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What is your resting heart rate?(38 posts)

What is your resting heart rate?ALLEN
Jul 9, 2001 11:21 PM
Jim Smith posted this in the triathalon board; It didn't get that many responses there. I thought it was a good topic, so I'm posting it here.

Mine is 55 bmp, (I'm 16 and weigh 120lbs.)

Do heavier and/or older people usually have a lower resting heart rate?
re: What is your resting heart rate?mike mcmahon
Jul 9, 2001 11:29 PM
Mine is usually within a few beats up or down from 50. I'm 22 years older and 55 pound heavier than you are, so the answer to your last question must be yes. ;-) Actually, I don't know the answer to that question.

P.S. I saw your message in another thread about Phoenix. Riding out there is great in the late fall, winter, and early spring, but it's brutal the rest of the year. I haven't ridden there in about 10 years. Have they repaved the road up South Mountain recently?
Yeah, most of the time it's nice here in Phoenix.ALLEN
Jul 9, 2001 11:47 PM
I have to get up at 5:00 every morning & ride to avoid the heat. I can't wait for the fall & winter!... great weather...big rides/races. I don't know about South Mountain, (Iv'e never been there); but I want to, it seems nice.
Yeah, most of the time it's nice here in Phoenix.mike mcmahon
Jul 9, 2001 11:53 PM
Fortunately I never had to spend a full summer in the Phoenix (actually Tempe), so I avoided the hottest time of year. If I recall correctly, South Mountain is about 7 miles of climbing, but I don't remember the elevation gain. The descent is a lot of fun. I remember passing a vacationing family in a station wagon with Kansas plates. Dad looked like he didn't have much experience on mountain roads, and the entire family was looking at me like I was an alien as I went by them. If you do ride up there, just be careful because the top of the mountain is a popular spot to drink and smoke dope.
Sounds fun!ALLEN
Jul 10, 2001 12:11 AM
I'm a pretty good climber, so it should be fun! Thanks for the "top of the mountain" tip.

I should probably be getting to bed... it's 11:15 PM in Phoenix, & I have to get up early.

Have a good night, Bye.
answersFrenchPress
Jul 10, 2001 5:47 PM
No, they have not repaved South Mtn. Well, if they did, it's a bad job. I was up there about 4 months ago, so maybe since then. Nice climb though.

Yes, Arizona in general sucks this time of year. Way too hot. But, the Fall & Spring is nice. Great riding.

My resting HR at 5pm is 59, but at 7am it's in the low 40's. I hjave seen it as low as 38 when I raced, but not any more.
re: What is your resting heart rate?Dutchy
Jul 9, 2001 11:36 PM
Sitting at my desk at work, my resting HR is 60. I'm 31 5'9 weigh 68kg/150lbs?. I believe weight can have a slight affect on resting HR. CHEERS.
Hard to believe!walbro
Jul 10, 2001 11:09 PM
Average resting heartbeat for the peleton starting the Tour: 53 bpm. Amazing that a random sampling of a bunch of amateurs has, on average, a lower rate than the finest athletes in the sport. Maybe everyone should list their European palmares next.
Hard to believe!AD14
Jul 11, 2001 6:03 AM
In my defense(i am married to a lawyer)my 45 resting pulse is low for a 45 year old in poorer shape than 99% of the guys on this board but its genetic. My dad has a resting below his age (68) and he no longer runs or does anyhing aerobic. I think too much is made of resting pulse. In the years when I was in great shape my pulse dipped into the 30s and there were local racers who could better me(I was better at racquet sports and actually played high level tournament tennis). Even if everyone is on the level about their pulse I dont think it really means that much.
re: What is your resting heart rate?Akirasho
Jul 10, 2001 12:13 AM
... there are too many variables involved to sum up heart rates based on age or weight (though these are factors) alone.

There are several good text on the subject with respect to training with an HRM, and specifically with respect to said training as it relates to cycling (Precision Heart Rate Training edited by Edmund R. Burke PhD, THE HEART RATE MONITOR BOOK by Sally Edwards, The Cyclist's Training Bible by Joe Friel).

