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Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???(51 posts)

Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???spyderman
Sep 28, 2002 11:02 PM
I really enjoy my Trek. I'm proud that it's made in the U.S.A.. Are Italian bikes better? If so, why?
Are you sure it's made in the USA? (nm)phlegm
Sep 28, 2002 11:05 PM
nm
Please... nmspyderman
Sep 29, 2002 2:39 AM
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???The Human G-Nome
Sep 28, 2002 11:24 PM
if you're riding a high-end bike, the differences are negligible and come down to personal preference and style. the italian bikes have more IMO. it's kind of like saying, i drive a corvette.... what's so great about a Ferrari. well, they're just different animals. there's lots of great american art, but that doesn't mean my favorite artist has to be from this continent.
Exactly-MXL02
Sep 29, 2002 3:50 AM
It is a pure style issue...I have a friend who trading in his his Trek 5500 for a C-40/Campy Record...will it make it him faster? Doubtful, but he wants it for the style...pure Italiano, OOF with yellow seat and handlebar tape...a modern classic.
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???Rusty Coggs
Sep 29, 2002 5:07 AM
If you have to ask,you will never understand.
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???Dog
Sep 29, 2002 5:21 AM
Another reason is that here in italy, you don't need to spend a fortune for a nice bike. The fact is in the States, the more it costs the better it must be ehh? Not so, pick up an off name frame, custom fit and paint for 500 bucks.
because they're ItalianDanoK
Sep 29, 2002 6:51 AM
I know that sounds like a smartass answer, but I think that the reason so many people like their Italian bikes is simply because they've always wanted an Italian bike and when they get one, they ascribe to it all kinds of esoteric qualities, whether they deserve them or not.

