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Long Distance Training Q?(7 posts)

Long Distance Training Q?timfire
Nov 18, 2002 12:58 PM
I am considering doing a 2-day, 300 mile tour in March (not that you can't do the math, but that's two 150 mile days). This is not an organized tour, I would just be doing it with a couple of friends.

Earlier this summer I rode at least 5 days a week and routinely went out for 50-60 mile rides. I also did a couple of centuries. So I'm not afraid of doing these distances. But the last couple of months I have mostly done short rides (under 10 miles), and I feel a bit out-of-practice you could say for longer rides. So I thought I should start back at like 40 miles for my training rides and work my way up.

So here's my question: As I plan out my miles for the months to come, if I increase my miles by 10-12% each week, in the beginning those increases will only be like 4 or 5 miles a week (15-20 minutes), and then later will be like 10-13 miles (45-60 minutes). In the beginning that seems low, especially since I know I've done those distances before. Then later the increases seem really big.

So what do you all think? Also any tips for longer rides would be appreciated.

--Tim Kleinert
complete infotrekkie1
Nov 18, 2002 1:03 PM
http://www.ultracycling.com/training/training.html
make one ride a week 10% longer every other week. nmdzrider
Nov 18, 2002 1:57 PM
You left out your weekly mileageKerry
Nov 18, 2002 4:49 PM
70 miles a week is not great preparation for a 300 mile weekend, but it's HUGELY better than 30 miles per week. If you were in top shape and have been riding 10 miles a day to keep your form, it's a totally different situation than if you were in so-so shape and have ridden 2-3 times per week since then. If the former, you can probably jump your mileage pretty rapidly in preparation for the March ride. If the latter, you need to be building base and looking for opportunities to do rides of about 75 miles on occasion. If you can do 75 miles without problems, then 150 is doable if you pace yourself, hydrate well, and eat well.
A lot of things can happen between now and March.MB1
Nov 19, 2002 6:40 AM
There is sure to be some nasty weather to mess up your training. I'd suggest that you try for 3 weeks of increased mileage if you can then a 50% cutback on the 4th week for recovery-then repeat the whole sequence. If you have a bad weather week make that your recovery week and start the sequence from there.

One thing is for sure, you have lots of time before March so an off week or 2 won't hurt you.

The more you train before the ride the less it will hurt then. I also think that a 10% mileage increase per week is not enough at the beginning and too much towards the end. Why don't you start with a 100 mile week and see how you recover-then build from there.
Another alternative.Len J
Nov 19, 2002 6:48 AM
Don't train based on miles, train based on time.

If you can comfortably do 1.5 hours now increase it by 15 to 30 minutes per ride per week until you are at or around how long you think the target ride will require. This way you are building up slowly.

Len
Thanks everyone.timfire
Nov 19, 2002 6:24 PM
Thanks everyone.

For more info, over the summer I was in pretty good shape, doing probably around 200 miles a week. But then school started back up and I no longer had the time to do that much. Now it's three months and probably only 500 miles later. A while ago I did a 30 mile ride and felt pretty tired afterward.

My idea was to increase my miles by like 12% each week for 4 weeks, and then backtrack a week and start over. That way I would really only increase my miles by like 25% each month.

I considered doing the training by time-thing. It might actually be easier considering that right now I don't have a computer on my bike.

Right now I'm thinking I might stage my training so in the beginnning the percentage-gains are greater in the beginning and less in the end.

Thanks again!

--Tim Kleinert