A person may lower their resting rate through training (aerobic exercise) however, some cardiovascular diseases may also lower the rate. My rate has crept up over the years (I'm 45) from an alarm tripping low of 36 bpm (I was in a CCU (age 30ish) because, along with the low rate, I was throwing a few PVC's around... turned out to be normal for me... kept the nurses on their toes till they turned the alarm off) to around 48 when in training.

Conversely, my MAX HR was recorded at approximately 196 bpm during a stress test (same hospitalization) but has since dropped to around 183 bpm.

If you have specific questions about your rate, at your age, I'd consult your family physician... you're probably undergoing physical changes which can also affect heart rates... most certainly consult your doc before you begin any new strenuous training regimin.

Be the bike.
re: What is your resting heart rate?dustin73
Jul 10, 2001 12:47 AM
well, i'm (19yrs old) 6', 165 and mine is about 72...a friend of mine who did athletics all throughout high school was 82. he's about 6'3", 220, pure muscle...he's also 19.
re: What is your resting heart rate?AD14
Jul 10, 2001 4:34 AM
I am 45 and its 45 on a good day, 47 on a tired one. When I was 30 it was in the high 30s. Of course that was also 20 pounds ago....
re: What is your resting heart rate?Duane Gran
Jul 10, 2001 5:24 AM
This morning it was 43, and it typically registeres in the 40-45 range. You should probably qualify what you mean about resting heart rate though. Most people interpret it as your HR when you wake up in the morning, not your HR when at rest in the mid-day. In the mid-day my HR is usually about 50-55. Also, I'm 27 and 152 lbs.
6'2" 195# 29yo 60bpm now, at work--was 80 bpm s.t. last yr NMHaiku d'état
Jul 10, 2001 7:07 AM
Age:39, Weight: 185lbs Height: 6'1" Resting HR: 46-50 (nm)PaulCL
Jul 10, 2001 7:10 AM
nm
re: What is your resting heart rate?ScottH
Jul 10, 2001 7:13 AM
My resting is around 68-70 and my max is 203 on the bike, 207+ running. I'm 30, 6'1", 155lbs.

My understanding is that the time it takes your HR to recover (don't ask me to define this) is a better indicator of fitness level than your resting HR.
ExactlyMabero
Jul 10, 2001 8:40 AM
"My understanding is that the time it takes your HR to recover (don't ask me to define this) is a better indicator of fitness level than your resting HR."

This is the biggest indicator of your fitness level thus why interval training can be so fun and is widely used. It focuses in on the exact recovery time it takes your heart rate to stabilize (not down to a rest rate though) before we explode into heavy work again.
A NYT article about Heart Rate Recoveryno excuses
Jul 10, 2001 9:33 AM
The Times usually needs a web subscription to get to an article, so I printed this one on the importance of heart rate recovery, and some evaluation levels.

BTW Resting HR - 45 BBM, age 49, M, Ht. 6'2" Wt. 285 (I must look like a wide load coming down he road).

June 24, 2001
With Heartbeats, Slow Is Good, Steady Not So Good
By GINA KOLATA
T was a quandary all too familiar to cardiologists. Here was a middle-aged man who might — or might not — be on the verge of developing heart disease. His cholesterol was fine, but many people who develop heart disease have normal cholesterol levels. His blood pressure was fine. He did not smoke. But his family history was sobering. His father had developed diabetes and high blood pressure and ended up with two bypass operations. His father's father had suffered a heart attack.

So Dr. Michael Lauer, the patient's cardiologist and the director of clinical research at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, asked himself: How aggressively do I treat this man? Or does he need treatment at all?

Dr. Lauer turned to a test that is only now entering clinical practice but that can be as powerful as cholesterol levels in predicting risk of heart disease and sudden death. He put his patient — Dr. Mark Kreindel, himself a cardiologist — on a treadmill, then measured how quickly his heart beat returned to its usual rate after exercise.

The results of such tests, cardiologists are finding, are surprising and counterintuitive: the steadier the heartbeat, the sicker the heart.

"If you were to ask people, `Would you rather have a heart that beats irregularly or a heart that beats like a metronome?,' everyone would say they want a heart that beats like a metronome," said Dr. Daniel Levy, the director of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study. The study, which began in 1948, has followed more than 10,000 residents of Framingham, Mass., collecting information on their health and heart disease. But the data from the Framingham study and others consistently show that the more regularly a person's heart beats, the greater the risk for heart disease.

