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Motivational Issues(12 posts)

Motivational Issuesgodot
Aug 28, 2001 10:15 AM
This is my first full season on a bike. I had been doing very well. I met and supassed all my goals heading into the year (granted, I had no idea what to expect so they were probably set a bit too low). Rode my first century a few weeks ago, no problems. Got invited to go on a ride with some people I'd never ridden with before and ended up being one of the stronger riders in the group, took a lot of pulls, had a great time.

Now for the problem: Since that ride I have been completely unmotivated to go riding. In the last 2 weeks I've ridden around 100 miles. I'm used to riding around 150 or more a week.

Any advice to getting out of a slump? Do I just need a break? Time to hit golf balls and forget the bike until next year?

Thanks
Kevin
re: Motivational IssuesSomeone
Aug 28, 2001 10:22 AM
your done, finnished kaput, it's all over. take up lawn bowling
re: Motivational IssuesSpinchick
Aug 28, 2001 10:30 AM
I can't say I relate to the "forget the bike til next year." However, I have had a couple of days where I actually did not feel like riding. It must have been an overtraining problem because after a couple of days off, I was ready to go again. I have a hard time with rest days. I know I need them but I usually have to force myself to take them.
re: Motivational IssuesTig
Aug 28, 2001 10:42 AM
Take a short break.

Ride with a group that is faster than you are used to. You will find there is still plenty of challenge yet discovered out there.

Try a new place to ride. You may even drive to another town and explore new rides.

If all else fails, buy an exotic dream bike. You won't lose motivation with that to ride, but if you do, the guilt of letting it collect dust will force you back out there! -J/K'ing
dont take off until next year!urfast
Aug 28, 2001 10:51 AM
if you abandon now, you will lose whatever you gained by putting in 150 every week. I agree with taking a couple of days off or even buying some new equipment (cyclocross bike/carbon shoes, whatever). its hard to stay motivated sometimes, but try to mix up your rides.

if all else fails, buy the merckx documentary from World cycling productions. should do the trick.
Sign up for more organized rides, diversify your activitiesJS5280
Aug 28, 2001 11:07 AM
Nothing like plunking down some $$$, ideally for charity, to keep you motivated. Plus you can't go looking like a Fred so you have to train. Planning a few organized rides throughout the season helps keep me motivated. You can also diversify, go mt. biking, train for/try a triathlon, doing something else aerobic, etc. Sometimes though, you just need to take some time off. I like to do that in July/Aug when it's the peak of the hot season. It's also a good time to do swimming (i.e. triathlon) and work on that upper body and stay cool at the same time. Good luck!
You're NormalJon Billheimer
Aug 28, 2001 11:16 AM
It's normal to experience a letdown following a concentrated push to achieve some goals. So first of all congratulations! Give yourself a pat on the back, take a week or two off, then consider following through on some of the above-mentioned suggestions. Chances are you'll return to the bike mentally and physically refreshed. During your hiatus start ruminating on goals for next year and sort of let them simmer. Don't however take the winter off or you'll lose most of the fitness gains from this year. Do a winter program that includes both the bike and other activities. Then after the new year start to refine your focus towards your new goals.
Where you mind goes...Whipper
Aug 28, 2001 11:50 AM
So I'm stuck in the middle of the same thing. After a whole season of breaking new ground I find myself uninterested in riding. Here's the trick out. First, set new almost unreachable goals and work on your weaknesses. If you are a great sprinter, take some long hilly rides. Second, go for solo rides. Not on the same areas. Find some new road/routes to follow. Where your mind goes your body will follow. If your mind in stimulated by what your doing then your body will respond.

Here's a new challenge for ya. On a long flat area try what I call "dead leg sprints" (you'll understand the name in a minute). Warm up for about 15 minutes and get up to a respectable speed. Next increase your gearing to a really tough cadence. What you want to do is three minutes in a big gear with a 70 cadence. If that is too hard then lower the gear but keep the cadence the same. If your not in pain by the second minute your not working hard enough. do three sets. You'll be amazed with the speeds you can reach. This excercise will also help to raise your lactate threshold and strenghten your heart.
pull yerself together mansteveuk
Aug 28, 2001 12:15 PM
all great tips. It looks like you have achieved some goals and now you loose the motivation? just get some more goals. aim high. you will never be as fit again as you have been this year - never. Now doesn't that make you want to go out and prove me wrong??? most of all you MUST enjoy every ride. Build yourself up then when u get out there have a quick think - is this the most incredible fun or what?? If it's not try another active sport. The most important thing is you keep yourself fit + healthy throughout your life - many sports will do it - golf is too easy by itself surely?
re: Motivational IssuesDINOSAUR
Aug 28, 2001 12:45 PM
Motivation is a big problem for me. At age 59 I really don't burn up the roads anymore. Sometimes the biggest obstacle is just getting on your bike. Yesterday I didn't feel like riding but I went anyway. About 1 mile into the ride I came around a curve and encountered a doe and her three fawns standing alongside the road gazing on the embankment. When they saw me they frooze for a moment then took off running, and one of the little fawns stumbled on the soft dirt, and for a brief instance I was so close I could have touched it. Then I remembered why I like to ride. Little stuff like this happens to me all the time. We view the world through different eyes.
I hit slumps all the time, I regulate my riding by alternating hard and easy weeks. You can't go out and hammer everyday. Make cycling fun, goals are good, mine are simple, just go out and ride and return home safely without crashing. Everything in between is gravy.
IMHO: if this is your first season the best is yet to come. You will suffer, and learn to deal with pain, fatigue, and frustration. But persevere you are only bound to get better and improve, the best is yet to come.
Also- motivation is the number one reason why folks abandon the sport, even the pros deal with it. Find out the really reason you like to ride. For me it was the experience of the ride and that feeling of being outside in the elements.
It's all in your head, that's half the sport..
re: Motivational Issuesgodot
Aug 28, 2001 1:06 PM
Thank you....

A couple of things really stick out after reading some posts. My other main activity this summer had been sand volleyball. That ended just about the same time my cycling slump began. It seems like I had something that gave me a bit of balance in my activities, and when that ended it never got replaced with anything. I hadn't considered that as a possibility. Need to find something to fill in the gap before it's time to start getting ready for ski season, swimming may be the perfect answer.

I also think I need some new challenges, and couldn't think up any good ones (or was too lazy to). When I do get out and ride, I still enjoy it. It's just become a chore getting out the door. Having something to focus on for a ride would help.

Thanks to everyone for their help and insights. I appreciate it.
Got just the thing for you!LC
Aug 28, 2001 6:58 PM
Get a Mt Bike, even a old clunker will do. Go out with the local MTB club and hit the trails. You will get a break from the usual and pick up some skills that will help you on the road; who knows maybe even save your life one day when you come up to something on the road and bunny hop it.