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NEW TO THE ROAD BIKING SCENE NEED HELP!!!(4 posts)

NEW TO THE ROAD BIKING SCENE NEED HELP!!!pwcracr
Feb 9, 2003 5:51 PM
All, I'm new to the Road biking scene and need a bit of help. I'm looking for a entry level bike that I could update as I go along......I have found a bike in teh local performance shop, it is a left over 2001 performance brand R201 with alum frame, clipless pedals and full sora triple drivetrain. seems like a really good deal for the price, 50% off of retail and might beable to talk them down a bit. any advice concerns would be great!! one final note I'm a die hard mtn biker and just looking to branch off into another form of riding
re: NEW TO THE ROAD BIKING SCENE NEED HELP!!!jtolleson
Feb 9, 2003 5:55 PM
The R201 is a perfectly functional entry level road bike. If it fits (and get them to help you with that if you aren't sure), 50% off retail is very competitive with the used bike market. Performance bike shops usually promise free service for a while, so ask about that.

50% off retail should be about $300. What are they quoting you for the bike?
re: NEW TO THE ROAD BIKING SCENE NEED HELP!!!pwcracr
Feb 10, 2003 7:21 PM
The bike retails for $699.00 I got out the door for $350.00. And the sales person put me on the bike and did some adjusting etc......said the geometry looked good!! I took it for a test ride and it felt comfortable to me....I know that the frame fit is the most important part and all the bells and whistles come later IE upgrades on componets etc......thanks for the help!!!!
Fit, Fit, Fit....kushogun
Feb 9, 2003 9:53 PM
The first thing you should think about, especially as an entry-level road cyclist is fit. You could have the smoothest rolling De Rosa King, a beautiful Colnago C-40, or a Fondriest Top Level Carbon frame, but if the top tube is a cm or two too long/short, that can lead to inefficient pedaling positions as well as sore joints. Make sure you take time and talk with the salesperson about the fit. Not necessarily do a custom fitting, but make sure that the top tube and stand-over height are appropriate for you. Now adays there is so much adjustablitly with adjustable setback seatposts, and a wide variety of stem lengths, rises, handlebar widths, crank lengths, even q-factors on pedals, that it shouldn't be too hard to dial in your perfect size with a little time. But just make sure that they get you on a bike that's in the ballpark size wise. After that, it's a matter on how much money you want to blow on bells and wistles, frame material, wheelsets, etc... But focus more on fit at this point.