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How precise is this?(19 posts)

How precise is this?magnum
Jul 17, 2002 8:32 AM
How accurate is the www.wrenchscience.com fit guide? I was trying to get an idea of what frame size I "might" need to rule out manufacturers that don't produce frames in my size.

I'm 6'2.5'' without shoes on give or take a minimal ammount. I measured several times my inseem using a book (of course these measurements were taken by myself) but according to my calculations i have an 86.5cm inseem or 34.1inches. Doesn't this mean that my torso or upperbody is a little over 6 inches taller than my lower body? Anyway wrenchscience apparently thinks I need a 60cm frame. Does this sound right?

I know there have been tons of questions on fit and so on. I'm very sorry if this is a repost.

Are there manufacturers that cator more to bodies that have longer upper bodies?

magnum
re: How precise is this?magnum
Jul 17, 2002 8:34 AM
correction:

my frame size center to top is 60cm and center to center is 58cm
Comparison....tronracer
Jul 17, 2002 8:38 AM
Sounds a tad small. My friend is 6'3" and is riding a 58 c-c. He thinks it is a bit small. Racers usually get the smallest bike they can fit on. Better too small than too big. The best thing ot do is get to a bike shop and take a few out for test rides.
re: How precise is this?Uprwstsdr
Jul 17, 2002 8:47 AM
I'm 6'2" with a 32" inseam and ride a 58cm frame. So it may be correct.
sounds about right but frame measurements varyColnagoFE
Jul 17, 2002 8:55 AM
a 60cm Trek might be way different than a 60cm Colnago. Many manufacturers measure differently so it's hard to compare.
re: How precise is this?magnum
Jul 17, 2002 8:56 AM
correction:

my frame size center to top is 60cm and center to center is 58cm
For instanceColnagoFE
Jul 17, 2002 8:56 AM
I'm about 6'2 with a 36" inseam. I ride a 60cm Bianchi and a 62cm Colnago.
For instancemagnum
Jul 17, 2002 9:02 AM
Okay cool - i thought it could be in the ball park of being close. Keep in mind I did the measurements by myself so they could barely be off - but I tried very hard to get them accurate.

Does the Weight of a rider play a huge role in what bike I choose? I weigh 260lbs or so, but you would never know that by looking at me due to the way I'm porportioned.

I'd like a Carbon bike - but I don't want it to EXPLODE the minute I get out of the saddle :)

As of right now I'm debating on several bikes as I have done quite a bit of research.

Trek 5500
Cannondale 3000 si (2003 model - do the road CDales have the same rep as the mountain - TERRIBLE?!?!?)
Colnago CT1 and Ovalmaster
Litespeed classic and ultimate
and possibly just a few others

I'd much rather buy a great frame and "okay" components for now then upgrade as things wear out.

magnum
I'd eliminate some of these at your weightColnagoFE
Jul 17, 2002 9:23 AM
For the record I weigh 195 most of the time. The LS Classic is gonna be a real noodle at your weight and frame size. The Ultimate might be a good choice in TI as would the Ovalmaster (over the the CT-1 in my opinion) from Colnago might work as well. A Cannondale might be a good choice. Nice stiff AL. Not sure about weight limits on the 5500, but I've heard of some your size riding them. Whatever you do make sure you get 36 spoke wheels built by a good builder. Maybe a set of CXP33s 36 hole with 14/15 spokes and brass nips. You'll destroy lightweight boutique wheels or any lightweight doodad pretty quick. Don't buy super light bars or stems either.
Budget a concern?Brooks
Jul 17, 2002 12:25 PM
A 60cm c-c seems about right. I'm a little shorter than you at 6'-1" and 50 pounds lighter. I got a bike last year from Sampson (www.sampsonsports.com). Eric Sampson went through a number of measurements, riding style, etc. he is a very respected builder in Denver. I got the z7 ProRoad frame. It is titanium with ovalized tubes to keep things stiff for heavier riders/mashers, yet it is comfortable for long rides. With mostly Dura Ace build kit and upgraded wheels, it came to $3K. Other options are less.
For instancemagnum
Jul 17, 2002 9:30 AM
Okay cool - i thought it could be in the ball park of being close. Keep in mind I did the measurements by myself so they could barely be off - but I tried very hard to get them accurate.

Does the Weight of a rider play a huge role in what bike I choose? I weigh 260lbs or so, but you would never know that by looking at me due to the way I'm porportioned.

I'd like a Carbon bike - but I don't want it to EXPLODE the minute I get out of the saddle :)

As of right now I'm debating on several bikes as I have done quite a bit of research.

