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Carbon seatpost upgrade?(9 posts)

Carbon seatpost upgrade?PEDDLEFOOT
Sep 23, 2002 6:52 AM
I currently have an aluminum seatpost.I ride an aluminum Trek frame.The ride on long distances (70miles or more) can sometimes be a little rough.Would upgrading my seatpost to carbon have a noticable effect on ride quality?
Probably notFez
Sep 23, 2002 7:08 AM
but upgrading your frame would.

Carbon seatposts seem to be one of those nice finishing touches to an exotic or custom bicycle. Saves a few grams compared to other seatpost materials, but not a good bang per buck upgrade. If there is a ride difference, I doubt its very noticeable, based on the Carbon posts I have ridden on. You could probably get more of a difference by changing saddles for the kind of money you would throw on a carbon post.

BTW I like the Thomson Elite aluminum post just because its a really good design.
I recommend quality Shorts instead of a new seatpostMaartin
Sep 23, 2002 7:27 AM
I replaced my Icon with USE carbon post (needed a longer seatpost so I went Carbon) on my carbon Trek 5200 and could not notice diffrence. Top racing quality shorts (Nalini, Assos etc)though really made a big improvement. I am spoiled now.
nopmf1
Sep 23, 2002 7:49 AM
I've had aluminium and carbon seatposts on the same bikes and cannot tell a bit of difference.
noJohnSmith
Sep 23, 2002 8:23 AM
Bigger tires would. Try 25 or 28mm tires with supple casing. This will make the biggest difference to ride feel.
re: Carbon seatpost upgrade?MrCrud
Sep 23, 2002 8:52 AM
I've noticed a big improvement when using either a Ti or carbon seatpost. It doesnt do anything for pressure points, but smooths a lot of the vibration that comes through. BTW, i ride a steel bike, which is already smoother than an aluminium. Dont go nuts on a carbon seatpost, but i know there are a few relatively cheap ones out there that provide more comfort. I've seen a few very nice ones that went for about 45$ USD.

Cheers!

Mr.Crud
I can save you some money.Eager Beagle
Sep 23, 2002 10:25 AM
I have a compact, with a lot of post showing (not got it here at the moment, but probably 10-12" or so?). I have an Al and a Carbon post for it.

Is there a difference? Yes - it's huge - the carbon one looks far nicer. But that's it.

On the other hand, going to a 25 rear (if you are not there yet) or riding 10 psi lower does make a big difference to the ride...
No.DMoore
Sep 23, 2002 10:04 PM
I'm a seatpost junkie. All on the same bike (a Richard Sachs) I've had an older Al Record; Al Dura-Ace; Ti Record; and now a carbon Record. On my Litespeed Ultimate, I've had an older Al Record; Al American Classic; Ti American Classic; Corima Carbon, and WR Compositi carbon. They all feel exactly the same, with the sole exception of the Corima. It was noticeably less stiff feeling. It also flexed visibly from side to side and wiggled noticeably from front to rear. I lived in fear that the damned thing would break and got rid of it.

I'm a hopeless weight weenie and I've played around with lots of posts looking for something sturdy enough to be reasonable, while being as light as possible. In all that fooling around, I've never felt that the composition of the seatpost makes any difference at all in the ride of the bike, unless the post had a problem.

FWIW I ride with >6" of seatpost exposed, so it's not a situation where the post is slammed into the frame.

If you want to change the bike's feel, try wider tires, softer saddle, more padded shorts, or a suspension seatpost. Any of those will make a noticeable difference. Changing the seatpost won't.
Ride qualityMe Dot Org
Sep 24, 2002 7:44 AM
One variable in ride quality is tires. Vittoria Open Corsa CX tires have a great ride, but they tend to flat a lot. It's unfortunate, but the tires that I have found that are a good combination of grip and wear (Michelin Axial Pro/Pro Race) do not ride well.

The other thing you might consider is backing off your tire pressure 5-10 psi for long rides, especially if you are running >=120 psi.