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Serotta?(25 posts)

Serotta?elviento
Apr 16, 2002 6:58 PM
Serottas have short toptubes and a very high headtube extension, plus they don't sponsor a pro team, and do a lot custom geometries, so I am wondering if they really target their market at slightly more elderly folks who can't bend down too much, have more spare cash (certainly than that 19 year college kid), are less enthusiastic about pro racers, and often have specific geometry needs (and can afford to have these needs satisfied). Does anyone have insights or any info on this?

It's not meant to be a flame or disparagement of the brand. Just curious. I have seen some Serottas and they seem like well made bikes.
re: Serotta?gtx
Apr 16, 2002 8:25 PM
might say Huffy on the downtube, but...
Andy's shadesmickey-mac
Apr 16, 2002 9:02 PM
Those glasses are the $%!t. I used to have a pair just like them. I'm off to ebay to look for a pair. Thanks for the memories, Hank.
I miss Alcala, too. (nm)mickey-mac
Apr 16, 2002 9:08 PM
nm
Andy's shadesgtx
Apr 16, 2002 9:23 PM
I still have a pair with clear lenses--though I admit I haven't worn them for a while. Yeah, the red lenses look pretty cool. And dig the white Lakes--super pimpin'.
re: Serotta?vitusdude
Apr 17, 2002 3:58 AM
Great pic. Thanks. I'd love to get one of those 7-Eleven jerseys. Sorry about the thread drift.
no helmet...colker
Apr 17, 2002 4:25 AM
that's what i call living in denial. aren't those italian roads a bit dangerous, at high speeds?
re: Serotta?RadicalRonPruitt
Apr 17, 2002 4:43 AM
So that is who built the Huffys for the 7-11 team?
What??!JBurton
Apr 16, 2002 8:56 PM
Look on Serotta's website. There are many instances of pros using Serottas with their sponsors name painted on the down tube instead. www.serotta.com

I have never seen a Serotta like the one you describe. In fact, the Colorado III comes in standard geometries that are not unlike what every other road bike company offers (very similar to the Lemond Zurich and Bianchi Boron). (For that model, custom geometry is a higher priced option). They even offer bikes with the extremely fashionable sloping top tube.

Now, you can get a Serotta with whatever geometry that you require. You might have seen a special one for someone who doesn't have the flexability of a younger rider. But again, all of the Serottas I have seen are very race-able. My Colorado III is lighter, stiffer, and quicker than my previous bike, which is why I chose the upgrade. They are a tad expensive, but well worth the money. They may be above the means of a "19 year old college kid", but what high quality road bike isn't? But, I don't think that the demographic Serotta is aiming for are "elderly folks...,[and those who] are less enthusiastic about pro racers" at all. They are for serious riders, both racing and recreational, looking for a great frame from a great, reputable company with a long, rich cycling history. If you ride one, you will understand.
My perception,TJeanloz
Apr 17, 2002 4:06 AM
And I think the question is all about perception, is that Serotta is targeting the group of riders for whom their poster boy, Davis Phinney, is the greatest rider of his generation. This demographic is not exactly elderly, but not exactly in college either. Personally, I think it's smart marketing- that's the demographic with the money.

But I 100% agree that Serotta doesn't position itself as a racing bike. Serottas are rare in non-masters racing- and despite their claims, I'm not aware of a current pro riding a rebadged Serotta- Phinney certainly did, but that was eons ago.

Don't get me wrong, they are a great frame, but they fall into the category with Seven, Merlin, and Sachs of being above a utilitarian racing bike- a market that Litespeed hits very hard.
I believe Richard Sachs sponsors a local teamdzrider
Apr 17, 2002 7:01 AM
and in New England I see them ridden in races.
He does,TJeanloz
Apr 17, 2002 12:22 PM
Sachs does sponsor a local team (of masters and juniors) but the more telling statistic is how many unsponsored racers are riding the bike.
One questionNessism
Apr 17, 2002 6:01 AM
JBurton wrote:
"If you ride one, you will understand."

What will we learn by riding a Serotta?

In my opinion, the Serotta makes the finest lugged frame in the world. In particular, I like the shaped tubing and matching proprietary lugs.

But they are just a bike frame. Your catch line sounds like some hyped up marketing ad copy.