Having said that, I have a 1994 Pinarello Gavia with Campy Chorus 8-speed Ergopower that I still love to ride. I bought it from Giovanni Pinarello at his shop in Treviso, Italy when I arrived in Aviano in 1994. Proceeded to spend the next 4 years riding that thing all over the Dolomite mountains of northeastern Italy (where Aviano Airbase is). I estimate that I have about 30,000 miles on it and it still rides and looks great. The only reason I don't have more miles on it is that I also have other road bikes that I like. Is my Pinarello better than my Serotta Atlanta? Well, probably not...its heavier and not quite as stable on descents as the Serotta. But part of the reason I like the Pinarello so much is the circumstances of how I bought it (Giovanni Pinarello even bought me a cup of espresso in the cafe behind his shop the day I picked it up) and the memories of riding it all over northern Italy. Those things make the bike very special for me. That's not to say that I'm letting sentimentality cloud my judgment...because it is a fantastic bike. Even with 3 other road bikes and the Pinarello being the heaviest and the oldest of the bunch, I still ride it more than any of the others. I will hopefully never part with it.
This whole issue is all about the romanticized idealLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 7:48 AM
of having an Italian frame and components. Like others have said here, it is about the "idea" of riding one that is the appeal and less about the actual form and function. I have ridden Scapin, Fondriest, Bottechia which were all fine bikes, but bottom line, they are not better than any well made bike made in any other country.
In fact, the Bottechia fell victim to the "nice paint job" scheme rather than being a great bike. The Scapin broke at the bottom bracket in a sprint. The car analogy and the idea of owning a Ferrari, Maserati and Alfa seems great until you get the repair bills. All nice cars, but not the most mechanically sound. My girlfriends dad owned several of these cars and they were just horrible mechanically, but the ooooohhhh and aaaahhhhh factor was always there but got old once they were overheating on the Tappan Zee bridge every time they hit traffic.
There are many purists out there that swear there is something special about riding an Italian frame. Sorry to break it to you, it is purely a psychological phenomenon as they are not "better" than my Litespeeds. I posted a picture of my Classic and Vortex here long before the arguments and my Fondriest got the drools while the Litespeeds which are much better IMO got the jeers. Most were the purist morons that feel a bike isn't worth riding if it has some Italian heritage. I am Italian-American from a very Italian neighborhood in Brooklyn NY so you would think I would have a hard on for all that is guinea but I don't. I rode Campy which wasn't nearly as smooth and trouble free as my Dura Ace but that is another ridiculous argument.
Bottom line is that whatever is rare gets the drools because they are "unique". There was once a time when Litespeed was coveted and had an air of mystique 7 plus years ago. Now of course they are "garbage" and "played out and overpriced". I think that is funny when Pinarello sells an Aluminum frame at similar prices which is a far cheaper material and Colnagos warranties are dismal. Go figure, but people don't seem to care. Ride what you want it is only a bike.
that's as good a reason as any.DaveG
Sep 29, 2002 12:39 PM
The mystique/romance/heritage of Italian bikes is what makes them interesting. Let's face it, lot's of folks here buy stuff they don't really "need" but feel compelled to do so for the love of the machine. Some folks trick out with all the latest gee-whiz lightweight gear, others drool over lugs and craftmanship. I have two Italian bikes (with Campy, of course). I would never argue that these better are better from a performance perspective, but they do provide a certain level of enjoyment that I don't think I could get from a Trek/'Dale/Specialized/etc
Now that defines "soul."Spoiler
Sep 29, 2002 6:39 PM
"But part of the reason I like the Pinarello so much is the circumstances of how I bought it (Giovanni Pinarello even bought me a cup of espresso in the cafe behind his shop the day I picked it up) and the memories of riding it all over northern Italy. Those things make the bike very special for me"
I couldn't find the words to explain it, so thanks for doing it for me.
Ut oh, he's getting curious.Spoiler
Sep 29, 2002 7:34 AM
A nice bike is a nice bike. A bike is a nice way to express some individualty. That's hard to do with a Trek when they're so common place. Now they're coming out with these goofy flame paint jobs. Wondering how the other half lives? It is tempting isn't it? Ever wonder you never see guys with Italian bikes asking this question about US bikes?
Probably because they're completely satisified with their bike. There's no way to prove a bike has "soul", and you'll never hear a Trek owner claiming his bike has it. But they'll never have the same smile that the guys with Italian bikes seem to have.
Spoiler, that is the most ridiculous thing I haveLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 9:12 AM
ever heard and totally subjective. You apparently fall prey to the whole romanticized Italian purity bullsh$%. My Litespeeds satisfy me to no end when they safely get me down a 55+ MPH descent.
And your statement that Italian bike riders don't lust after American bikes is misinformed because Litespeeds, Sevens and Serottas are lusted after in Europe as they are so rare over there. Like I said you are confusing popularity with a lack of "soul" or "quality". I use the analogy of adolescent thinking patterns of when you hear a song that you love and the lyrics hit home to you and all you can do is turn your friends onto it initailly. But as soon as it gets played on top 10 radio, that same song that meant so much because played out and old. Why? Same song and same meaning but the fact that others are enjoying it, cheapens it for you.
That goofy Trek has been ridden to 4 consecutive TDFs. Can't be that bad.
P.S. I have a Fondriest in my collection and it has no soul, just components, oil and wheels. The least ridden bike I have. It is a bike with a very nice paint job. My Litespeeds are bare, but their function and form are so obvious. No paint to hide any imperfections.
