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is US Postal Service missing the boat, marketing wise?(14 posts)

is US Postal Service missing the boat, marketing wise?tarwheel
Sep 13, 2002 10:41 AM
It seems like US Postal could be making some money and getting some free advertising by offering more products that capitalize on their TDF victories. But the stuff they sell on their website is very limited. For instance, I tried to order one of the yellow podium caps that Lance was often photographed in during the tour, but they are no longer for sale. In my post office, they have a cool poster on the wall with Lance in the yellow jersey, but they aren't for sale. Most of the stuff they do have for sale is pretty pedestrian -- like denim shirts. I did print out this coloring book on cycling for kids, which is free at this link:

http://www.uspsprocycling.com/02features/bikecolor.pdf
re: is US Postal Service missing the boat, marketing wise?bikenj
Sep 13, 2002 11:15 AM
Supply and demand. The sport of Cycling in the states is picking up, but nowhere to the levels of let's say, the NFL. Merchandising costs money and I assume the USPS can't justify that type of monetary allocation to TDF merchandise and/or USPS merchnadise beyond what they're already doing.

However, licensing is aother issue. That's money in the bank, but is there a market for USPS licenses.

The USPS is in trouble and needs to focus more on the big picture to enhance consumer equity in the USPS brand. We're already feeling the effects of their financial problems and co-sponsoring a cycling team aint that big a deal in the big picture. And certainly will not turn this ailing company around. Not without major help.

Now FedEx and UPS...There you have brand equity and a greater merchandising opportunity. I can see it now...Le Brown Train...Eh, just doens't sound right.
LOL, I don't think even Mario could pull off a UPS Brown kit :-)js5280
Sep 13, 2002 11:35 AM
That would be U-G-L-Y in spandex, oh the horror!

