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Death ride traiing???(6 posts)

Death ride traiing???jeffss
Apr 29, 2002 6:26 PM
I was just wondering if training for the death ride is more difficult than a marathon? I two about 10 years ago and blew out a knee. I did them just under 4 hours? Will the Death ride be easier or harder or is it like comparing apples to oranges? Thanks
Never done one but...tuffnick
Apr 29, 2002 6:45 PM
Its a paced effort like a marathon... but death rides from what I understand go over mountain passes so you gotta rest your upper body on the way up then rest your legs on the way down. Its a lot longer to so the more enduro training you do the better. A marathon is a mix of pure speed and then a lot of endurace. Kinda like a 200 m is so much different than a kilo... kinda same comparison. A kilo is a lot more paced where a 200 isn't at all. But both at the end you should be hurting BAD!

Just my 2 cents!

Nick Corcoran
Riding force behind PODIUMBOUND.CA after I head hit the ground at 60 km/h... basically splitting apart my memory and personality... not a fun thing to go through!
re: Death ride traiing???DougSloan
Apr 30, 2002 7:05 AM
THE Death Ride is 130 miles, half of which is climbing 5-10 percent grades at altitudes from 5,000 to 8,000 feet. There is almost no flat ground riding. It can get sort of hot on the last hill, too. The air is dry and thin. It is hard to injest and digest food with all the efforts of the climbs. It took me around 7.5 hours, where I've done a marathon in 3 hours.

Marathons are much more traumatic to your body. A lot of the training purely getting used to the pounding. Over all, I'd say the marathon is tougher. It just hurts so much. Then again, I'd say the 800 meters is tougher, too, as it hurts so much. Cycling is more of a very smooth, sustained effort. You sit down; it's relatively free of road shock; you have gears to help you climb; you can eat and drink relatively easily while doing it; you are going faster to help your body cool.

I don't think you can compare cycling and running, any more than you can compare cycling and rowing, cross country skiing (actually closer to cycling than running), or most other endurance activities. It's a much different kind of stress on the body.

Bottom line -- I believe it would be much easier to train and finish in the 50th percentile on the Death Ride than a marathon.

Doug
Thanks...jeffss
Apr 30, 2002 3:54 PM
That was the kind of answer I was looking for. It was itelligent and well thought out. Thanks and now it is time to get on the bike. Jeff
My $0.02grzy
Apr 30, 2002 5:02 PM
The marathon would be all over for you in 3 or 4 hours while the DR the is just beginning. Actually the ride doesn't really begin until you head out for Carson Pass. If you train properly you have a reasonable expectation of completing the marathon according to your plans. You can do everything right and still not finish the DR due to "random" events. Part of your training should be focused on the obvious things like miles and veritcal, but you also need to throw a little insanity into the mix so that you can deal with it when it happens. The biggest wild cards are the weather, what you put in your body and the crowds. Any or all of these can easily take you out and experience is the best defense. Many people don't complete their first DR even though they've climbed many feet and ridden many miles. The heat or sudden storms can be the real determiing factors, but lately I think that the other riders are the really scary element. You have all sorts of people out there riding who have no intention of doing all five passes and are just "happy to be there." How about people saying they are going to do the Boston marathon, but they're only planning on doing 10K? They ride four and five abreast while slowly climbing the hills on bodies and bikes that are not up to the challenge. They are oblivious to the fact that people are trying to pass them while climbing and that others are descending in excess of 50 mph. Lately the DR has become popular with the Team in Training and the corporate challenge crowd. While I applaud them getting out and riding a bike I sure wish they'd pick a more suitable event and not muck up this one. I know I sound elitist, but I'm really trying not to. If you want to officially run the Boston Marathon then you must qualify. Same should be true of the Death Ride. Lord help you if you get hurt and wind up in a hospital hours away. Unless they've changed things there isn't a number you can call to contact the organizers. In many ways the training for the DR is the easy part - it's all the stuff you can't control that makes it difficult.

My advice is to skip the circus that is the DR - we go out and ride the passes and self support on other weekends.
part solution for Death RideDougSloan
May 1, 2002 5:20 AM
You are right about the people there. Not your typical quasi-ultra hillclimbers.

Maybe they should do this -- open registration first to those who have completed all 5 passes previously; then let if fill with the others.