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Aero verses light weight wheels for climbing.(11 posts)

Aero verses light weight wheels for climbing.Juanmoretime
Nov 20, 2002 5:43 AM
Are aero or light weight wheels more suitable for different climbing scenerios? Would a light weight or aero wheel be more suitable for a very hilly course with short, steep climbs and descents? How about which of the two would be the better choice for extended continuious climbing and descending?

Thanks.
I bet thatEager Beagle
Nov 20, 2002 5:56 AM
unless the aeros would stop a ship, it would make no discernable real world difference.

You could argue you should play to your strengths, or compensate for your weakensses with the wheels.

I think about the only sensible thing to say is that as most drag comes from the spokes not the rim anyway, you may be better off with the lightweights for the climb. I can certainly notice no diffrence between my Ks and Comsmic Elites in terms of downhill speed, so you may as well save a bit of energy pushing weight up the hill.
K's are not aeroniteschaos
Nov 20, 2002 7:14 AM
It depends on the kind of climbing. I believe strongly in analyticalcyling.com, so there. But my person experience has been that for long prolonged climbs where your average speed of accent is going to be less than 15mph, go with whatever is lightest and you can afford. If money is no object get Zip303s or Zip404s and enjoy the best of both worlds.

As far as decents go I am 200 pounds to I would be a brick to the bottom dropped from the same height anyways. (remember that only 15% of total drag from air comes from the machine, the rest is based on rider. You want to be trully aero, get clip-ons, if not allowed, then don't fret it.)
K's are not aero?trekkie1
Nov 20, 2002 7:26 AM
Got any testing to back that up?
John Cobb does.TrekFurthur
Nov 20, 2002 7:46 AM
Do a google search for John Cobb and his website--he has data (a bit dated) on a number of wheels; Hed 3 was the most aero.
The bladed spokes are the only true aero parts. -nmTig
Nov 20, 2002 11:39 AM
No, but the Elites are. (nm)Eager Beagle
Nov 20, 2002 8:16 AM
Aero and lightJS
Nov 20, 2002 7:31 AM
My 404's are 1335 grams, with Tufo tubulars they are about a POUND, lighter than the lightest Ksyrium SL wheel tire combo you can put together.
Or for about half the moneypmf1
Nov 20, 2002 7:52 AM
and 100 grams extra, you can get something like Speeddream Aerolights. Mine weigh 1435 grams/set with the skewers. Basically, American Classic hubs, Sapim spokes, Venus rims (or you could do Open Pro). Dave builds them for $520, or you could have someone else make a similar set of wheels.

For serious climbing, light wheels are the way go. Aero makes little difference when climbing or descending (unless you go down hills with no turns).

Zipps are the sh!t though. Always wanted a pair, but could never justify the expense. Aero for flats, lightness for hills.

K's are not a super light or super aero wheel. They're a decent combination of both. The appeal of K's for me is their toughness. They are a very bulletproof wheel.
infotrekkie1
Nov 20, 2002 6:49 AM
http://www.analyticcycling.com/WheelsConcept_Page.html

http://www.ultracycling.com/equipment/wheels.html

Aero almost always wins.
Both..DINOSAUR
Nov 20, 2002 7:46 AM
The light weight wheels will help a tab when climbing and the aerodynamic wheels will make a difference when descending...that's the diff I've found bouncing back and forth between 2 bikes...but not by much...you want strong wheels when you hit the descents as most mountain roads are lousy....you can make your bike aerodynamic by stretching out you position and going to a longer stem...if you can do that...all from a layman's point of view....