At the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Dr. Lauer likes to illustrate this to medical students when they visit the cardiology ward there. "We go into the room of a very sick patient," he said, "and I'll say, `What was that patient's heart rate yesterday?' " The students will look at the chart and give an answer, say 121 beats per minute. Then Dr. Lauer will ask them to take the patient's pulse. Invariably, the heart rate will be the same 121 beats per minute.

"But if we go into the room of someone who's relatively healthy," he went on, "the heart rate will be bouncing around."

The explanation, experts say, involves the two competing nerve networks that control the heart's beats. The sympathetic system speeds up the heart, the parasympathetic system slows it down.

In healthy people, the two systems are constantly working in opposition, making the heart rate fluctuate. But, said Dr. Arthur Moss, a heart disease researcher at the University of Rochester, "the sicker the heart, the greater the likelihood that it will be dominated by the sympathetic nervous system."

He added, "If the heart is weakened, you can influence the output of blood by stimulating the heart to beat faster." And "if you stimulate the heart, the heart rate will be more regular."

As the sympathetic nervous system flogs the heart more and more, the heart can falter. "It's very much like whipping a tired horse — you get dysfunction," Dr. Moss said.

The theory predicted that a steady heartbeat would signal a heart that needed constant stimulation from Rest of article to follow
Rest of NYT Articleno excuses
Jul 10, 2001 9:36 AM
As the sympathetic nervous system flogs the heart more and more, the heart can falter. "It's very much like whipping a tired horse — you get dysfunction," Dr. Moss said.
The theory predicted that a steady heartbeat would signal a heart that needed constant stimulation from the sympathetic system, and so, it predicted, a steady heartbeat would signal a damaged heart. But it did not answer some practical questions, like how do you measure heart rate variability, and how important is it in predicting risk?
Dr. Lauer and his colleagues realized that the recovery rate of the heart after exercise can be a simple yardstick. He found that people with heart disease have rates that fall very slowly after exercise, less than 12 beats in a minute, as compared with healthy people, whose rates fall by an average of about 20 beats, or with elite athletes, whose rates can fall as many as 50 beats. To demonstrate that the slow decline in heart rates among people with heart disease is caused by a suppression of the parasympathetic nervous system, researchers gave athletes a drug, atropine, that temporarily blocks those nerves. "The high-class athletes looked like the heart failure patients," Dr. Lauer said. "Their heart rates did not fall at all."
TO determine whether these measurements can be used to predict the risk of heart disease, Dr. Lauer and his colleagues did three studies involving thousands of people, some with heart disease, others who seemed healthy. In every case, he said, the result was the same: those whose heart rates fell by less than 12 beats in the first minute after exercising had four times the risk of death over the next six years as those whose heart rates fell by more than 12 beats.
Dr. Moss and his colleagues at the University of Rochester are using a more precise measurement of heart rate variability — determining the exact interval from one heartbeat to the next by asking patients to wear portable devices that record every beat. They studied patients who had recovered from heart attacks and followed up 30 months later. Those whose heart rates had the lowest variability had a 40 percent mortality rate. For those with an intermediate level of variability, the mortality rate was 15 percent, and for those whose heart rates were the most variable, it was 10 percent.
Now Dr. Moss is leading a national study that is recruiting 1,200 heart patients to see whether having an automatic defibrillator implanted in the chest can save lives. A secondary goal is to determine if heart rate variability can identify those who will benefit most from the devices. Defibrillators, about half the size of a package of cigarettes, are placed beneath the skin and are signaled by a wire that is placed directly in the heart. When the defibrillator senses that the heart is starting to beat erratically — a condition that can lead to death from totally uncoordinated attempts at a heartbeat — it administers an electric shock to bring its rhythm back.
