RoadBikeReview.com's Forum Archives - General


Archive Home >> General(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 )


litespeed tuscany - any input?(13 posts)

litespeed tuscany - any input?franz
Jan 25, 2002 10:04 AM
I've found a good deal on last years tuscany frame for $1000 bucks new. I've never ridden Ti and am curious since I've only ridden steel frames (my old waterford paramount finally bit it - Crack!) does anyone ride one of these frames and do they like it or have had any problems?
thanks
I've always heard that the Tuscany was the real gem ofbill
Jan 25, 2002 10:14 AM
Litespeed's lineup. No frills, absolutely the best bang for the buck, solid ride. My primary source for this is a Cat. 1 racer and professional fitter who was working in a shop that sold Litespeed, Seven, Serotta, Bianchi, an Trek (some others, too, I guess). He frequently recommended the Tuscany to people who wanted performance without necessarily paying for chi-chi exotica.
A gem and frillspmf1
Jan 25, 2002 11:58 AM
I think the Tuscany is the vest value in the LS line. Its made of butted tubes that are shaped and (I think these days) tapered. Its a much more high tech bike than its competitor the Classic that costs and weighs more.
re: litespeed tuscany - any input?Mootsie
Jan 25, 2002 11:51 AM
I've had steel, aluminum and Ti. Without getting into the esoterics of tube shape (which can make any material perform like any other) generally Ti is a nice blend of the other two. Comfortable ride with some complience and light weight. After you ride Ti, you'll never go back to the other two.
Well, I don't know about that. I think that they all have abill
Jan 25, 2002 12:05 PM
reason for being, and, although the only high-end bike I've ridden at length is my current steel, I understand (and believe) that good design in the high-end stuff at least neutralizes some of the less desirable characteristics of any material, including the storied stiffness of alu. I also have a Litespeed Natchez, 1998 vintage, which is hardly state-of-the-art, even for 1998, but it ain't shabby, either. The Litespeed is a very comfy, more forgiving ride, but the steel Pegoretti is just a more refined and better bike. I bought steel because one afternoon I rode a friend's early '90's Masi, and I just had to have a steel bike.
a buddy rides onedzrider
Jan 25, 2002 12:23 PM
B4 he got it he was agonizing over the money; now he tells everybody that it's a great value. He does some long riding and has been doing it for many years. His opinion is worth something to me.
Hey franznothatgullible
Jan 25, 2002 12:23 PM
Where did you get that deal on the Tuscany. I have been thinking about one myself.
an LBS in Virginia has it on sale - nmfranz
Jan 25, 2002 1:33 PM
I ride an Arenberg.......STEELYeyed
Jan 25, 2002 3:51 PM
its a step below the Tuscany,which I have also ridden,I could not tell the difference between the two. Although at 5'9" 145lbs.I probably couldn't flex wet noodle, the AL bikes I have ridden seem harsh and high-end steel was more money than the LS,I didn't have a material preference,I just wanted a comfortable bike that fit me and my riding style.
re: litespeed tuscany - any input?InCline
Jan 25, 2002 4:49 PM
Great price for a terrific bike! I spent a month at the LBS,custom specing mine, and enjoyed every minute. Due to the fair weather this month I've been able to ride over 200 miles, and really love the Reynolds fork, Campy racing triple, Daytona pedals, Proton wheels,Chris King headset, Thompson seat post, Deda bars, Salsa stem, Selle saddle. The long and short of it is, you can build a dream machine from this frame. By, the way it's a terrific ride in terms of handling, climbing, and comfort.

The only mistake you could make is passing this one up, if the frame is the proper size.
Don't waitInCline
Jan 25, 2002 4:53 PM
Great price for a terrific bike! I spent a month at the LBS,custom specing mine, and enjoyed every minute. Due to the fair weather this month I've been able to ride over 200 miles, and really love the Reynolds fork, Campy racing triple, Daytona pedals, Proton wheels,Chris King headset, Thompson seat post, Deda bars, Salsa stem, Selle saddle. The long and short of it is, you can build a dream machine from this frame. By, the way it's a terrific ride in terms of handling, climbing, and comfort.

The only mistake you could make is passing this one up, if the frame is the proper size.
re: litespeed tuscany - any input?DEANguy
Jan 25, 2002 5:40 PM
Great frame. Rode one for three years. The only reason I sold it was because it was a little small for me. There is a lesson for you-make sure it fits. I believe it is the most bang for your buck in the Litespeed line. You can't go wrong, especially at that price.
I have one and love it...PdxMark
Jan 26, 2002 8:53 AM
I can't compare it the whole spectrum of steel, other Ti, caorbon, etc... but I like it... as said above though ... make SURE it fits you... fit, fit, fit, fit... a poorly fitted frame (stem, handlebars, seat position, etc.) will undermine even the very best frame design

my Tuscany replaced a Klein Stage Comp... another great bike... but the Tuscany takes the harsh edge off of rough (chip seal) roads and the occasional pothole (Like this month's Bicycling magazine "what does your bike say to you" question... "Are you just not seeing all those potholes?") For centuries and double centuries, a can feel and appreciate the difference.

The Tuscany feels as efficient in climbs as the Klein and handles as well too (Time HSC 3 fork - carbon steerer tube). Tuscany felt stiffer than the Arenberg to me (165#). Built it up with Campy Chorus 10.... A great bike. Didn't compare higher end Litespeeds... There are lots of Tuscany reviews on the review portion of roadbikereview.com.