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Is this frame to small???(35 posts)

Is this frame to small???Natchez
Feb 28, 2002 11:59 PM
The reach is good the seat is right but is the frame to small? I know it is but do you think I can get away with it?
Thanks for your help and thoughts?
ya kinda' left out a few details...Tig
Mar 1, 2002 12:14 AM
...like your measurements and the frame size or measurements.
ya kinda' left out a few details...Natchez
Mar 1, 2002 12:26 AM
I will be glad to give the measurments but what I am really asking is does the bike look strange or harmfull. I am 5"11.5 my inseam is 32.5 The frame is a 55
you're not seriouslyMJ
Mar 1, 2002 1:48 AM
asking if the frame looks strange or harmful are you? (this may be one of the strangest posts I've ever seen on this board - you need to be careful who you ask such questions or you'll get locked up)

it looks like a bicycle - bicylces, as inanimate objects, are never strange or harmful - if you'd like advice about whether your bike will fit you based on a photo you need to give some comprehensive measurements of you and the bike

what kind of bike is it?
what's the rest of the bike's geomtery?
what are the rest of your measurements?

if you're really concerned about the bike you could
1. have any demons that may be present cast out by a religious/holy man
2. visit your local bike store (LBS) and have them take a look
work it out yourself...how??Spirito di Finocchio
Mar 1, 2002 5:22 AM
http://www.bsn.com/Cycling/ergobike.html

my opinion is that if its a 55 seat tube center to center it should be ok by raising the seat post but you will need to be pretty flexible to get down on the bars properly. if its 55c-top then it may be a tad small.

you may be having trouble with this by the look of the stem spacers and stem angle but if you are comfortable then thats all you need. if you have knee to elbow clearance then you will be fine in keeping it rather than losing money and buying another.
I'll take a stab ...tarwheel
Mar 1, 2002 5:38 AM
I'm almost exactly the same height and inseam as you. If I were getting a Litespeed, I would probably go for the 57 because I prefer a more upright riding position. As you can see, this bike already has a lot of spacers and a riser stem, so it's doubtful you'd be able to raise the bars any higher. So it alls boils down to how flexible you are and what riding position you prefer. If you like to ride with low or mid-level handlebars, it probably would fit fine. If you prefer higher bars, say 1" below the saddle or higher, than it probably would fit a little small. Some fit formulas would say this is just the right size, but most of them (in my experience) tend to err on side of going smaller with frames and recommend aggressive riding positions with low bars.

As far as looking strange, I wouldn't worry about that. The style Nazis might criticize you for using a lot of spacers and a riser stem, but comfort is the most important thing. My frame is a 56 (c-c) with spacers and a riser stem, and it fits me great. I could care less what others think because I'm the one riding it. The fact is, with the new threadless forks and stems, you've got to use spacers and riser stems if you prefer a higher handlebar because you can't simply move the stem up like you can with threaded/quill stems -- unless you want to go the custom route and build a frame with a extended head tube. (Another option is to buy a Serotta headtube extender, which adds about 2 cm to the head tube.)
if it was more widely known....Spirito di Finocchio
Mar 1, 2002 5:53 AM
serotta would make a fortune just selling their headtube extenders alone. i see so many riders with spacers and such and really wonder why more manufacturers dont offer extended headtubes as part of their model ranges. im not saying that a rivendell position is for everyone but a pro racer flexibiltiy is not within a lot of peoples reach either, especially with threadless forks and stems.

i travelled far and wide before finding a new light frame with a threaded carbon fork so i could use my position friendly quill stem. for my next frame i will probably have to go custom to acheive the same. and i actually do change the height of the stem depending on the pace, distance and relative shape im in - something i greatly appreciate and would be sadenned to give up.

and by my actual calculations the 80-100 grams by using the "old system" is something i gladly put up with.
my next bike will be probably be a custom for that reason alonetarwheel
Mar 1, 2002 6:07 AM
Fortunately, a few of the bike manufacturers are seeing the light and building their frames with extended headtubes (ironically, Litespeed is one of them). In my case, I'm 48 and just don't have the flexibility to ride with my handlebars 2-3 inches below the saddle. So, if and when I get another bike, I'll probably go the custom route and have them add 2-3 cm to the headtube.

I agree with you about the Serotta headtube extenders. They are a little pricey, though, at $60. But hey, if you've got a ti Litespeed, it's seems like the only way to go.

