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Resting Heart Rate(27 posts)

Resting Heart Ratecolosipm
Dec 20, 2001 7:58 AM
In trying to determine my resting heart rate I strap on a chest transmitter and keep my HRM on my wrist every night with a timer. In the morning I stop the timer and get the average HR from the previous night. I do it this way because every time I do it when I first wake up it seems to spike JUST because I'm awake.

Is this an okay method, or is the spike what I want to measure, or should there be no spike at all?
re: Resting Heart Ratecioccman
Dec 20, 2001 8:09 AM
Well, you've measured both your heart rate at wake up (typically considered resting) and your avg. heart rate through a night's sleep. I'd say you've got your bases covered.
Ditto (nm)Indiana Rider
Dec 20, 2001 8:41 AM
You can take even a worthwhile thing too seriouslycory
Dec 20, 2001 8:41 AM
No reason it shouldn't work...but is it healthy to care so much? Why not just lie there for 15 seconds and count the beats?
Navel gazingscottfree
Dec 20, 2001 9:15 AM
I think we all do way too much of it, with our training logs and charts and stats and focus on our 'performance' etc. I hope we don't all start wearing HRMs through the night now too.
LOL!cioccman
Dec 20, 2001 9:24 AM
I was thinking the same thing.... whew....
Come on!....Let's not stiffle the young Edison!!....nmjagiger
Dec 20, 2001 10:22 AM
re: Resting Heart Ratekoala
Dec 20, 2001 9:32 AM
In the years gone by I trained by resting pulse and we did not have heart monitors. I suppose as long as you establish a good baseline(not sick, overtrained etc.) and use that as abenchmark what does it matter whether you were sleeping or not? By the way, how much lower is it sleeping than awake?
re: Resting Heart Ratecolosipm
Dec 20, 2001 10:20 AM
I don't really know.

Two years ago when I was a junior in college and I didn't own a HRM I took it by laying flat and still for 3 minutes with deep breaths, it was about 50.

Then came tow years of triathlon training, not all of it intelligent.

Now I've started to train intelligently and I bought an HRM. In the mornings it seems like when I wake up (after the alarm goes off) that my hr is like 70. But when I get the average over the night it's always 53-55. This morning I woke up and it was 60, which prompted the day off I'm enjoying now.

But I want to know if my hr avg. over the night could be affected by dreams, tossing turing, etc. I can continue taking the avg. overnight, and if that will give me a good understanding of what my heart is up to I don't care. BUT if it is not, and I should be measuring just when I wake up then I'll have to refine my technique.

I find it difficult to get my heart rate first thing in the morning, 'cause I'm alrady moving around and active (by turning off the alarm, and lifting my arm to my neck).

This is a long response, but I have a lot of questions.
re: Resting Heart Ratecioccman
Dec 20, 2001 10:32 AM
Of course your heart rate will be affected by movement, i.e., dreams, sitting up, turning to get the alarm, flapping your arms around violently, etc. You've measured your avg. during the night and your "resting", just like everyone else, after turning off the alarm, etc. You've got your values. They're good ones. It's truly insignificant if your resting rate is 50 or 60. Now, if you couldn't get it down below 100, ever, that's significant.

If you want to know whatever else is going on with your heart, go see your doctor, ask for a stess test. Ask him if your pvc's and pac's are in line. Get a cholesterol test and ask him about hardening of the arteries. Tell him your family heart history.
re: Resting Heart RateMel Erickson
Dec 20, 2001 10:40 AM
It doesn't really matter whether you check your heart rate before or after shutting off the alarm. Maybe it's 10 beats higher after moving around a bit, so what? What's important is measuring your "resting" heart rate the same time each time you measure it. If you measure after shutting off the alarm each day and one day it's 55 and the next it's 65 you know you're overdoing it and need an easy day or some rest. Resting heart rate is just a comparative measure, a tool to guage your training effort and it's affect on your body. Select a time to measure and use that as your baseline time. After a week or so you'll know what your average "resting" heart rate is and you'll be able to tell whether you're overtraining or your fitness is improving.

