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Painting Titanium(11 posts)

Painting Titaniumlaffeaux
Feb 5, 2003 4:04 PM
I just spend an hour on Lemond's website playing with their bike customizing application. It lets you pick a frame and then pick the base color, panel color, logo color, etc. It's pretty cool.

Anyway, I was experimenting with the TI frame and really liked some of the painted options. However isn't one of the selling points of TI is that it looks good unpainted? I wasn't sure if I prefered the brushed TI, or a painted scheme (in particular teh "retro". What's others opinions on painted TI?

Note, this is purely for fun as I don't intend to buy a new bike.
re: Painting TitaniumThe Walrus
Feb 5, 2003 5:02 PM
I always thought titanium should look like titanium--painting sounded vaguely sacrilegious. At least I did until I saw the thread below about anodizing Ti frames. That blue/gold spatter job....Oh, my!
re: Painting Titaniumjtolleson
Feb 5, 2003 7:06 PM
Having spent a few seasons on an unpainted ti Litespeed Catalyst, I found myself longing for the pizzazz of paint and not wanting to stop riding ti... so I shopped Serotta and IF and Seven (all offer very nice paint options). Litespeed technically offers paint in some models but nothing really custom. And of course you can take any frame to a good custom painter before building it up.

I'm not sorry to have a painted ti bike. 'Cept that first scratch... ouch. No more buffing out scratches with a Scotch Brite pad...
My Dreamfractured
Feb 5, 2003 7:08 PM
My dream is a custom ti Spectrum, polished with a coat of translucent black and clearcoat, and the front done in super gloss pearl white, with a mix of blues and reds and yellow in flames or something where they join. also an alpha q carbon fork painted to match, with carbon showing on the bottem half.

outfit it with campy record all round, including carbon crank and seatpost, and some nucleon wheels and and cinelli RAM and fizik aliente. sexy.
have you seen polished Ti?cyclopathic
Feb 5, 2003 9:38 PM
looks like chromed CroMo
shinny is not for melaffeaux
Feb 5, 2003 11:50 PM
I like the look of brushed TI a lot, but could live without polished TI or AL. In fact I currently have two steel bikes that are dull gray, and have owned two others in the past. I guess I'm not into flashy colors.
does polished scratch easily? nmDougSloan
Feb 6, 2003 7:05 AM
doesn't seem tocyclopathic
Feb 6, 2003 7:19 AM
I have friends who ride polished Santana and frame doesn't seem to have any visible scars. It can be also polished so scratching doesn't seem to be an issue.

I should admit there's a plus road crude doesn't build up in polished as it does in brushed. Still for my eye polished Ti looks disgusting, just like chromed Huffy at Kmart.
depends...C-40
Feb 6, 2003 9:35 AM
Polished Litespeeds are primarily electropolished. This chemical process can produce an extremely brilliant surface that cannot be duplicated with any type of polishing compound.

I owned a polished Ultimate for a year and found it to be huge pain. It was very easy to scuff the frame. I spent a lot of time trying to keep the TT looking good. I worked for a couple of years in a plating shop and I'm well versed on buffing and polishing. I tired everything I could think of and none of the traditional ultrafine polishing compounds could duplicate the finish.

You can't handle a polished bike without getting fingerprints all over it. It's a lot more trouble than a nicely painted frame.
Looks vs. Ease of CleaningFez
Feb 6, 2003 6:58 AM
I think either painted or unpainted looks good.

With paint, you have to worry about scratches and chips.

Also, when cleaning the frame of dirt and grease, you don't have to be as careful with the bare Ti as you would with a painted frame.

Bare Ti is definitely a very functional finish.
re: Painted Ti by Joe BellRon L
Feb 6, 2003 11:21 AM
This is just one of a few really nice ti painted frames. Best frame and a good eye for color with a little polishing.