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another century question(14 posts)

another century questionmclamb6
Aug 1, 2002 7:44 AM
my girlfriend would like to do a century. for a variety of reasons(safety, boredom alleviation), i am planning on doing it with her. i am a more advanced cyclist than she is. will training long and slow(i'd only do the long rides with her) have an impact on my fitness/skills(i.e. hardwire my body to a slower pace)? if so, is there anything i can do to prevent this or improve my abilities(i.e. easier gear, higher cadence; harder gear, low cadence power work)? thanks in advance.
Do it all on a fixed.onespeed
Aug 1, 2002 7:55 AM
I do the bulk of my low key rides (60-85 miles) on a fixed. I did a century on my fixed this year and paid for it dearly with a roughed up knee; so I wouldnt recomend longer than that.

A fixed gear bike will add a new dimension to your riding. The guys I ride with call me "the Metronome" because I just dont ever stop.
Do it all on a fixed.mclamb6
Aug 1, 2002 7:59 AM
what kind of gearing did you use? the century itself will likely be fairly flat. also, would there be any difference in whether i actually was on a fixed or if i used my regular bike and never shifted?
42x16. Difference would be you would have a freewheelonespeed
Aug 1, 2002 8:10 AM
The freewheel makes a big difference. A fixed means that you have to keep pedalling. It really makes a difference and translates into a non-stop action when you are on your regular bike-hence the "Metronome" name.

If it is flat, better. No one wants a lot of hills with one gear and no freewheel.
dependsSteve_0
Aug 1, 2002 8:14 AM
do you ever coast?
Do it on a cruiser ...Humma Hah
Aug 1, 2002 8:41 AM
I ride fairly flat centuries on the cruiser geared a little above 2.5:1 (46:18), running wheels just slightly smaller diameter than a roadbike's. Roughly 2.5:1 has been typical SS/fixed gearing for the road since the safety bicycle was adopted about 120 years ago.

Adjust the gearing as you see fit. For hillier runs (such as Solvang last year, 5900 ft of climbing) I resorted to 2.3:1.
CruisersSteve_0
Aug 2, 2002 4:31 AM
I saw a maniac in Kona in '96. Completed the bike on a basket-toting SS cruiser; wearing flip-flops and a bear-guzzler type helmet.

Went on to the marathon in bare-feet (or so I heard).

Finished around 12 hours too, if i recall. sheez

Very funny to see, yet very eye-opening as to how over-seriously many take to their given sports.
did you have to see the doctor(nm)pukka
Aug 1, 2002 8:01 AM
I didonespeed
Aug 1, 2002 8:14 AM
They gave me a cortisone injection and sent me on my merry way. 2 weeks later the pain came back while I was in the 2nd day of a 550 mile ride in horrible weather. I just gritted my teeth and rode through it, and by the end of the 4th day it was gone.

Go figure.
i remember seeing you waiting for your bike at penn stationpukka
Aug 1, 2002 9:38 AM
What bike were you riding?onespeed
Aug 1, 2002 9:55 AM
That is the worst part of that ride.

Waiting for the bikes.
I think that your mind gets used to slower paces. Your bodybill
Aug 1, 2002 8:00 AM
will think that it's fine, and you may even get some rest and aerobic endurance training that will send you to the next level of your own cycling. Miles are miles. This was in Bicycling recently; junk training miles, slow miles, whatever miles, are still miles, and they're going to help. Maybe not the most efficiently, but they're going to help. As The Cannibal says, "Ride lots."
I'm still sorting this out. I just came off about two weeks where my mileage was down, with very little intensity but with a couple of easy rides in there, following a period where I had been doing a lot of intensity (for me). In the last week or so, I'm starting to put a few miles back into the program. I've not tried to go real hard, in part because, it seems, I haven't had to. I suddenly have these legs that I didn't know I had.
Interesting. I've got to go back and read Joe Friel's book again. He (not just he, either; lots of people espouse the same thing) advocates this cyclical view towards training (hey, that's sort of a pun), where you build, peak, and then regroup.
It also depends on what are your goals. If you just have to, do a three-minute interval, circle back, and hook up with your squeeze. In five minutes, do it again.
With easy miles, I think that you may not do much to build your capacity for intensity, but I really don't think you'll lose anything at all. IMHO.
yes...Steve_0
Aug 1, 2002 8:03 AM
training looong and slooow, over time, can adapt your body to that sort activity (i.e., you'll lose speed). You can prevent this, though, by incorporating speedwork (sprints) once/week.

I'd also spin higher gears during the slow rides to keep legs moving fast.
yeah fixedctisevn
Aug 1, 2002 9:11 AM
I did a century on my fixie about a month ago on reasonably flat terrain. I use a 42x15. Ive since used the bike to do ragbrai which was a bit hillier. Ive had no issues with my knee or otherwise. It sounds as if youre perhaps a more advanced cyclist than I so I should think you would have no problems.