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Tough decision- Giant TCR or GT Lotto issue(5 posts)

Tough decision- Giant TCR or GT Lotto issuepeloton
Jan 30, 2002 9:52 PM
Okay- I'm buying a new frame to build up and I have two choices. I pretty much have weighed the issue and know which I will probably choose, but I'll throw this out anyway. I can get both the GT Lotto issue frame and the Giant TCR frame for about the same price. I'm looking for people's opinions and experiences with either. I know about possible warranty issues with GT, and I'm not interested in any other frame because of shop team stuff (I can get these cheap, basically). Anyone who has been riding either of these frames, I would value your opinion. Thanks
Owned a TCR and loved itspookyload
Jan 30, 2002 11:05 PM
The bike is a bike you have to control, as it is nervous in its ride. But it is a good thing if you plan on doing any crits or much hill climbing. It is way light too. The GT on the other hand is a more stable bike. It too is a nice bike. I only rode one a very short distance, but it has a classic road racing feel. The best comparison I could make is the GT is a more mature feeling bike, while the Giant is a teenage wild child. Both have their places, but you have to decide which is right for you.

The GT warranty issue is a big deal. I ride with a friend who is fighting Pacific on a warranty about his broken I-drive GT. The seat tube seperated from the main frame due to shitty welds. All he can get is a run around. He had to buy a replacement because he doesn't think GT/Pacific will come through with anything.
re: Tough decision- Giant TCR or GT Lotto issueKEN2
Jan 31, 2002 8:58 AM
Can't help you on the TCR, but I bought a 58 cm GT ZR1 and built it up last fall and it is a great road ride--stable but not sluggish, responsive and stiff but not harsh. I weigh 190 and I think these bikes tend to feel best to heavier people rather than lightweights, who can feel beat up by the ride.

As far as warranty issues, the only problem with GTs are the I-drive bikes which I would avoid. Welds are beautiful on this bike and I've heard of no warranty problems.
As I've said before...nigel
Jan 31, 2002 8:18 PM
...and certainly don't mind repeating, I absolutely adore my TCR.

I have a size-small 2000 TCR2 (which has 105 components--pretty much flawless, BTW). The bike with these components weighs either 17 lbs. or JUST over 17 (JUST), according to my rather accurate home scale. The tubing and geometry allow it to accelerate and climb like MAD--very efficient transfer of power with this bike. I disagree--quite respectfully, might I add--with Spookyload on the "have to control this bike" issue, but I came from a 48cm, fairly tight-angled steel frame. I find the steering solid (and I have a 9cm stem on it); quick but not track-bike quick. This, however, is just my feeling with my particular riding experience and setup.

Additionally, the carbon fork and seatpost look GREAT and, I'd wager, do wonders for comfort. I say "I'd wager" since I haven't ridden my bike with another fork or seatpost for comparison. Carbon fiber has been proven to absorb road shock, naturally, and these both are very aerodynamic and beefy--and are real head-turners, as is the frame on its own.

A very comfortable and smooth ride (I have the stock Open Pros and rode the stock XO saddle until recently) which is even great over 125-mile rides (about 25 of which are crappy city streets). This in such a small, tight aluminum frame, is a rare thing from what I hear.

You know my vote.

Best of luck,
Nige
thanks guyspeloton
Jan 31, 2002 10:56 PM
I placed my order for the TCR frameset. I had been leaning in that direction for some time, and I think it will be a nice ride. Thanks for everyone's input.

I going to build it up with some old and some new stuff- Cinelli controls, Dura-ace/Ultegra mix, Mavic Cosmics, and the carbon post from Giant. I'm pretty psyched to see the finished product.