Spoiler, that is the most ridiculous thing I havedivve
Sep 29, 2002 9:16 AM
Don't forget we also love Cannondale in Europe:)
That is right, C'dales are also lusted after in Europe. NMLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 9:32 AM
ClaificationSpoiler
Sep 29, 2002 12:59 PM
I started my post out by stating that a nice bike is a nice bike. I though that was self-explanatory.
A quality bike is a quality bike, no matter whether it's made in Italy or the US.
I followed this by giving some possible reasons why people who own Italian bikes LOVE their bike. Yes, love is subjective. So is soul. Maybe if someone else had your Fondriest, they would see soul in it.
Lances TDF victories have nothing to do with which bike he rides. If Colnogo sponsored USPS, would you still have a point?
The primary reason for painting bikes has nothing to do with hiding imperfections in the build. Bare steel tends to rust. People like paint. Humans react favorably to colors. Ever notice now cars tend to come with paint on them?
Ti bikes don't need paint to prevent rust. I doubt that Ti owners love the bland color of Ti. They just like to leave it bare so other people will be sure to know that they have a Ti bike. It has nothing to do with the manufacturer. Losts of Italian Ti bikes are unpainted.
LOL, first off bare ti is a preference of many.Lazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 1:43 PM
Stainless steel refrigerators are amongst the best in the world (Subzero) and lack color which is why people want them. So your statement that people who own Ti would rather have a painted frame is silly. I actually prefer the industrial look of my ti frames to a guady paint job.
Yes, Lance could win on any bike, but my point was that he did win on a Trek showing the Trek's capabilites despite a lot of disparaging remarks about them made by so many people around here. And obviously, paint serves a purpose to protect the metal but gaudy paint shcemes are part of the draw of the Italian frame. If Colnagos painted all their bikes solid silver would they still have the same appeal? I say emphatically, no.
The point about the "soul" of a bike comes from the machine's function. Any bike that gets you home safely and reliably year in year out and does it with an understated or no paint job shows me more than a bike that says "look at me I am sooooo attention seeking".
Ti is actually harder to paint which is why most are bare btw. And your analogy about people liking color and cars have paint is also silly because the most popular car color in the past 5-7 years has been silver which is not very colorful and looks a lot like my ti frames. Every major car company has sold more silver cars than any other color and this trend has lasted longer than I expected. Rethink your posts. LMAO
Gigga please!The Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 2:10 PM
not only is your argument flawed, but you seem "angry" that the people on this board "don't get it". people dissing the treks are only dissing the style. no one is arguing that it isn't an awesome ride. no one is describing any shortcomings. style is subjective, of course, so what is your beef? i suppose you shop at the GAP as well? TREK = GAP. some people prefer items of "art" which AREN'T mass produced. why is that so difficult for you to understand. it has nothing at all to do with adolescence. if you choose to ride a TREK, no one gives a damn. they will look the other way knowing that you have a terrific ride. are they going to lust after your bike? of course not. and since that isn't your aim, then you're just fine aren't you. bicycles ARE art. take a look at a Landshark or a DeRosa and try to convince me that isn't true. just because you don't appreciate them doesn't mean others shouldn't be able to. did you ever collect baseball cards or comic books as a kid? oil paintings as an adult? fine wines? some of these items are WORTH more simple because they display a craftmanship not often seen and are more rare. if you don't like it, WHO CARES. go buy some cheap wine. go buy some crappy Kincaid paintings. no one cares what you do with your money.
lol @ Trek=Gapfbg111
Sep 29, 2002 2:32 PM
C'mon, Gap?? That's hitting below the belt. How about Trek = Eddie Bauer, LL Bean, or Banana Republic instead? lol. Gap is all about overpriced form over function. At least the others offer some function as well.
lol @ Trek=GapThe Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 2:35 PM
point well taken. trek = Eddie Bauer. GAP shouldn't enter the equation.
The Human GonadLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 2:50 PM
You really are a fu(king idiot. I like Bill's Kakhis (best in the world), but my Gap Chinos look and feel the same. I collect wrist watches and know the difference between quality and shi$%, but I can appreciate my Rolex and Omegas as much as my Swiss Army. You are all fluff and no substance, that is why you need to ride a loud obnoxious bike because you lack personality yourself.
Read what FBG said, it makes more sense than your rhetoric. You are a moron. Please, no one reprimand me for my attacks it doesn't influence me in the least. You all should know that by now.
ahhhh...I can hear you Rolex pumping @28,800 bpm right now :) nmdivve
Sep 29, 2002 3:31 PM
The Human GonadThe Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 4:11 PM
usually, you can tell when your debating someone who's reasonable. that's because they don't begin their tantrums with "you are a f'king idiot". resorting to name calling makes you look like a real "adolescent" (your words) genius. it's funny though, because i must have hit a nerve with the "GAP" crack as it turns out you wear GAP (LOL). i own no rolex. i do, however, own a Swiss Army which suits me just fine. it's funny that you can make a comment like "you lack personality yourself" based on my preference for italian bikes. (see: unreasonable tantrum above). this defensive diatribe makes you sound even more unreasonable then you sounded in previous posts. the funniest thing is, never once did i say that TREK was a bad bike. in fact, i praised it. and yet still, just because i don't want to own one and fall in line with your perfect idea of the universe, i'm a "Gonad". (again, brilliant comeback).

