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Want to buy my first road bike. Need advice.(7 posts)

Want to buy my first road bike. Need advice.Empirion
Aug 16, 2001 8:42 AM
I'm a XC mtbr and I've never been on a ride with a road bike. I really want one bad now. My price cap is going to be $1200. Do you have any advice on what bike I should research? I'm pretty sure I want steel cause the roads in my town are pretty bad and I need something a little forgiving. Steel will also last me a while and I like to upgrade my bike rather than buy a new one in the future. Also do I want the triple chain ring? I like to think I'm a fairly strong rider and I've heard that a triple chain ring configuration makes you less of a man to others. Thanks.
re: Want to buy my first road bike. Need advice.mlbd
Aug 16, 2001 9:09 AM
check out the '01 Lemond Buenos Aires...should be on sale soon. the '02 is a bit more expensive but i think they added a new bike at about your price range for '02.

also check out bianchi (campione is in that range i think).

i tested both lemond and bianchi and had a hard time deciding. i went with the '02 Buenos Aires.
Look at a Specialized Sirrus.wink
Aug 16, 2001 9:12 AM
I am also ex mtb. Did not know what to do, so I a bought a specialized Sirrus Comp. It is kind of like a super hybrid. It comes in three grades, Sport, Comp and Pro. Comps run about $900. Just an idea..
Unless you're climbing walls you don't need a triple.Pack Meat
Aug 16, 2001 9:12 AM
You should be able to pick a production (Trek, Specialized, Cannonwhale) for that price. Always check the classified ads here on RBreview to find a deal on slightly used stuff. Go for a carbon fork if you can, they really smooth out a ride even on a steel bike. Al, steel, carbon all last about the same length of time. You shouldn't notice the difference unless you're putting on 20k a year.

As with a mtb, get the best frame you can get for the $$s and upgrade components as you go. Fit is more important on a standard road frame than on a compact frame or a mtbike frame, find a LBS that works with roadies and not one that just carries a few road bikes.

good luck
PM
I must climb a lot of walls then. nmMB1
Aug 16, 2001 10:30 AM
re: Want to buy my first road bike. Need advice.filtersweep
Aug 16, 2001 5:44 PM
I was in your shoes recently, bought a cheeep bike with Sora, and the LBS was kind enough to let me exchange it for full credit toward a better bike. I'd at least get 105 components. I have aluminum with a carbon fork... no problems. Yeah, I have a triple, but never have used the tiny gear... big deal. I didn't exactly want a triple, but this time of year there are great deals on the 2001s.... If you are spending $1200, you might want to bump it up to $1400 or so, that seems to be the price around here where things start really happening.
re: Want to buy my first road bike. Need advice.Lone Gunman
Aug 16, 2001 6:14 PM
Let me blow that "less of a man" crap out of the water right now. This is simple due diligence and experience. With a triple you have 25 possible Shimano gear inch combinations 30/42/52-12x25 there are 2 overlap gearinch combinations. You will never use all of them, there is no need. Most of your riding will be in the 42 or 52 chainring with the 42 12-25 gear inches being used and mostly the top 4/5 gearinch combinations on the 52. The 30 you might use the bottom 4 to climb really steep and or long hills. The 42x25=45GI. The double chainring in a 39x25=42GI. Most of the time you don't go to the small chainring to use a 32,35, or 39GI but it's like AC on a hot day, you turn it on if you need to. At 42x25, I am climbing at a higher GI than the guy with the double, I have an option to drop down lower, I am too proud to push. The myth of the sissy triple is that, a myth. DA is now coming with a triple. It is a matter of preference. If you live in the hills, consider the triple. Flats, get the double. Cassettes are easily switched out to accomodate.