Ultimately, I think the market is going to force manufacturers to either make bikes with higher headtubes or optional extenders. I couldn't comfortably ride most of the stock frames made by major US manufacturers because of the aggressive positions required with their frames. Try to set up a TREK carbon frame with your bars close in height to the saddle -- it can't be done without a bunch of spacers and riser stem.

BTW, it's doubtful most people save any weight with threadless setups if they prefer a higher handlebar height. It's not recommended using a carbon steerer with a lot of spacers, so you're forced to use a fork with an alloy or steel steerer. By the time you add in the additional weight of the long steer tube, it probably weighs more than the traditional threaded setup.
at 48 you should be riding a rivendellyungpup
Mar 1, 2002 6:44 AM
he has forgotten more $hit than you will ever know nmSpirito di Finocchio
Mar 1, 2002 6:52 AM
wish I could afford onetarwheel
Mar 1, 2002 7:49 AM
For $2,300 and 12 months waiting list for a Rivendell, most of use are forced to explore other options.
you shouldn't be allowedMJ
Mar 1, 2002 5:51 AM
to have a Litespeed if you're asking questions like this - did you get a U-Lock when you bought it?
i think your seat looks way too highishmael
Mar 1, 2002 5:59 AM
ive got a 32 inch inseam and i fit on a 52 and my seatpost doesnt have nearly that much showing...a 55 sounds fine if thats c to c..
It's too smalljtolleson
Mar 1, 2002 8:30 AM
I ride a 55 cm Litespeed (they measure c-t, and the TT is 55.5) and I'm 5'7". My cycling inseam is a full 1 inch shorter than yours.

This bike has got to be too small for you. Dangerous? That seems a little dramatic. Uncomfortable and inefficient? Maybe.

Ditto that your post was very odd, especially your initial reluctance to post your own measurements.
Yes.... most likelyphilippec
Mar 1, 2002 3:43 AM
Yes, I believe it is to small-

I am 5'11", inseam 32" and ride a 57-58 cm. In particular, I ride a 57 Litespeed. Have your size checked properly at your local bike shop or check out any of the available on-line sizing aids (I like the one at www.Cyfacusa.com). Also, given the fact that you are set up with your stem rising and the small seat to handlebar drop, I would guess that you could probably use a more aero-position on your bike -- if you are interested in achieving that.

A+

Philippe
Try an excorism nmDaveL
Mar 1, 2002 4:14 AM
re: Is this frame to small???ALbikeguy
Mar 1, 2002 4:43 AM
Ship it to me and let me ride it for awhile, I should be able to determine if it's OK for you by..... say mid Nov.
May be small, how does it feel?dzrider
Mar 1, 2002 5:37 AM
Seat post is up pretty high and the seat looks to be set all the way back and the bars and stem are up pretty much too. All these adjustments effectively make a frame larger.

If the reach is good and the seat is in a comfortable place what are you worried about?
yupmapson
Mar 1, 2002 5:44 AM
look at all those spacers! post is way up and seat is pushed back, long stem. it's too small, but no dnagerous
yesripSRV
Mar 1, 2002 6:33 AM
Ride it anyway. At least its not a compact.
Only one problem that I can see.Spoke Wrench
Mar 1, 2002 6:40 AM
You've got enough money tied up in this bicycle that it's going to keep you from trying out bikes that fit you decently so that you can see how much fun you are missing.
So, how much seatpost do y'all feel should be showing? nmbill
Mar 1, 2002 7:00 AM
nm
old skool says 1 fistbn
Mar 1, 2002 7:11 AM
nm
re: old skool says 1 fistcyclopathic
Mar 2, 2002 4:13 PM
old school rule was coined when saddles were double railed and had springs (like Brooks B66), so add 1.5"
12 inches if you are a bike messenger nmSpirito di Finocchio
Mar 1, 2002 7:49 AM
12 inches if you are a bike messenger nmSpirito di Finocchio
Mar 1, 2002 7:50 AM
This is a weird post.Elefantino
Mar 1, 2002 7:49 AM
Actually, I'm REPLYING to weird post.

Anyway, you began by asking if the fame is too small, that you "know it is" but you asked if you could get away with it. Get away with what, or for what?

Then, you asked if anything on the bike looked "strange or harmful." Harmful? To what? You? The environment?

I'm afraid you're asking questions that can't be answered by this board. Only by you.

If it feels good, do it. Or buy it. Or whatever the intention.