p.s. go see a shrink. i wasn't attacking you and you had no business attacking me. enjoy your genuine, one-of-a-kind Thomas Kincade!
Welcome to the world of arguing withjtolleson
Sep 29, 2002 4:21 PM
our resident ad hominem expert. He can't keep his temper in checking and invariably calls all detractors something like f-ing idiot. Classic. I don't even bother partaking anymore.
Welcome to the world of arguing withThe Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 4:26 PM
i dunno, he should be congratulated. he's my first enemy on this messageboard and you never forget your first. it would help though, if he came at me with little more substance and a few less expletives. (but thanks for the heads up!)
Gigga please!The Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 2:34 PM
not only is your argument flawed, but you seem "angry" that the people on this board "don't get it". people dissing the treks are only dissing the style. no one is arguing that it isn't an awesome ride. no one is describing any shortcomings. style is subjective, of course, so what is your beef? i suppose you shop at the GAP as well? TREK = GAP. some people prefer items of "art" which AREN'T mass produced. why is that so difficult for you to understand. it has nothing at all to do with adolescence. if you choose to ride a TREK, no one gives a damn. they will look the other way knowing that you have a terrific ride. are they going to lust after your bike? of course not. and since that isn't your aim, then you're just fine aren't you. bicycles ARE art. take a look at a Landshark or a DeRosa and try to convince me that isn't true. just because you don't appreciate them doesn't mean others shouldn't be able to. did you ever collect baseball cards or comic books as a kid? oil paintings as an adult? fine wines? some of these items are WORTH more simple because they display a craftmanship not often seen and are more rare. if you don't like it, WHO CARES. go buy some cheap wine. go buy some crappy Kincaid paintings. no one cares what you do with your money.
Lazywriter or Lazyreader?Spoiler
Sep 29, 2002 5:21 PM
I tried keep keep things simple for you, but I guess you still completely miss my point. I kind of doubt you'll ever get the point.
What the hell do refrigerators and teenage music have to do with the price of oranges in Alaska? Please try keep some resemblance of relevance.
There was never any "statement that people who own Ti would rather have a painted frame." I said the exact opposite.
Soul isn't about function. It's created in the owners head.
An owner can believe his bike has soul even if it doesn't function as well as it should.
I'd like to point out that you can get an unpainted Ti Colnago, Bianchi, or Pinarello, but you can't get any Trek in solid silver. They now have some gawdy flame job added. They must think that's what's popular.
I'd ask you to tell us where you got your car color "5-7 year" stats, but since it has nothing to do with Italian vs. American bikes, we can forget you brought it up.
Spoiler, you statedLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 7:03 PM
"I doubt that Ti owners love the bland color of Ti."
So I am not a Lazyreader like you implied and my analogy about stainless refrigerators is simple and relevant. Point being that some people prefer that look and you stated your doubts about ti owners liking the bland color of ti. You cannot even argue correctly. You are apparently not too bright are you?
As far as silver being the popular car color over the past 7 years, look around at car ads. Honda, VW, Lexus, and even the new Z commercials almost invariably show silver cars.
LMFAO
Spoiler, you statedSpoiler
Sep 29, 2002 8:08 PM
"The most popular car color in the past 5-7 years has been silver which is not very colorful and looks a lot like my ti frames. Every major car company has sold more silver cars than any other color and this trend has lasted longer than I expected.".
"As far as silver being the popular car color over the past 7 years, look around at car ads."