But the devices are expensive — to have one implanted, Dr. Moss said, costs about $25,000 — so there is a strong need to know who will benefit from them. His hypothesis is that patients whose heart rates are the steadiest are most likely to be helped by a defibrillator. Until the study is completed, however, he cannot say if his hypothesis is correct.
For patients like Dr. Kreindel, the treadmill test, measuring how quickly his heart rate falls after he stops exercising, can help answer the question, to treat or not to treat?
The test was not easy, Dr. Kreindel said. "I felt like I was going to fall off the treadmill." But when he slowed down, his heart rate plummeted.
"He turned out to be low-risk," Dr. Lauer said. No treatment was warranted.
"People who are at high risk, the philosophy is, `Let's get to work here — we've got work to do,' " Dr. Lauer said. "But people who are at low risk should be left alone. Giving them treatments is an enormous waste."
Copyright 2001 The New Y
Rest of NYT Articleno excuses
Jul 10, 2001 10:44 AM
As the sympathetic nervous system flogs the heart more and more, the heart can falter. "It's very much like whipping a tired horse — you get dysfunction," Dr. Moss said.
The theory predicted that a steady heartbeat would signal a heart that needed constant stimulation from the sympathetic system, and so, it predicted, a steady heartbeat would signal a damaged heart. But it did not answer some practical questions, like how do you measure heart rate variability, and how important is it in predicting risk?
Dr. Lauer and his colleagues realized that the recovery rate of the heart after exercise can be a simple yardstick. He found that people with heart disease have rates that fall very slowly after exercise, less than 12 beats in a minute, as compared with healthy people, whose rates fall by an average of about 20 beats, or with elite athletes, whose rates can fall as many as 50 beats. To demonstrate that the slow decline in heart rates among people with heart disease is caused by a suppression of the parasympathetic nervous system, researchers gave athletes a drug, atropine, that temporarily blocks those nerves. "The high-class athletes looked like the heart failure patients," Dr. Lauer said. "Their heart rates did not fall at all."
TO determine whether these measurements can be used to predict the risk of heart disease, Dr. Lauer and his colleagues did three studies involving thousands of people, some with heart disease, others who seemed healthy. In every case, he said, the result was the same: those whose heart rates fell by less than 12 beats in the first minute after exercising had four times the risk of death over the next six years as those whose heart rates fell by more than 12 beats.
Dr. Moss and his colleagues at the University of Rochester are using a more precise measurement of heart rate variability — determining the exact interval from one heartbeat to the next by asking patients to wear portable devices that record every beat. They studied patients who had recovered from heart attacks and followed up 30 months later. Those whose heart rates had the lowest variability had a 40 percent mortality rate. For those with an intermediate level of variability, the mortality rate was 15 percent, and for those whose heart rates were the most variable, it was 10 percent.
Now Dr. Moss is leading a national study that is recruiting 1,200 heart patients to see whether having an automatic defibrillator implanted in the chest can save lives. A secondary goal is to determine if heart rate variability can identify those who will benefit most from the devices. Defibrillators, about half the size of a package of cigarettes, are placed beneath the skin and are signaled by a wire that is placed directly in the heart. When the defibrillator senses that the heart is starting to beat erratically — a condition that can lead to death from totally uncoordinated attempts at a heartbeat — it administers an electric shock to bring its rhythm back.
But the devices are expensive — to have one implanted, Dr. Moss said, costs about $25,000 — so there is a strong need to know who will benefit from them. His hypothesis is that patients whose heart rates are the steadiest are most likely to be helped by a defibrillator. Until the study is completed, however, he cannot say if his hypothesis is correct.
