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This info is very important but a little past it prime...(1 post)

This info is very important but a little past it prime...eschelon
Sep 12, 2002 11:12 AM
I accidentally found this web letter from the USPS site concerning the American people bitching about the USPS sponsoring a pro cycling team when they raised the rates...

Here's the pasted article:

USPS PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND COMMUNICATIONS
Setting the record straight

July 19, 2002

Ms. Janet Clayton
Editor, Editorial Pages and Vice President
The Los Angeles Times
202 West First Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012-4105

Dear Ms. Clayton:

The article by staff writer Lance Pugmire, "Check's in the Mail," contained inaccurate information that I would like to correct, and misperceptions that I would like to clarify.

As Lance Armstrong once again wears the yellow jersey in the Tour de France and is the lead story today in every major newspaper across the country and around the world—including yours—it seems a natural fit that the U.S. Postal Service should sponsor this man and the entire Pro Cycling Team—two American icons proving time and time again what can be accomplished when faced with challenge and adversity.

The U.S. Postal Service provides a vital public service in this country—delivering mail to everyone regardless of geographic location for the same affordable rate. No other organization in the world can accomplish what we accomplish day in and day out. Not Federal Express. Not United Parcel Service. They won't even attempt. What else can you buy in this country or anywhere for just 37 cents? Not much! But for 37 cents you can send a First—Class letter from Maine to Hawaii or from Alaska to Florida and the Postal Service will get it where it needs to be whether it's by foot, car, truck, bicycle, mule, hydrofoil, bush plane, or even Segway Human Transporter.

In 1970, by congressional mandate, we were instructed to operate like a business with our basic function, our obligation to the American people, to provide postal services to bind the nation together through the personal, educational, literary, and business correspondence of the people. By 1981, our operations were no longer funded by tax payer dollars and we were supporting the organization through the sales of stamps and stamp—related products.

In acting like a business, we began advertising our products to fund an ever—increasing infrastructure—we deliver to an additional 1.7 million addresses every year—this is equivalent to a city the size of Chicago being added annually. We began advertising and we began to seek other avenues that we believed would be successful business ventures—some worked, some didn't—the U.S. Pro Cycling Team did—in terms of generating pride in performance among our employees, increased awareness of Postal Service products and services in communities here and abroad, and in terms of generating interest in the business communities that could, in turn, generate income for the organization.

The U.S. Postal Service Pro Cycling Team coverage is also tantamount to millions of dollars in paid advertising. Lance Armstrong's success has been an incredible bonus. We had faith in him all along, just as we have faith in our organization and its employees.

The Postal Service is a $68 billion organization with 750,000 dedicated employees—dedicated to serve the American public—a mission we've accomplished for 227 years and plan to carry out well into the future.

Sincerely,

Azeezaly S. Jaffer, Vice President,
USPS Public Affairs and Communications

Bunch of frickin cry-baby candy-asses...they can all have FedEx, UPS, Flying Tiger, DHL, Pony Express deliver their letters for the competitive rate of $20.00 first class envelope.