So you based your arguement on data collected from watching TV ads?
Does this mean that the most popular recreational activity for Lincoln Navigator owners is burning out the electronic motors on their optional do-dads, while listening to the jazz quartet jam in the apartment upstairs? Must be, I don' saw it on the TV!
I was kind of looking forward to you replying with some J.D. Powers survey that backed your statement up. But come on. You didn't even try to look up some real data. Show some effort, it might even pan out.

ps: I have admit that your gift for spreading the manure does show some Italian panache. :)
Fwiw, I love the "bland" color of unpainted Ti.fbg111
Sep 29, 2002 2:26 PM
To me, the material and workmanship of the bike is the soul of the bike, and bikes on which you can actually see that aspect are prettier and have more "soul" than painted ones. The paint job is functionally irrelevant, other than to protect from corrosion, and is someone else's idea of artistic/cool/pretty/whatever. Unadorned Ti is what it is, with no attempt at pretense or need for surface decoration. Imho, there's no bike more beautiful and exciting (looks-wise) than a finished Ti Litespeed, Merlin, or Serotta. Carbon bikes like the Giant TCR Composite are a close second, again with minimal paint covering the material. I have nothing against paint, especially as it is necessary to prevent corrosion on steel and aluminum. But if biking were a beauty contest and I were a judge, I'd vote for the unadorned Ti and composites every time.
FBG, very well said. NMLazywriter
Sep 29, 2002 2:46 PM
I love my American brand Ironhorse Victorytaar44
Sep 29, 2002 9:03 AM
even though it was probably 80% assembled in Taiwan :-)
Geometry and descendingirregardless
Sep 29, 2002 9:34 AM
Some Italian frames have a slack head tube angle (resulting in lots of trail) and a low bottom braket, most American frames don't. This makes a huge difference to me in stability during descents. I was shocked how at how well these bikes felt compared to their American counterparts. The only American frame that I have found that compares as far as geometry is concerned is Serotta.
exactly ... it's fit and ridebianchi boy
Sep 29, 2002 4:58 PM
I don't even bother looking at US made bikes because I know they won't fit me. Virtually all US frames are stretched out -- with top tubes longer than their seat tubes. That's fine if it fits you, but it doesn't work for me. Although you can buy "long" Italian bikes (Bianchi, Ciocc, Guerciotti), there are a number of Italian bikes that have the more traditional "square" geometry with top tubes about the same length or shorter than seat tubes (Colnago, Gios, Basso, Moser, Pinarello).

The whole style issue is a matter of taste. If you like the wild paint jobs of Colnagos, you can find similar looks in a Landshark and other US frames. As far as ti goes, the bare metal look is fine if that's what turns you on. Personally, I think bare ti bikes are boring, although I occasionally see one I like. Maybe if Litespeed did SOMETHING, ANYTHING to make their bikes visually appealing they would interest me, but I don't even like the color of their decals. I have no doubt they are fine bikes, but if I was considering one I would buy a Merckx Majestic which looks better than any Litespeed (to me), costs less and would fit me better (and yes, I realize they are made by Litespeed).
Good points.fbg111
Sep 29, 2002 5:42 PM
Just checked out the Majestic, very nice. I assume it would fit you better b/c the top tube is not as stretched out? Also, on this site it says "The [Majestic] tubing (and most importantly, the geometry) is nothing like you'll find on a Litespeed or a Merlin."

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/bike_merckx.htm

Are they referring only to the top tube:seat tube ratio, or are there other geometry differences?
Re: Good points.rdbkr
Sep 29, 2002 10:08 PM
The seat-tube angle is a little shallower, providing more saddle set-back for us long-femur types. Also, the chainstays are a little longer for a more comfortable and stable ride.

