RoadBikeReview.com's Forum Archives - General


Archive Home >> General(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 )


At what price do you stop getting bang for your bike buck?(11 posts)

At what price do you stop getting bang for your bike buck?sprocket rocket
Dec 27, 2002 4:23 PM
My rig is Litespeed classic, dura ace, ksyrium ssc sl, easton ec70 fork, etc. I could upgrade some doo dads (my forgie stem and ritchey bio pro bar are not as high zoot as my other gear), but my rationale for higher zoot parts is getting pretty weak.

Another 300 bucks to shave off 80 grams? I shouldn't have ever gotten that hanging scale! After you spend four grand on your bike I start wondering why I am obsessed with getting my bike from 17.5 to 17.2 pounds.
5$ is too much if you don't ride...(nm)tempeteOntheRoad
Dec 27, 2002 4:38 PM
Let's rephrase the questionKerry
Dec 27, 2002 5:49 PM
At what point do you stop getting bang for your (car, hi-fi, boat, ski, motorcycle, tennis raquet, golf club, computer) buck? Do you get my point? Only you can determine whether you are satisfied with your current (very nice!) ride. Understand that none of the upgrades you contemplate will make you any faster or hold up better than your current stuff. Some people would claim that you should have bought an Airborne in the first place, and that the delta to your current bike wouldn't have made you any faster. Short answer: do it if you want to, but don't try to justify it on a performance basis.
the only rationale is...Bruno S
Dec 27, 2002 8:01 PM
that you want the best components out there. Weight or performance gain will be almost the same between those bars and stem and the best CNC machined stem and a carbon bar. You are almost there, if money is not an issue I say go for it.
Anything over $1/ gramDave Hickey
Dec 28, 2002 5:16 AM
Some guru said anything over $1/gram is a waste. I don't remember where I read it and I don't particularly believe it but if you want a number, it's a good as any.
Anything over $1/ gramgeeker
Dec 28, 2002 7:06 AM
That's my cutoff. But the OP's description of his ride ($4k bike) indicates that his $/g threshold is higher.
300 bucks to shave off 80 grams?bsdc
Dec 28, 2002 6:31 AM
I think most of us could shave 80 grams (less than 1/4 of a pound) of weight pretty quick and easy. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying don't buy the new stem and bar. I'd probably go out and do it myself. I just quit telling myself that my bike was the one that needed to lose the weight. I think of new doo dads like jewelry. It just makes her look pretty and feel good.
$1/gm is my basic rationalization, but after that...PdxMark
Dec 28, 2002 11:14 AM
I fall back on other rationalizations if there's something I think I want. "Bang for the buck" shifted from a performance issue to a rationalization issue for many of us long ago. If the change makes your bike feel/fit better for you, that might be all you need. We can spend almost anything on our bikes and still be way ahead of those who use motorized machines for their outdoor fun.
The cut off is whatever my sponsor sends me.BigLeadOutGuy
Dec 28, 2002 6:20 PM
Whatever they send to my doorstep is what I use. But I would rather have something thats 80 grams heavier but able to make it to the finish line. Unless your dealing with pounds its not that big a deal.
I heard this saying and I think its it probably the best cut off.
ALWAYS RIDE BETTER THAN YOUR EQUIPMENT
take the 300 bucks and sign up for a coach...you'll get a lot more out of the 300 bucks and you may end up smoking some of your buddies in the sprint.
Emotion, desire and lustj-son
Dec 28, 2002 7:11 PM
It's your call, based on your criteria, your wants, and your needs. If you desire lighter bar/stem, and can afford the $$, and are willing to make the purchase, than the equation seems to point towards a purchase.

I used to be borderline obsessive. I had a burning desire, a physical hunger, for the newest and lightest and Bestest. I had great parts but never road any faster. And, in retrospect, the great parts did not lead to more enjoyment, either.

Now, I ride a nice steel bike that is light enough, with excellent parts (full DA, but nothing goofy light or expensive), and great reliability.
It's your hobby, buy what you want...at least it's not drugs(nm)James
Dec 29, 2002 12:56 PM