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ACL rehab and trainer recommendations(4 posts)

ACL rehab and trainer recommendationsBosephus
Aug 12, 2002 9:50 AM
At the end of the month I'm getting my ACL resconstructed. I'm going to need to spend a lot of time on the bike this fall and winter and wanted some recommendations.

I have a set of rollers, but I'm not going to be able to use those safely especially during the first month or so after the surgury. I don't have a trainer right now.

I think I'm going to need something with adjustable resistance so I can start out with very little and work my way up over the first few months. Should I get something with one of those remote adjustments that mount to the handlebars or should I just get something that adjusts the resistance with wheel speed. Which is more reallistic? ... more beneficial?

Any other general recommendations for someone a little freaked about a surgeon ripping there knee apart?
re: ACL rehab and trainer recommendationsrtyszko
Aug 12, 2002 11:02 AM
Bosephus, bosephus, Bosephus. What can I say? I've been there. Learn to love the spin. I had my ACL done (after ignoring if for 8 years) and I would recommend it to anyone in a similar situation (lots of cracks and pops in the joint as well as lots of subluxation of the joint) My first year after the surgery sucked (a fair amount of pain without a lot of noticible decrease in my symptoms) but ever since I literally never think of it (except when I have to shave the scar cause I'm a roadie geek). My PT and my surgeon were both friends of mine and they coached me through the rehab. Don't push too hard, and basically learn to love the spin and add resistance gradually. I was back on the bike and riding 3 months after and on my mountain bike 6 months after. As for trainers, I think that I'd defer to someone with more experience. I have a wind trainer and I have to get off to adjust the tension which I didn't mind. Also, don't forget to hit the gym for some leg work. One last thought. There is a very good chance that you'll lose quite a bit of leg strength initially but most if not all will return. The muscle wasting probably will not though. One leg will always look a little bigger than the other (and the outside of your operated knee will be numb for life because of the severed nerves.)

Are you ready for some football?
re: ACL rehab and trainer recommendationsyeah right
Aug 12, 2002 11:48 AM
ACL repair and meniscus transplant are the reasons I started biking again. Part of my PT had stationary biking in it, so that's what I worked on, not rollers, or a trainer. Just remember to give it time, and not to rush back to exerting yourself too early, and risk troubles. Instead of anything like rollers, use a trainer or stationary bike that is really stable. If you put your foot down in an attempt to break a fall or something, you might be at square one. Don't worry about coming back to form, I'm way stronger now in both legs than I was then, and nerve damage doesn't occur in a lot of cases, at least not major amounts. Just be careful and have fun while takign it easy, don't feel bad about not being 100% for a while.
Thanks for the advice (nm)Bosephus
Aug 12, 2002 6:21 PM
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