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Velocity Aerohead Rims, Wheel thoughts(9 posts)

Velocity Aerohead Rims, Wheel thoughtsJekyll
Apr 4, 2002 3:21 PM
Thinking about building up another set of wheels (myself).
Nashbar has Aeroheads on sale for $19.95 per - almost too tempting. The catch is that the sale rims are 28 hole.
My dilemma is as follows: Do I bite on the price and build these up with (probably) Ultegra hubs (spare wheels anyway) or should I not waste the money and stick to 32 hole OP's?
I'm 175 lbs and can be a little hard on wheels. I was thinking about lacing these up 3X with 14/15's.
Also, no experience with Velocity rims though many here seem to have good things to say. How do they stack up against OP's?
re: Velocity Aerohead Rims, Wheel thoughtscurlybike
Apr 4, 2002 3:52 PM
I prefer Aeroheads to OP's they really build up nice and stay quiet. You only save 25 grams by going to 28's. Ultegra hub spoke holes are 2.6 mm, should be 2.3 mm, for longest life you should use brass washers between the spoke head and the rim.
That's the combo I used!speedisgood
Apr 4, 2002 4:27 PM
I basically built the same wheels as you described, except I opted for straight 14 ga. spokes. Brass nips, 3X, 28 hole. BTW, I'm referring to the 650C rims. I myself am around 170 and definitely not gentle on wheels, as I live in Cleveland and the roads are generally crappy.

I built the wheels for my dedicated TT bike, so I don't ride them all the time. However, they have held up very well against running over potholes and large cracks without going out of true. They are very stiff rims, very easy to build and true. I would recommend them without hesitation for you, especially at that price ($120 for a new set of wheels, not bad!) So don't worry about 28 holes; I also have a couple sets of 28 spoke 700C's: ZIPP 303's and Campy Omega Stradas (semi-aero profile), both of those sets have held up just fine for road and crit racing around here.

My only argument against the Aerohead wheels for training is that you'll need either long stemmed tubes (hard to find durable LS tubes) or a valve extender for your regular length valves.
That's the combo I used!Andy M-S
Apr 4, 2002 7:14 PM
You said...

My only argument against the Aerohead wheels for training is that you'll need either long stemmed tubes (hard to find durable LS tubes) or a valve extender for your regular length valves.

To which I reply...

Hm. I've never needed LS tubes for my Aeroheads. They have about the same height as a Sun ME14--very slightly aero. Certainly no need for special tubes!
That's the combo I used!speedisgood
Apr 4, 2002 7:27 PM
I feel weird saying this, but my stems aren't long enough :-/

I tried to inflate tires using just regular stemmed tubes but my Silca chuck BARELY gets enough seal on the very tip of the valve. I actually have to hold the chuck on with one hand and pump with the other. Too much hassle. Maybe it's easier with a chuck/pump head with a flip lever?
"My stems aren't long enough"Ahimsa
Apr 4, 2002 7:58 PM
Don't they make special pumps for that? You know, to make your stem bigger?


Ah, never mind.

A. (The joke was old before I even got started)
ditto.... LS tubes not needed.......... nmJohnG
Apr 4, 2002 9:37 PM
Guess I'm in the minority then . . .speedisgood
Apr 5, 2002 6:09 AM
so go ahead and get the rims w/o reservation!
Don't do it.Ahimsa
Apr 4, 2002 4:31 PM
Granted the rim itself is probably as important as the spoke count...

But as soon as one of 'em goes out of true you will immediately blame it on the low spoke count and never want to ride the wheels again. Stick to 32 if you are hard on wheels.

I ride 36 rears and 32 fronts or 36 on both just so I needn't worry much about bashing around. Then again I probably ride a bit differently than most.

Cheers!

A (Never spend a dime if you question the purchase before you even open your wallet)