For patients like Dr. Kreindel, the treadmill test, measuring how quickly his heart rate falls after he stops exercising, can help answer the question, to treat or not to treat?
The test was not easy, Dr. Kreindel said. "I felt like I was going to fall off the treadmill." But when he slowed down, his heart rate plummeted.
"He turned out to be low-risk," Dr. Lauer said. No treatment was warranted.
"People who are at high risk, the philosophy is, `Let's get to work here — we've got work to do,' " Dr. Lauer said. "But people who are at low risk should be left alone. Giving them treatments is an enormous waste."
Copyright 2001 The New Y
re: What is your resting heart rate?Tahn
Jul 10, 2001 7:14 AM
Mine is around 60 at mid-day (resting). I am 37 and 140 lbs.
However someone once told me that the heart rate (bpm) is not the same if you are counting your pulses on your wrist as opposed to wearing a heart rate monitor on your chest! He said they are 2 different things and will yield 2 slightly different numbers. I checked mine using both methods and they are usually 4 or 5 bpm apart.
Is this true? Can someone explain or shed some light please.
re: What is your resting heart rate?Scott Barrett
Jul 10, 2001 7:38 AM
5'10" 30yo 214lbs - morning 48-52. Max HR 207. I also have LVH which may affect the numbers a bit....
re: What is your resting heart rate?Jim Burton
Jul 10, 2001 7:41 AM
I would specultate that it is because when taking your heart rate yourself, you count an exact number for a given interval (10sec, 15sec, etc) and multiply it by whatever (x6, x4, respectively). Your heart rate monitor is counting the time in between your beats. It would come up with a different, more real time rate. Plus, monitors have a display delay built in so that they don't read errant information as often, so it ends up giving sort of an average of several readings, while throwing out wild fluctuations. This is different for every brand heart rate monitor, though and even different brands worn at the same time can give readings of 2-3bpm difference. I wouldn't worry about it. A good heart rate monitor is about as accurate as a heart rate monitor (ecg) at a hospital (or accurate enough to train with. I wouldn't want to wear one, rather than hospital equipment if having a heart attack!).
55 bpm, 48, 5'11", 176 lbsHumma Hah
Jul 10, 2001 8:34 AM
Fitter people usually have lower heart rates. Dead people have the lowest, however.
What about a Dead out-of-shape person then? (nm)Mabero
Jul 10, 2001 8:42 AM
6'0", 163lbs 45 years old, resting 52 (nm)Len J
Jul 10, 2001 8:37 AM
re: Resting Heart RateJon Billheimer
Jul 10, 2001 8:53 AM
Age, 56, Wt., 161, Resting Heart Rate, 45-47, Max. HR, 174,Lactate Threshold Heart Rate, 156.
resting....38-42........work....58-64....mondo mike
Jul 10, 2001 8:50 AM
now, 92.... after 3 hours of riding time on a 42x16 gear
with 165 cranks. avg. speed 18 mph, max speed 34mph. oh,
i'm 6-4 240lbs, age 35
5'11", 150LBS, 42BPM, (NM)J.S.
Jul 10, 2001 9:25 AM
nm
50bpm right now at the computer, 48, 6'2", 180 nmMel Erickson
Jul 10, 2001 9:33 AM
48 bpm, 28 yrs, 176 lbs, 6'3" (nm)Bruno S
Jul 10, 2001 9:59 AM
49-51 bpm, age 45, 148 lbs 5'9" Max @ 200 bpmBig D
Jul 10, 2001 10:32 AM
re: 5'9" 165lb 46rest 196max 58 yr.oldSteve A
Jul 10, 2001 11:01 AM
A down load from Sundays MTB race avg. HR for 1 hour 29 min @177 can see 196, and if im good and rested 46 resting Im 58 years old "honest"
33 yrs old, 5ft 10 in, 160 lbs,Pack Meat
Jul 10, 2001 1:29 PM
resting HR is around 45, max is about 195. 160 is heavy for this time of year but my results aren't suffering.
age39 ht.5'10 wt.145 RHR 51STEELYeyed
Jul 10, 2001 8:54 PM
resting heart rateChris McDonnell
Jul 11, 2001 12:29 PM
I'm 25yo, 5'6", 126lbs, 42 bpm sitting here at my computer and it will go to about 36-38 if I were to lie down. If I had a cup of coffee it would probably go to 50 bpm.

Before I took up cycling about 18 months ago it was always in the low 60s.

Chris
What is your shoe size?mnky grz
Jul 11, 2001 1:18 PM
Sorry for the sarcasm, but getting everyone's resting or max HR is about as useful collecting shoe sizes. Your HR info is unique to each person and changes over time, with age and stress. Probably the best thing to do is pick up a couple books on the subject. the one by Sally Edwards is OK, but lacks meat. The Lactate, Pulserate Training Guide(or whatever it's called) has a lot of good info.

BTW - My resting HR varies and my measured ultimate is around 206 bpm - 160 lb. 40 yr. old male. My shoe size is 9.5
Well I´m 17 and my resting HR is 47 (OK, I weigh also 180lbs.)ScottK
Jul 11, 2001 1:52 PM