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trainer damage??(5 posts)

trainer damage??mealex
Nov 23, 2002 2:29 PM
I've seen, in a few classified ads, "...never been used in a trainer....", as if it's a plus when buying a used bike.

Is there something about the use of a bike in a trainer that in some way harms the bike?

I know it's dreadfully boring, but I didn't think it was harmful to my bike.
Common worry; not sure it's justifiedretro
Nov 24, 2002 4:36 PM
You hear a lot about possible damage from trainers, but I've never talked to anybody who's actually seen it. I use a beater rather than one of my "good" bikes in the trainer, but I've had the same frame in there for five or six years (I also use it as a commuter in summer), and it's never showed any sign of trouble.
thanks, retromealex
Nov 24, 2002 5:04 PM
Two kinds of damageKerry
Nov 24, 2002 5:19 PM
One would be all the sweat that some people dribble on their frames if they are not using big enough fans and a cool enough space while on the trainer. The second is often referred to and some people would claim first hand experience - certain clamping systems can put a fair amount of stress on the frame in ways the frame was not designed to deal with. I believe this problem is assigned to some of the older BB clamp systems, which are largely off the market now. Rollers (shameless plug) do not have this problem.
I think it is harmfulLC
Nov 25, 2002 4:44 PM
When I clamp across the rear wheel I notice alot more flex in the bottem bracket area then I do on the road. On the road the rear triangle would not be restrained like that. While a steel frame (especially an old heavy one) can probally take it, I have a feeling a aluminum frame could be damaged faster. Titanium is also probally ok because like steel it has good durability with stresses below its elastic limit, but carbon fiber would depend on how it was built. Still, there is no way to really prove it.