Now, take that silly thing off and get some sleep, sheesh!
re: Resting Heart Ratecolosipm
Dec 20, 2001 10:49 AM
so taking the avg. over the entire night works just as well as taking it the same time every morning, because it's consistency, and that's all that matters?
Well, maybeMel Erickson
Dec 20, 2001 12:01 PM
But it's much simpler to just take it at the same time, after doing the same thing (i.e. shutting off the alarm) in the morning. You might find more variation taking the average for the entire night because you don't know what you've been doing while you're sleeping. The other night my wife got little sleep because I was playing soccer all night. I have no doubt that type of activity would affect my average heart rate over the course of the night versus a night when I didn't dream as much. Just take it after shutting off the alarm and be done with it!
Wait. What about...Kristin
Dec 20, 2001 11:04 AM
...the concept that a lower resting heart rate means a healthier heart and a more efficient workout. Is that only a concept or is it fact? Because if its true that the lower your heart rate the better your performance on the bike, then doesn't 10 beats make a difference? ...affect your thresholds, etc?
Exactly my pointMel Erickson
Dec 20, 2001 12:09 PM
If one morning your heart rate is 10 beats higher than your "normal" resting heart rate it's an indicator that something has changed. You might be sick, overtraining, whatever. As you train over time your resting heart rate should fall, but, of course there's a physiological limit. For instance, it'll never get to zero! ;) You and I could be equally fit and have different resting heart rates. I'd be very surprised if they were the same. I'm not sure if it affects your upper thresholds or not. My guess is not much as both your minimum and maximum heart rates are probably hard wired. The problem is we can test for and measure the maximum but are never sure when we've reached the minimum, at least I'm not aware of a test for minimum. Anyone out there know of one?
Wait. What about...koala
Dec 20, 2001 2:18 PM
I am 45, my resting is 45 and my cholesterol is 266 and my triglycerides are 588. My doctor says all a low resting means is each beat your heart pumps a larger volume of blood. you could still be on the threshold of a heart attack. One of the tour riders who finished 3rd in a lesser tour(switzerland?).
Wait. What about...koala
Dec 20, 2001 2:20 PM
I am 45, my resting is 45 and my cholesterol is 266 and my triglycerides are 588. My doctor says all a low resting means is each beat your heart pumps a larger volume of blood. you could still be on the threshold of a heart attack. One of the tour riders who finished 3rd in a lesser tour(switzerland?) has a 55 resting. Its one indicator but far from the whole picture.
The dawn effectVelocipedio
Dec 20, 2001 3:32 PM
Your heart rate will always rise in thr process of awakening. It's part of the dawn effect -- your liver releases glycogen, your adrenal system releases adrenaline ans your heart rate rises. In fact, you will also notice that your HR remains relatively high [20-25% above resting] for about 30 minutes after you wake up. Your adrenaline and glucose levels are higher at that time, too.
Strange questionKristin
Dec 20, 2001 4:41 PM
Is it normal to find your heart racing sometimes when you wake up? This happens to me about once a week. My best guess it that it occurs when I am awakened from non-rem or deep sleep. But my HR can hit near 200 when this happens. Its weird.
As I'm reading this....look271
Dec 20, 2001 6:50 PM
"too much information running through my brain
too much information driving me insane"
Is streaming through the live feed from WXPN. Coincidence? I think not. You are thinking WAY too much.
re: wait a minuteguido
Dec 20, 2001 11:43 AM
Kristen's right. A major benefit of fitness is a healthy heart, which aside from being small and smooth muscled, will not have to beat as fast at rest. I've been going on the assumption that 55-60 is about right if you're fully recovered from any kind of activity, and sitting down at rest, but you guys are also probably right that there are variations in healthy, fit people.

On the other hand, an "elevated heart rate" in a fit person is usually a symptom of overtraining. Is this possible in December? To be sure, I'd go get a stress test.
And you will live longer....Bruno
Dec 20, 2001 11:56 AM
at least that's what I want to believe. If you have a very efficient cardiovascular system (because all of the exercise) your heart will beat at a lower rate all the time (resting or just while walking). If it beats less it should last longer and you should live longer. Having a low resting heart rate it's an indicator of fitness and 10 bpm, in my opinion, is a lot. I know people with resting HR of about 50 but I don't know anyone with a resting HR of 40 like many pro athletes have. Most people that do not exercise are around 60-65 bpm. That is 20% more beats the heart has to do than a fit person with 50 bpm.
Ever have that chest-crushing feeling ....Brian C.
Dec 20, 2001 11:56 AM
... that sense of dread when you realize you've lost your keys?
You've check all 10 pockets of your cycling threads at least four times; scanned the ground over and over, and the clerk at the coffee shop is getting annoyed that you've just asked him for a third time if a set of keys were left behind.
They're gone. And your bike's tied to a tree outside the coffee shop.
So there I was, and just as the panic was starting to set in, I happened to glance at my HRM. It was racing along at 106.
Caveat: If you wear your HRM all night, try not to dream about losing your keys.
:-)
Or playing soccer. nmMel Erickson
Dec 20, 2001 12:12 PM
Ever have that chest-crushing feeling ....Brian C.
Dec 20, 2001 11:56 AM
... that sense of dread when you realize you've lost your keys?
You've check all 10 pockets of your cycling threads at least four times; scanned the ground over and over, and the clerk at the coffee shop is getting annoyed that you've just asked him for a third time if a set of keys were left behind.
They're gone. And your bike's tied to a tree outside the coffee shop.
So there I was, and just as the panic was starting to set in, I happened to glance at my HRM. It was racing along at 106.
Caveat: If you wear your HRM all night, try not to dream about losing your keys.
:-)
It's hard for me to rest when I'm worried about my heart. nmdzrider
Dec 20, 2001 12:32 PM
Restless?guido
Dec 20, 2001 12:57 PM
Go on a ride. Attack the hills. Hard. You'll feel much better afterwards, and your heartrate will go way down.