Trek 5500
Cannondale 3000 si (2003 model - do the road CDales have the same rep as the mountain - TERRIBLE?!?!?)
Colnago CT1 and Ovalmaster
Litespeed classic and ultimate
and possibly just a few others

I'd much rather buy a great frame and "okay" components for now then upgrade as things wear out.

magnum
Go to your LBS....MXL02
Jul 17, 2002 9:20 AM
if you do not have enough experience to know which frame is best for you, you have to go, IMO, to your LBS, try several bikes, and get a feel for what is right for you. The problem with WS is once you've bought it there are no returns. So make sure it is the frame you want. Body sizes and shapes have a great degree of variability, so using only one measurment may not give you the correct "cockpit" size for you. Likewise, frame geometries vary with longer top tubes in some makes, etc. In general, a shorter more classic bike geometry is probably easier for a new rider to get accustomed to. If the LBS want $40 - $50 for a fit kit, buy it. It is the best investment you can make.
Go to your LBS....magnum
Jul 17, 2002 9:36 AM
I can drop the weight (trust me on that) fairly quickly.

I'm sort of ashamed to go to a LBS and start trying to test out bikes.... I know I'm not in the most wonderful shape.

I'd prefer to find the bike i want shopping around and comparing prices. Then, maybe checking online to see what I can do.

This is almost a curse being over 6 foot tall and being a big guy (curse football - it made me this way) :)

arghhh........... what do i do?!?!

magnum
Look Magnum...ignore all the hype on this board.MXL02
Jul 17, 2002 9:49 AM
Many of us are just like you; we started out as overweight middle aged guys using cycling to get in shape, and had to go through the same embarrassments. Not everyone who cycles is a 140 lb Lance look-a-like. In fact, your story sounds so similar to mine its scary. Don't be ashamed to go to the LBS. Even if you decide not to buy from them you will need to establish a relationship with someone to service the bike and help with possible upgrades, or a future new dream bike. They don't mind catering to out-of-shape wannabe cyclists, in fact they can be very helpful.

I will give you this bit of advice...go with steel. It was advice that my long time cycling brother gave me, and it was the best advice I ever got. It is the lease expensive way to get into the sport and gives the best ride for money, especially for heavy riders. Lemond is one brand that has nice steel frames which can be purchased used in the classifieds here. But you do need to determine which frame size is best, and the LBS is the best place to do it.
Look Magnum...ignore all the hype on this board.magnum
Jul 17, 2002 10:02 AM
Hehe I know you're completely right! however, I'm not middle aged - sometimes I wish I could so I could have that I'm older than you and I don't give a damn what you think mentallity - but alas, I'm 20ish. I'm big cause I play(ed) football. I have a sparetire around the middle though other than that I'm just big all round - muscular i guess.

I don't don't care if the bike's made out of corn stalks as long as it is stiff and rigid. I want a real racey feel....
I want an awesome bike.

I guess I could sacrifice frame and buy an excellent grouppo and then later buy a frame and fork only and already have the hardware.

I just need advice........... in short who makes and what models are the bikes that I should look at that aren't going to feel like a noodle under me or explode as soon as I hit my stride?

magnum
re: How precise is this?tarwheel
Jul 17, 2002 9:47 AM
I would be very wary buying a frame using the wrenchscience or colorado cyclist fit formulas. They might get you in the ballpark, but in my experience they recommend frames much too small. If this is your first road bike, I would bite the bullet and pay for a professional fitting (like Serotta) at a good bike shop. If you end up buying from the shop, most will not charge for the fitting. A proper fitting depends more than just inseam and torso measurements. Flexibility is a big issue and is not covered well by the fit formulas. In my experience, the formulas recommend small frame sizes that are fine for racers and very flexible cyclists who like to ride in aggressive positions -- that is, with high saddles and low handlebars. Many cyclists are better served with a more upright riding position -- that is, without much drop from the saddle to the handlebar. I firmly believe that is why many people buy new bikes, ride them a few times and then quit riding -- because they can't get comfortable. For the record, wrenchscience recommended a 54 c-c frame for me -- which is about 2-3 cm less than I find comfortable. I am 5'11" with a 33" inseam and ride a 56 or 57 c-c frame, which seems to be about the right size for most people my height. There is no way I could ride comfortably on a 54 frame.
re: I had the same bike size problem withJL
Jul 17, 2002 12:27 PM
them. I wanted to see what they recommended in the bikes they carried. I ride a 58cm Trek and they recommended something like a 54cm ride. It seems they "make up" the length with LONG stems. They used 13/14 stems on the bikes they recommended. I do think they took the most information for calculation (height wanted between seat/handlebar, some flexibility (touch toes)) but the recommended sizing did seem rather small. I was going to ask here if anyone else had his problem using them, but I wasn't looking for a bike so I decided not too.

You confirmed my questions that they do tend to run small on the sizing.

Happy riding.

John
has anyone bought a frame/bike from wrenchscience?ET
Jul 17, 2002 11:05 AM
Did everything go OK?
re: How precise is this?PMC
Jul 17, 2002 4:23 PM
I just used the size program on Wrench Science and came up with a smaller bike than I prefer. The bars were accurate along with saddle height to the millimeter. At 6'1" it recommended a 56 frame with a 9cm stem on the Aegis Aro Svelte. I ride a 58 Aro Svelte with a 11cm stem and don't feel too stretched out. My other road bike is a steel 59 with a 58 top-tube and 10cm stem that also feels good.

So what I'm saying is you really really really need to ride some bikes just to know for sure.