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Cassette and Steerer Tube Questions(3 posts)

Cassette and Steerer Tube Questionsken425
Jul 31, 2002 4:22 PM
I have two questions I need some help with.

1. The bike I bought came with an 11-23 cassette. I would like to get a 2nd cassette for use when racing on hilly courses. I have heard that I would probably have to get a different chain to accomodate a 12-27, but that my current chain would work for a 12-25. Would I really need the longer chain for a 12-27? What if I only used the 27 when in my small chain ring?

2. I want to shorten my steerer tube to get rid of the stack washers. (The steerer tube is metal, not carbon fiber.) Do I just cut it with a hack saw? Is there a trick to this?

Thanks for your help.
re: Cassette and Steerer Tube Questionsgtx
Jul 31, 2002 6:08 PM
1. If you are using a 27 in a race, chances are you're gonna be off the back. Go with the 12-25 if you really think you need it. I'm sure your chain length will be fine regardless.

2. Yup, hack saw, but I recommend measuring at least twice and using a guide (Park makes one). You also want to de-bur afterwards. Or just have your LBS do it.

Good luck!
The trouble with raceingSpoke Wrench
Aug 1, 2002 6:03 AM
is that you tend to find yourself in situations where you have to react without taking time to sort out the situation and all of its possible consequences. If you are grinding up a hill in the big ring, you might well jam the rear derailleur into the biggest cog without thinking. If your chain is too short, the result can get real expensive.

Whenever I install a bigger cassette onto a bike, I always test it by shifting gently into the big/big combination on the work stand. If it doesn't work, I always recommend a longer chain. Given a choice between the two, I will always recommend a chain that is too long for the derailleur to take up all of the slack in the little/little combination.

Shortening a steer tube to get rid of the stack washers is a fairly simple task. Lengthening a steer tube that has been cut too short is another matter. If it was my bike, I'd try it out by riding it with the stack washers above the stem for a while before I cut the steer tube.