The site you posted has a geometry chart. You'll find the angles to be on the shallow side compared to LS or Merlin.
Thanx. nmfbg111
Sep 30, 2002 5:47 AM
merckx geometrytarwheel
Sep 30, 2002 7:45 AM
The classic Merckx century geometry frame (in my size anyway) has seat and top tubes the same length measured c-c (shorter top tubes in larger sizes), relaxed seat tube angles (72.5-73), relatively long chain stays. Supposedly this makes for a stable, comfortable ride for long distances. I say supposedly because although I've been trying to buy a Merckx frame for nearly a year, I can't seem to locate a used steel one in my size (56 cm). I've been looking for a Merckx because I am most comfortable on a frame with a short top tube and the Merckx in my size has one of the shortest effective top tubes when you take into account the seat tube angle. I may eventually break down and order a Majestic, despite my ambivalence about bare ti. If you could buy this frame painted, I would have ordered one already.
merckx geometryfbg111
Sep 30, 2002 8:58 AM
I see, thanks. I bought my first road bike, a TCR, a few months ago. It's good for short distance racing and training, but now I'm looking for another bike I can do centuries and distance stuff on, as well as racing. I like Ti and Carbon for that. I haven't ridden a bike with shorter top-tube geometry since my lbs only had American and Asian bikes. But I'll be sure to check out some Italian ones next time around to see if I like their positioning better. Sounds like it's a matter of whether I like to stretch out over the top, or squeeze into an egg. Will definitely test ride the Majestic whenever I get around to buying the next one.
Painted Majesticrdbkr
Sep 30, 2002 12:40 PM
My apologies if you know this already, but did you know that Colorado Cyclist offers a powdercoat finish for the Majestic? (I think they even have your size.)
exactly ... it's fit and rideirregardless
Sep 29, 2002 5:57 PM
Like you, the shorter top tube is the main reason I went Italian. I was surprised what a better fit it was for my shorter arms. But the kicker was how well these bikes handle and descend. I had no idea what I was missing. Best biking move I ever made.
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???flying
Sep 29, 2002 9:50 AM
I was always that way till recently.
I always rode Italian. Masi (italian version) & Colnago.
But now that I have bought a Look 380i I have found this is what suites me best.
Dont get me wrong I still think most Italian bikes are beautiful but for me this *French* bike is *Better* by far.
Italian Bikes...Geex
Sep 29, 2002 11:11 AM
I would suggest a slightly different angle towards the same point. Two of the rides in my garage are a 5900 and a Vamoots. Both are built here in the States (Wisconsin/Colorado). The 5900 is a third (maybe fourth, fifth?) generation Oclv that Trek has expended considerable resources refining over the years. They have tested it themselves, riders have returned the broken frames that Trek examines to further develop the design. For the last several years, the pro peloton has ridden them to some success (and broken some along the way). The frame components pop out of molds that are hand assembled in a very meticulous process that virtually eliminates any hint of craftsmanship. The Oclv's are fine frames.

The Vamoots is straight gauge Tig welded 3/2.5 titanium round tubing. The only tubing manipulations are the couple degrees of bends in the chain stays. The tubes are mitered and radius-cut for very close fitting joints and the welds are immaculate. The discussions regarding the appearance of welds versus structural integrity are well taken; in this context, that the welding is so clean is more an indication of commitment to craftsmanship and taking the time and effort to assemble so closely to fine tolerances. This frame was put together by experienced craftsmen who take considerable pride in their work and the resulting frame that I am, in turn, quite proud to ride. The Moots frames are also very fine frames and for very different reasons than the Oclv's.

The point is that the Italian bike builders (generally) consider themselves artisans and it shows on much of the equipment that they produce. They have cultivated decades of experience to build beautiful and well tuned frames. There are also frame builders outside of Italy who build with equivalent emotional commitment and dedication whose bikes show it. When we throw a leg over a machine with such a legacy, Italian or otherwise, those of us who appreciate a good ride can't help but feel inspired.

