trouble. Nonetheless, ride your own race. If you have energy to keep up with the guy who passed you, you probably did not go fast enough earlier.

Doing it right is pure gut wrenching hell. I know, I did the equivalent of about 15 timetrials totalling about 125 miles, 45 minutes apart last fall in the Furnace Creek 508 team relay, leapfrogging teammates over the course, each time going all out. Great workout, though.

Doug
re: Dorky Time Trial questions?brider
Feb 18, 2003 2:27 PM
1. To be competetive, how fast should you be going. In a tri I adverage in the 22, close to 23 range while saving some for the run. I definetly plan on being faster this year.

As stated already, 25 mph will get you in the running in the 4/5s.

2. Any special rules. (aside from no drafting, or blocking.)

That's about it. Need a jersey (or skinsuit) with sleeves.

3. any comments?

Turn arounds -- practice them. And standing starts.