BTW this are NASCAR jackets so the rednecks might like you thinking you're really a Dale Jarrett fan. . .
What do you have against REDNECKS?RadicalRonPruitt
Sep 13, 2002 3:24 PM
Yes I am one, a real country fried hick if you must, and I love NASCAR. Come on over to the country buddy and live a better life.
Redneck rant just for youteoteoteo
Sep 13, 2002 5:50 PM
“Git‘em! Git’em! Git’em!” yelled in an East Texas redneck drawl. In my mind it was the white trash equivalent of Tora! Tora! Tora! Looking over I saw the mutt in full acceleration, never catching a glimpse of the bottom dwelling squirrel hunting General Lee car look alike having crusty clothed cretin owner that spoiled a quiet country road. The mutt was a pure rookie and I flicked him easily, ending my dog interval quicker than most. In my wheeled world I approach just such canine annoyances as a training technique called dog-ervals.
I try rating my opponents skills based on my own home brewed factors, they are dog-servations if you will. Please try to oblige me in my self-effacing and admittedly bizarre thought process. Angle of attack for example is the first thing one should size up when an attack begins. This was the key mistake the aforementioned mutt made. Just like Maverick in “Top Gun,” I put on the brakes and he blew right by me.
As I laughed off the attempt, I wondered if the owners greasy cousin Jimmie Wayne even had gotten up from watching “Girls Gone Wild” on the sectional sofa to see what the ruckus was about. A vivid imagination never hurts when it comes to such training games.
With the abundance of time on rides to cultivate my theories I have surmised dogs often mimic the actions of many pro riders. Poor canine Durand will chase or attack every time I pass it’s home. The Durand attack will always be just out in front of me and stay there for a long period only to wither as a last minute burst of speed is all that’s needed to blow past.
As I wander a few miles down the road I wonder if the dog could wear that ridiculous looking headband/doo rag the next time I pass. Just to add some realism to the moment. And what if human Jackie were a dog, just what breed would represent him best? In all his French glory I would think a Standard Poodle could be fitting the answer to that question, but by all means make the game your own.
The Mario Cippolini is another one. It’s a dog graced with blistering speed, big white teeth, and plenty of ladies to keep company in his spare time. Mario could beat me ten out of ten tries if the dog-erval was based on speed alone. It takes swift and crafty moves (or an incline) to shake a Cipo. The key is to start wide with plenty of speed and dive across the road at Cipo, sort of like big boned sorority girls dive across a room for free Ranch dip. The dive changes his angle of attack and confuses. In a high stakes game of chicken I win and yell “the podie girls are mine today Cipo”. In the case of the sorority girl the only thing that will stop her are the words “fat free” on the dip label.
Just like individual riders dogs also employ team tactics. Just such an example is the ditch dog. Like the lions of the Serengeti the ditch dog lies in wait to use the element of surprise as well as strength in numbers. Springing out of the grass at just the right moment ditch dogs will use clever cover and their natural surroundings to spring their attacks. These dogs are like Kelme in the mountains except in Texas they use cars on cinder blocks instead of steep ascents from which to launch an attack. They are relentless and seem to come from nowhere, every time you think danger has passed. Marlin Perkins was never so keen at observations as I.
Warning dog is the one that lets the rest of the neighborhood dogs know you’re on the way. They offer no immediate threat but serve as a furry four-legged homing beacon for the rest of their pals, much like a cyclist marking a threatening rider in Letour. Better yet is the drafting or lead out techniques some dogs use. One dog sits in the others slipstream only to jump out at the opportune moment ala Acqua & Sapone.
How to defense the attack is an art form in it’s own right. There are always the time-honored classics like
Redneck rant just for youteoteoteo
Sep 13, 2002 6:01 PM
Git'em! Git'em! Git'em! yelled in an East Texas redneck drawl. In my mind it was the white trash equivalent of Tora! Tora! Tora! Looking over I saw the mutt in full acceleration, never catching a glimpse of the bottom dwelling squirrel hunting General Lee car look alike having crusty clothed cretin owner that spoiled a quiet country road. The mutt was a pure rookie and I flicked him easily, ending my dog interval quicker than most. In my wheeled world I approach just such canine annoyances as a training technique called dog-ervals.
I try rating my opponents skills based on my own home brewed factors, they are dog-servations if you will. Please try to oblige me in my self-effacing and admittedly bizarre thought process. Angle of attack for example is the first thing one should size up when an attack begins. This was the key mistake the aforementioned mutt made. Just like Maverick in "Top Gun" I put on the brakes and he blew right by me.
As I laughed off the attempt, I wondered if the owners greasy cousin Jimmie Wayne even had gotten up from watching Girls Gone Wild on the sectional sofa to see what the ruckus was about. A vivid imagination never hurts when it comes to such training games.
With the abundance of time on rides to cultivate my theories I have surmised dogs often mimic the actions of many pro riders. Poor canine Durand will chase or attack every time I pass it's home. The Durand attack will always be just out in front of me and stay there for a long period only to wither as a last minute burst of speed is all that's needed to blow past.
As I wander a few miles down the road I wonder if the dog could wear that ridiculous looking headband/doo rag the next time I pass. Just to add some realism to the moment. And what if human Jackie were a dog, just what breed would represent him best? In all his French glory I would think a Standard Poodle could be fitting the answer to that question, but by all means make the game your own.
The Mario Cippolini is another one. It's a dog graced with blistering speed, big white teeth, and plenty of ladies to keep company in his spare time. Mario could beat me ten out of ten tries if the dog-erval was based on speed alone. It takes swift and crafty moves (or an incline) to shake a Cipo. The key is to start wide with plenty of speed and dive across the road at Cipo, sort of like big boned sorority girls dive across a room for free Ranch dip. The dive changes his angle of attack and confuses. In a high stakes game of chicken I win and yell "the podie girls are mine today Cipo." In the case of the sorority girl the only thing that will stop her are the words fat free on the dip label.
Just like individual riders dogs also employ team tactics. Just such an example is the ditch dog. Like the lions of the Serengeti the ditch dog lies in wait to use the element of surprise as well as strength in numbers. Springing out of the grass at just the right moment ditch dogs will use clever cover and their natural surroundings to spring their attacks. These dogs are like Kelme in the mountains except in Texas they use cars on cinder blocks instead of steep ascents from which to launch an attack. They are relentless and seem to come from nowhere, every time you think danger has passed. Marlin Perkins was never so keen at observations as I.
Warning dog is the one that lets the rest of the neighborhood dogs know you're on the way. They offer no immediate threat but serve as a furry four-legged homing beacon for the rest of their pals, much like a cyclist marking a threatening rider in Letour. Better yet is the drafting or lead out techniques some dogs use. One dog sits in the others slipstream only to jump out at the opportune moment ala Acqua & Sapone.
How to defense the attack is an art form in it's own right. There are always the time-honored classics like a Cytomax shower, or the Gregory Hines st
Con't. ....third time is the charmteoteoteo
Sep 13, 2002 6:05 PM
Here's the finally to the redneck rant