FWIW,
Mike
Not really. The guy is saying that his seat height andbill
Mar 1, 2002 8:07 AM
bars are set up for an acceptable position, so that the objective distances are good, but, to get those distances, has he exposed too much seatpost and too much steerer tube/spacer/stem angle? He's not asking you to fit him on this bike; he's already done that. He wants to know whether, by using what he has used to obtain this position, he has compromised the integrity of the parts or of the bike as a whole.
IMHO, it's probably more an aesthetic assessment than anything. As long as he remained within the tolerances for exposed seatpost, steerer tube above the headtube, etc., than I assume he'll be okay. I suppose that the only problem would arise if he wanted to change to something with different less generous tolearances. I guess he just wouldn't be able to do that.
Just needs translationscottfree
Mar 1, 2002 8:08 AM
I think he's just wondering if the bike looks so funny that us snobbish roadies will make fun of him. The answer is probably yes. I think by 'harmful,' he's wondering if this setup will cause him pain or strain something. The answer is, nothing in the setup per se would be 'harmful.'
So what's the answer, Natchez?tarwheel
Mar 1, 2002 8:28 AM
Curious minds want to know. Is this your bike, or one you are considering buying? I had assumed this was a bike you saw on eBay or somewhere and was considering buying. But others seem to think it's your bike.
So what's the answer, Natchez?Natchez
Mar 1, 2002 11:33 AM
The bike is mine I have a 1000$ in it. I have been riding it for a few months. I bought it used at LBS who is a litespeed dealer. As I have learned more I think the LBS took advantage of my ignorance. Although I got a good price. Sorry for the ambiguity in my post I was not very articulate it was 1:30 in the morning when I posted it. Some times on long climbs I have thought the bike my need an exorcism. On my first century I was sure I was putting my self in dnager. Since I am a pastor I thought about doing the exorcism myself but thought you guys might have more experance with bike exorcism.

seriously,
I was concerd that I might have too many spacers and seat post for the integrity of the fork, seat-post, and frame
It is an alloy steerer. I was also concerned that it looked bad aesthetically.

Bill hit it spot on great job of in interpretation.
"Not really. The guy is saying that his seat height and"
bars are set up for an acceptable position, so that the objective distances are good, but, to get those distances, has he exposed too much seatpost and too much steerer tube/spacer/stem angle? He's not asking you to fit him on this bike; he's already done that. He wants to know whether, by using what he has used to obtain this position, he has compromised the integrity of the parts or of the bike as a whole.
IMHO, it's probably more an aesthetic assessment than anything. As long as he remained within the tolerances for exposed seatpost, steerer tube above the headtube, etc., than I assume he'll be okay. I suppose that the only problem would arise if he wanted to change to something with different less generous tolearances. I guess he just wouldn't be able to do that.


Thanks
A Litespeed dealer sold you that?!Shite
Mar 1, 2002 12:08 PM
they ought to shot.... don't tell me, it was Spokes in IL, right?
It's a great bike. Don't worry about it.tarwheel
Mar 1, 2002 1:25 PM
Regardless of the fit, $1,000 is a great price for a Litespeed. Although you wouldn't need as many spacers, etc., with a larger frame, there's nothing wrong or unsafe with your setup. My bike has nearly as much seatpost showing and a similar setup with spacers and riser stem. FWIW, most fit formulas would recommend that size frame for your size. The problem is that if you prefer a more upright position, which you clearly do, then the fit formulas tend to put you on too small a frame. But you're not way off, just a little smaller than ideal.

Unfortunately, for many of us, the only way to find an ideal sized frame is to get a custom -- which is expensive. I'll get by just fine with my spacers and stem until I can afford to go that route.
Disagree strongly!Spoke Wrench
Mar 2, 2002 6:46 AM
This bike is the poster child for the perils of buying used. There's usually only one, so people get mezmerized by a low price and try to force a fit where it doesn't exist.

Let there be no doubt. This bike doesn't fit. Natchez says he thinks it handles funny on hills and long rides. For that matter, why'd the subject even come up in the first place? As I said in my earlier post, the real pity is that Natchez now has all of his money tied up in this bike so he'll probably ride it like it is, and he'll never learn how much more comfortable and fun a properly fitting bike can feel.

I don't mean to pick on Natchez. A few months ago, Dog shared with us how he cut the steer tube on a very expensive fork too short. The point of both of these situations is to learn from them. There are clearly some good deals available on used bikes. However, if you aren't totally confident that you understand sizeing, insted of saving a few hundred dollars, I think that you are apt to make a thousand dollar mistake.
If he has fit himself to the bike, why would it handle funny?nmbill
Mar 3, 2002 7:42 PM
nm