My other current inspirations relevant to this subject: LS Vortex/D-A and Fondriest P4/Record, both also wonderful rides.
Your age might be relevantWalter
Sep 29, 2002 11:24 AM
For the older riders out here (35+) we might be influenced still by memories from when we got started in the sport/hobby/avocation/obsession/etc. Back then, when $1K bought all the bike that could be bought, that bike came from Europe and probably Italy with some going for Raleigh Pros or Internationals and a few oddballs like myself falling hard for Motobecane. There were other offerings with their fans as well. However, even the Schwinn Paramount (about the only US offering) rider would stop to look at a Masi or Cinelli. They were "as good as it got" and if eBay is any indicator are still lusted after. I have often thought of fitting an old Masi with new gear, Campy of course, and satisfying both my love for retro and tech. in one swoop.

Anyways for many the Italcyclophilism (my word and I'm proud of it!) is truly engrained and not to disappear though American bikes are truly superb.
A prophet has no honor in his home countryLeroy
Sep 29, 2002 12:58 PM
The real expert is the one from out of town. etc. etc. It's human nature to ascribe extra intangible magical qualities to something from somewhere else. Euros lust after Treks and Cannondales. Airbornes sell like crazy in the UK to hear Airborne tell it.

Combine that with the practice of contempt prior to investigation, and with the tendency to offer opinions on subjects with no experience, and you have the makings of a long discussion thread!

My favorite bike right now is a cannondale caad5. Great bike, no querstion; handmade right here in the USA - like spyderman's trek.

I have read for as long as I've lurked on this forum that if I got this bike all my fillings would vibrate out. Not! The caad5 rides as smooth as my italian steel bike and is livelier. I say this to point out that there's no telling how many of these vibration opinions had no basis in experience.

A good bike is one that's good for you and that you want to ride. I say potayto, you say potatto - can I get a witness, Dan Quayle!! All generalizations are bullshit, including this one. Let's hear it for amendment #1.

Dave Loving
That explains France's thing for Jerry Lewis (nm)irregardless
Sep 29, 2002 5:52 PM
That explains France's thing for Jerry Lewis (nm)irregardless
Sep 29, 2002 5:57 PM
Awesome post man!!! ROTFLMAO nmspyderman
Sep 29, 2002 11:12 PM
A prophet has no honor in his home countryDog
Sep 30, 2002 3:43 AM
I can tell you from experience that nobody "lusts" after Canondales here in N. Italy. I've lived her for over a year and there are litteraly hundreds of cyclists rolling thru here everyday. I rarely see anything but local hi-end bikes. That's not to say the CAAD 5 isn't a great frame because they are, but who wants to spend 2500 Euro for a CAAD 5 with 105 and Ultegra mix when you can get something much nicer built locally.
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???The Human G-Nome
Sep 29, 2002 2:36 PM
p.s. I see the ghost of a better world living in your disbelief in ghosts.
re: Why do so many people love their Italian-made bikes???aliensporebomb
Sep 30, 2002 9:48 AM
I think part of it is the scarcity and nod to old world
hand-craftsmanship - the idea of the bike being labored
over by an artisan who learned the craft from his father
and his father before him - that the bike is a piece of
functional art and it is carrying on a special and unique
legacy instead of being stamped out of a mold somewhere.

That being said, I know I did a doubletake when I saw my
first Colnago C-40 out on the road - in Minnesota you don't
see bikes like that too often. The ubiquitous Schwinn and
Trek you see everywhere. A local tuesday night roadie ride
there were tons of OCLV's and Lance-bikes - they're very
cool and if someone said "here kid, take one" I wouldn't
turn it down.

But there's something about the scarcity and uniqueness of
the foreign brands. In Minnesota for every 20 Treks you
might see one Colnago or Pinarello.

I know my TCR isn't as unique as some of those foreign
brands but love it just the same. 40 mile jaunts are
seem like they take half the exertion.

Face it - some of us BOND with our bikes in a very odd
and unusual way. Who's to say what's more soulful - the
plebian Huffy or the high-end carbon fiber monster bikes?
Get what you like and ride it until it falls apart.

Then ride some more.