Ed
Didn't find the reference at www.serotta.com.elviento
Apr 17, 2002 6:33 AM
Maybe they did 20 years ago, but I am not really talking about the history here. Let's limit that to recent models. It's just like Huffy used to be a high end bike brand, but now everyone uses the name as synonym for crappy bikes.

If you compare the geometries of a Colorado III and a Bianchi, the bianchi's toptube is about 2.5cm longer given the same size. Note they measure differently so a 52 Serotta is more like a 55 Bianchi. Besides, Serotta is mainly a ti bike maker, their ti models all have ultra long headtubes.

I am not saying they are not raceable or Serotta is not a reputable brand. I am just wondering if their target market is older folks. Most Serotta ti bike owners I know are over 35.

On their prices, I still think they are a bit too high. Their titanium spacers at $50 apiece seems a bit ripoff to me. I don't believe they are triple butted or tapered anyway. And you can get carbon spacers at CC for $3.9.
You say you aren't flaming but...jtolleson
Apr 17, 2002 7:32 AM
You make reference to "elderly" riders and make the following remark:

"Maybe they did 20 years ago, but I am not really talking about the history here. Let's limit that to recent models. It's just like Huffy used to be a high end bike brand, but now everyone uses the name as synonym for crappy bikes."

It seems to me that your approach to the topic is deliberately controversial. That's OK, I suppose, just don't deny your agenda.

I think Serotta makes some of the most beautiful and high quality steel and ti frames on the market for a host of applications, including -- if not racers -- then the very aggressive recreational rider. Of course, at 38 I'm elderly.
I think you sound more controversial than I waselviento
Apr 17, 2002 10:22 AM
Don't forget I also said "just curious", "I am wondering if", "Slightly more elderly"... "well made bikes".

As for the analogy to Huffy, it's a true statement and I don't think people would dispute that Huffy is now a synonym for crappy bikes, what's controversial about that?
I am talking about their current models and current marketing strategy. Don't see anything wrong with that either.

If you are infering "of low quality" from "targeted at older folks", then you are overly sensitive to say the least. BMW buyers are typically younger than Mercedes buyers, but that doesn't make Mercedes an inferior car.
Oversensitive?jtolleson
Apr 17, 2002 12:26 PM
Nah. I don't even own a Serotta.

I did think that the tenor of your post contradicted your claim. Deep down, you're spoilin' for a fight, it seems. But you aren't going to get one from me. I have better things to think about.

Now run along.
What??!JBurton
Apr 16, 2002 11:07 PM
Look on Serotta's website. There are many instances of pros using Serottas with their sponsors name painted on the down tube instead. www.serotta.com

I have never seen a Serotta like the one you describe. In fact, the Colorado III comes in standard geometries that are not unlike what every other road bike company offers (very similar to the Lemond Zurich and Bianchi Boron). (For that model, custom geometry is a higher priced option). They even offer bikes with the extremely fashionable sloping top tube.

Now, you can get a Serotta with whatever geometry that you require. You might have seen a special one for someone who doesn't have the flexability of a younger rider. But again, all of the Serottas I have seen are very race-able. My Colorado III is lighter, stiffer, and quicker than my previous bike, which is why I chose the upgrade. They are a tad expensive, but well worth the money. They may be above the means of a "19 year old college kid", but what high quality road bike isn't? But, I don't think that the demographic Serotta is aiming for are "elderly folks...,[and those who] are less enthusiastic about pro racers" at all. They are for serious riders, both racing and recreational, looking for a great frame from a great, reputable company with a long, rich cycling history. If you ride one, you will understand.
are you asking a question?tarwheel
Apr 17, 2002 4:13 AM
Not sure what your point is -- are you asking a question or offering an opinion? The standard Serotta geometry is not that different than most Italian bikes. That is, a "square" geometry with top and seat tubes the same length. Perhaps you have only seen some custom jobs. A lot of people buy Serottas for that reason, because they can customize the frame to fit the person. I've seen a lot of Serottas in the area where I live, none with an extended head-tube, although that is an option they offer -- like virtually all custom frame makers. As far as sponsorship goes, it is my impression that Serotta does sponsor or supply some racing teams. I know they have in the past, although not major tour teams like US Postal. Check their website. Finally, Serottas are expensive, like a lot of custom frames. Whether they're worth the money is an individual decision, but lots of Serotta owners seem to think so. Try to buy a used one on eBay and watch how quickly they get snapped up for pretty high prices.
are you asking a question?bigcat
Apr 17, 2002 4:46 AM
Serotta has a lower end bike that came to market this year called the Fierte.The MSRP is $750 for the frame and I think a bike built up with Ultegra is around $1700 american. If you go the Serotta website and go the message board and search for Fierte you will find some people who have built up 18-19lbs bike from standard mid to high range parts (Ultegra). It doesn't have the great tubing as CIII and the CSI but uses the downtube from the CSI and CIII and a custom blend of DB steel.