or the Gregory Hines style Sidi noggin tap dance. My apologies to PETA but were talking saving my flesh here. I can't even say I blame the dog itself; after all I look like a Mini-Nascar in team kit with tiny logos and bright colors.
I have a dainty female friend, who in a panic once spat at a chasing menace. The bewildered beast made it's way back to it's yard while the her impromptu loogi barrage left me more shocked than the dog. The shop I work in keeps dog mace on the shelf and I always wonder who can use it. Seems a little risky to me to wielding mace whilst outsprinting a dog.
In my attempt to make sure I always win the war I am working on a fail-safe dog chaff device. Just like an F-16 jet uses chaff to confuse heat-seeking missiles, my dog chaff will diffuse heavily fragranced nuggets o milk bone onto the pavement as I make my escape. Leaving me safe to cut loose a verbal barrage that will leave that chow with tail between his legs. Heading home for Cousin Jimmie Wayne sitting on his sectional sofa and watching Girls Gone Wild 2. They say it's the best one in the box set.
And wasn't there talk about USPS...DeRanger
Sep 13, 2002 12:15 PM
...ending its sponsorship in 2004? I read somewhere (Velonews?) that some Belgian company is looking to take over sponsorship when USPS' contract ends.

DeR
USPS?mr_spin
Sep 13, 2002 11:39 AM
The Postal Service is just the main sponsor. They don't own the team and probably don't own any merchandising rights.

Someone is definitely missing the boat, however. Think of all guys you see in postal team wear. Most of them would love to buy the current team jersey, but where? They rarely make the clothing available until mid-summmer, if at all. Even on the USPS site, they show the 2000 jersey for sale! That's really sad, because I can buy the kit for every other team back in March!

I saw that poster in the post office, too. I asked about it and the lady behind the counter said you could buy it online "on the site." She didn't say which site, but I couldn't find it anywhere on usps.gov.
www.trekbikes.comBill B
Sep 13, 2002 2:40 PM
Most Trek dealers have all the USPS stuff including yellow podium caps, black podium caps, socks, arm/leg warmers, jackets/vests and a relly cool limited edition team jersey in yellow. They also have access through Trek to a catolog of TdF merchendise, beer glasses, coffee mugs, posters, wine glasses...
re: is US Postal Service missing the boat, marketing wise?moabbiker
Sep 13, 2002 4:55 PM
USPS does not operate like a normal company. Just to introduce new products requires so many hurdles it isn't even funny. That's exactly why USPS is losing so much money as it is.
Pssst!!grzy
Sep 13, 2002 5:17 PM
I hate to break it to you, but when you talk about "marketing" and USPS they aren't in the business of selling little bicycle caps. Nope, they're sponsoring the team to get their name/image splashed so that people will choose their service. There's a heck of a lot more impressions gained from Lance's picture on the cover of news papers, magazines, on the TV, and in front of live fans than selling 100,000 caps to some die-hard bicyclists in Anytown, USA. That cycliing isn't huge in the USA also says something - they're trying to expand their marketshare outside the USA. So the fact that you find it hard to buy a cap shouldn't be a huge surprise. Sad, but true. Just another example of the Post Office not really "getting it." Could you imagine working for them?
Trek isn't any better....cydswipe
Sep 13, 2002 5:32 PM
I mean look, if you are a bicycle manufacturer and wanted people to see your name in conjunction with the biggest event in the sport. Why would you "commemorate" any victory with a $100.00 jersey? Doesn't it make sense to make a $50.00 jersey, sell 5 times more of them, and get "TREK" out there? I'm not the biggest TREK fan. But their marketing idea of "limited edition" USPS/TREK items is bad business strategy. I can see inflated prices for TdF items because of importing the items. But, to jack up prices on hats, jerseys, socks... whatever, you are, instead of creating some sort of high dollar "demand" for items, you are "limiting" the ammount of free advertising -number of cyclists/cycling supporters who can get said items.
Pssst!!I I can imagine, I do work for them. nmbic
Sep 14, 2002 12:54 PM