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A silly question(5 posts)

A silly questionfixedgearnut
Feb 9, 2003 7:20 AM
I'm in the process of building a road bike using Campy Nuovo Record components (circa 1971). I have several frames I could use-I have a rear wheel that had an 8 speed cassette. Now, for the silly question- will the Campr rear der work in a friction mode with an 8 speed cassette? TIA, I'm sorry if this is a dumb question, but from my handle, you can see I don't have much experience with this shifting thing.
re: A silly questiondesmo
Feb 9, 2003 8:43 AM
I doubt it. A narrow 6-speed would probably be it's limit. Just go with 120 spacing and a 5 speed, if you're coming off a fixie that's already too many gears for you!
Well, this answer is completely wrongKerry Irons
Feb 9, 2003 8:27 PM
Campy NR was introduced in 1972, and was "old 6 speed" capable. This means 125 mm spacing, and even then you had some travel left at both ends of the spectrum. Whether it would work for 8 speed friction mode is doubtful but possible. You may just have to experiment.
You should be able to make it work.OldEdScott
Feb 10, 2003 9:58 AM
I've done similar, although with Suntour Cyclone instead of Campy NR. Just let out the limit screws. I believe you can get enough travel. Cyclone did it without blinking.
re: friction shiftingFredrico
Feb 12, 2003 2:51 PM
Well, I still go with friction shifting. The nice wide spacing of 6 speed cogs makes it easy. 7 speeds get a little touchy, hard to center the chain on the cogs. 8 speeds would be even touchier. It would seem you'd never know when you're in the gear. You'd have a hard time feeling the shift. The Nuovo Record derailleur pulley cage doesn't have enough clearance to shift the chain onto a cog larger than 24 tooth, and the in-out travel might not be enough to cover the 8 cog spread.

Try it. If worse came to worst, you could always use a different derailleur.