From the reviews of people who have bought one it is a great ride. The geometry is standard and the bike can't be order with a custom size. It is the hot ticket to join the Serotta world.

Bigcat
I was offering an observation and asking for others opinion...elviento
Apr 17, 2002 6:38 AM
on this topic. That's all. It really stemed from the fact that most serotta owners I have seen/known are over 35, which got me thinking. Maybe my sample size is too small. Again I am talking about recent high end ti models, not older models sold years back. It's normal for a company to have different marketing strategies 20 years ago from today.
no problem ...tarwheel
Apr 17, 2002 7:02 AM
FWIW, I've noticed that the majority of riders I see on expensive bikes (ti, carbon, custom, whatever) in my area seem to be older guys -- 40, 50 and up. It's probably because they are better able to afford the expensive bikes. Sort of like sports and luxury cars. How many 20-year-olds do you see driving Mercedes or BMW convertibles? Another thing is that is many older guys (myself included) are more concerned about comfort and fit -- so they either ride older lugged steel frames (like me) or more expensive ti or carbon bikes. I see very few older guys riding aluminum frame bikes in my area. I did for a short while and quickly got rid of it -- when you're approaching 50 or older, you really start to notice those bumps and vibrations.
There Are Several Serottas in our group...Gregory Taylor
Apr 17, 2002 7:58 AM
The riders range in age from late 30's to 50's. There are a couple of steel bikes (Classic, Atlanta) and a ti bike. They are all ridden agressively, I can assure you. Most were bought because they were nicely made, fit well, handled sweetly, and were a pretty good deal for a (relatively) low volume frame. It also doesn't hurt that our local bike shop is a Serotta dealer, and he has plenty of framesets in stock.

By the way, the standing joke in our group is that we seem to see more women than men riding Serottas. The Serotta contingent is known by the non-Serotta-ites as "PMS" or "Proud Men on Serottas".
re: Serotta?MikeC
Apr 17, 2002 8:01 AM
Ben Serotta has paid his dues, and knows how to build bikes that do their job very well. It's an interesting observation about tt length, but there are plenty of other racing bikes with short tubes, and there are lots of riders who prefer them.
I agree with those who recognize that it's often older riders who buy expensive bikes, but that's because of accumulated wealth and an appreciation for quality, style, and attention to details, not merely because they need to sit more upright. I would doubt that you find many poseurs riding Serottas. You're more likely to find them trying to look like Lance.
On the other hand, if USPS announced that they were being sponsored by Serotta next year (not realistic, I know), I don't think you'd find the team complaining.
Generalizationsgrzy
Apr 17, 2002 9:47 AM
Short top tubes - compared to what? In fact they tend to have the TT 1cm longer than the seat tube, but this relationship is something that can change over the years with trends in the industry. Most bikes have this same realationship - Lemond would be an example where the top tube is relatively long, but this doesn't work for many people. In fact all the higher end Serotta can be ordered with either standard or custom geometry. You can get what ever you want and/or fits. Head tube extensions are done for the simple fact that a -15 degree threadless stem is too low for most everyone. There is also a trend for people to order frames on the smaller side. If you're going to require spacers why not just build it into the frame? At the end of the day you can have whatever you want.

Sponsoring a racing team is usually a PR effort and an overt attempt to gain market share. Serotta has never tried to be a mass marketer of bikes or become a larger company. Their philosophy has been to build the best bike frame, period. Infact Serotta built all of the frames for the US Olympic team a few years back. Finally - high end custom bikes tend to be expensive. You have to have enough disposable cash to drop this kind of money on a luxury item like a custom bike. You probably will never see Serotta bikes in K-mart or Costco or being riden by 19 year old aspiring racers, but then mercedes and Porsche don't target first time car buyers either. Doesn't mean they aren't good bikes. There are lots of small frame builders that don't sponsor race teams. if someone chooses to race on their frame that's up to them.